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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Equipment failure probably caused a fatal laboratory explosion involving cold fusion research, fire investigators said. The blast at SRI International that killed one researcher and injured three others occurred after an automatic pressure-release valve failed on a sealed canister, said Menlo Park Fire Capt. Jim Lichtenstein. "One of the experimenters tried to open it manually to release the pressure valve and that's when it blew up," Lichtenstein said.
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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Equipment failure probably caused a fatal laboratory explosion involving cold fusion research, fire investigators said. The blast at SRI International that killed one researcher and injured three others occurred after an automatic pressure-release valve failed on a sealed canister, said Menlo Park Fire Capt. Jim Lichtenstein. "One of the experimenters tried to open it manually to release the pressure valve and that's when it blew up," Lichtenstein said.
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NEWS
January 3, 1992 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A metal canister used in a cold-fusion experiment at a major research institution near Stanford University exploded Thursday, killing one scientist and injuring three others. The explosion at SRI International in Menlo Park was described as a mechanical or chemical explosion--not nuclear--and occurred when one of the scientists was releasing pressure in a six-inch-tall cylinder, according to Menlo Park Fire Department spokesman Rick Reed.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A metal canister used in a cold-fusion experiment at a major research institution near Stanford University exploded Thursday, killing one scientist and injuring three others. The explosion at SRI International in Menlo Park was described as a mechanical or chemical explosion--not nuclear--and occurred when one of the scientists was releasing pressure in a six-inch-tall cylinder, according to Menlo Park Fire Department spokesman Rick Reed.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1987
Carter Hawley Hale Stores Inc., Los Angeles, formally announced the election of three new directors as part of its newly completed restructuring. They are: Caroline Leonetti Ahmanson, chairman of Caroline Leonetti Ltd.; Myron DuBain, chairman of SRI International; and Dennis C. Stanfill, president of Stanfill, Bowen & Co.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1987
Mary Ann Graves, finance director in the Administration of former Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr., will be in charge of state and federal government relations and trade association affairs for Novato-based Fireman's Fund Insurance Cos. Graves was named state superintendent of banks in 1979, the same year she became finance director, which brought with it membership on more than 30 state boards and commissions.
NEWS
January 28, 1993
Elmer Baum, 75, who helped start Apple Computer Inc. with a $5,000 personal loan. He lent the money to Apple founders Stephen Wozniak and Steven Jobs in the mid-1970s for the Apple I computer board. The Apple II came out in 1977 and the company took off, and Baum joined Apple as an engineer soon after. The two young entrepreneurs were friends of Baum's son, Allen. "The $5,000 from him really was what allowed us to build the Apple I," said Wozniak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1991
A retired Superior Court judge, siding with the Mobil Oil Corp., on Thursday selected Westinghouse Electric Corp. to oversee safety operations at Mobil's Torrance refinery. The appointment of Westinghouse as safety adviser by Judge Harry V. Peetris upset officials in the city of Torrance, which had favored a Northern California consulting firm for the crucial post.
WORLD
April 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Police at Sri Lanka's international airport detained three passengers arriving from the Maldives on suspicion of having links to Al Qaeda, a senior police officer said today. The passengers were booked to continue to Qatar, but were taken away as they waited at the transit lounge after arriving from Male, the Maldivian capital, said the officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity. The passengers, one man and two women, were being interrogated by Sri Lanka's Criminal Investigation Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1991
Three firms have submitted bids to the city of Torrance in hopes of being chosen to craft guidelines to regulate hazardous chemicals. The city plans to hire a consultant to develop an ordinance that would allow Torrance to ban chemicals it finds too risky. City officials say the ordinance may be among the first of its kind nationwide. Two of the firms were runners-up for another consulting job--the post of court-supervised safety adviser at the Mobil Oil Corp. refinery in Torrance. Arthur D.
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