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NEWS
December 27, 1986 | Associated Press
The government is holding indirect talks with Tamil militants, and the contacts could open the way for direct peace negotiations, a high-placed official said Friday. But the most powerful Tamil militant group said it will declare on New Year's Day a civil administration and police powers in Jaffna peninsula, the main guerrilla stronghold in northern Sri Lanka. The Tamil Tigers originally announced their intentions several months ago.
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WORLD
February 10, 2009 | Mark Magnier
A suspected Tamil Tiger suicide bomber blew herself up in northern Sri Lanka on Monday at a processing center for displaced residents fleeing the war zone, killing 28 people and wounding dozens, the military said. The attack in Vishwamadu comes as the rebel group -- which experts say pioneered the use of suicide vests as part of its three-decade fight for a Tamil homeland -- finds itself encircled and increasingly desperate.
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NEWS
November 5, 1989 | Reuters
Left-wing rebels fighting to topple the Sri Lanka government destroyed five processing factories in the Indian ocean island's central tea-growing region last week and damaged five more.
WORLD
October 28, 2006 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
In what could be the last, best hope for averting all-out war, the government of this island nation and the rebel Tamil Tigers are due to sit down today for their first face-to-face talks in months over one of Asia's most intractable conflicts. Both sides have been stung by heavy losses and international criticism in recent weeks, following a surge in combat that has left hundreds dead and thousands more refugees in their own country, forced to flee homes and livelihoods to avoid the crossfire.
NEWS
August 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Sri Lanka's government dissolved Parliament early and called quick elections in a bid to strengthen its political hand and end a war with Tamil separatists that has killed at least 62,000 people. Parliament's term would have ended in six days. Elections will be held Oct. 10, and the new Parliament will convene Oct. 18. President Chandrika Kumaratunga's move came after the government failed to win parliamentary approval of a new constitution granting autonomy to Tamil regions.
NEWS
November 27, 1988
The Sri Lanka government imposed a curfew in the suburbs of Colombo, the capital, after Sinhalese extremists prolonged a wave of terror by boarding a bus, shooting and stabbing passengers and then firing on troops rushed to the scene, killing six people, officials reported. The attack brought to at least 49 the number of deaths attributed to the militants in a 24-hour period.
NEWS
July 5, 1985 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
India has called on the antagonists in the bloody, 10-year-old ethnic conflict in neighboring Sri Lanka to sit down together Monday. For India, it represents a dramatic shift in policy since Rajiv Gandhi took over as prime minister.
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, whose country harbors thousands of Tamil refugees from the ethnic war in nearby Sri Lanka, said Monday that the Sri Lankan government has offered a new peace plan that should be acceptable to its minority Tamil population. But a Tamil leader later objected to the plan. "With the package that Sri Lanka has given now," Gandhi said, "we believe the Tamils can live in peace and security in Sri Lanka."
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
The leader of the Tamil Tigers, the main fighting group in the Tamil separatist campaign against the government of Sri Lanka, said Monday that he will respond to a joint India-Sri Lanka peace plan for the four-year-old conflict today in Jaffna, the Tamil stronghold on the northern tip of this island nation. Tamil sources in Colombo said that Velupillai Prabhakaran has agreed to turn in at least some of his group's weapons.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A socialist alliance that wants to try negotiating an end to Sri Lanka's 11-year-old civil war emerged as the top vote-getter in the troubled island nation's parliamentary election, official results showed Wednesday. But even as happy backers of the People's Alliance celebrated their victory by exploding firecrackers, the ruling United National Party was furiously trying to cobble together a coalition to safeguard its 17-year unbroken grip on power.
OPINION
July 7, 2005
Despite decades of ethnic terrorism, Sri Lanka has managed to remain a democracy, a beacon to other South Asian nations trying to advance from dictatorship to representative government. Attacks on police, soldiers and civilians have rocked its foundations, but the December tsunami that devastated Sri Lanka offered the hope of forging at least a temporary unity between the government and rebel terrorists. The hope was in vain.
NEWS
October 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Sri Lanka's president dissolved Parliament and ordered new elections after defections from her coalition left her vulnerable to a planned no-confidence vote. The second elections in 14 months will be held Dec. 5, a government spokesman said. The announcement came after nine lawmakers quit President Chandrika Kumaratunga's coalition Wednesday, reducing it to 111 of the 225 seats in Parliament. A Cabinet minister also resigned, the fourth in a month.
NEWS
August 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Sri Lanka's government dissolved Parliament early and called quick elections in a bid to strengthen its political hand and end a war with Tamil separatists that has killed at least 62,000 people. Parliament's term would have ended in six days. Elections will be held Oct. 10, and the new Parliament will convene Oct. 18. President Chandrika Kumaratunga's move came after the government failed to win parliamentary approval of a new constitution granting autonomy to Tamil regions.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | Associated Press
Calling captured rebel leader Foday Sankoh "a very vicious man," Sierra Leone's attorney general said Thursday that the government is nonetheless determined to resist pressure from angry citizens to take drastic action against him. Many Sierra Leoneans want Sankoh harshly punished for wreaking havoc on the country during more than eight years of civil war. His Revolutionary United Front rebels recently plunged the nation into renewed crisis and were holding hundreds of U.N. peacekeepers captive.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Sri Lankan army reels before an onslaught of rebel fighters, the people urging it to fight harder are the men in the saffron robes. Sri Lanka's Buddhist clergy, long an influential force in national politics, are stepping forward to rally the nation in its darkest hour. The string of defeats suffered by the army at the hands of separatist rebels, which has stunned and demoralized this island nation, has also drawn the monks out of their temples to try to hold the country together.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tamil Tiger rebels rolled into the city of Jaffna on Friday, forcing government troops to retreat and marking a tenuous but dramatic victory in this island nation's long civil war. Troops with the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, or LTTE, fighting for an independent state for minority Tamils since 1983, entered their cultural capital and met little resistance from government soldiers.
WORLD
October 28, 2006 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
In what could be the last, best hope for averting all-out war, the government of this island nation and the rebel Tamil Tigers are due to sit down today for their first face-to-face talks in months over one of Asia's most intractable conflicts. Both sides have been stung by heavy losses and international criticism in recent weeks, following a surge in combat that has left hundreds dead and thousands more refugees in their own country, forced to flee homes and livelihoods to avoid the crossfire.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
President Chandrika Kumaratunga imposed emergency rule throughout Sri Lanka, clearing the way for a delay in elections scheduled for Aug. 28. Military leaders have expressed concern that soldiers battling separatist Tamil Tiger guerrillas in the north of the island nation would have to be redeployed to secure voting booths.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stunning string of victories by Sri Lanka's Tamil rebels appears to have brought Asia's longest-running war to a decisive moment. The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, a ruthless guerrilla army fighting for independence for a portion of the island nation, are on the brink of the biggest triumph in their 17-year struggle.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
With Tamil rebels advancing along the northern peninsula and neighbor India refusing military help, Sri Lanka said Wednesday that it was shifting to war status. The Cabinet suspended all non-urgent development projects for three months, saying funding would be diverted to the war effort if needed. "The Cabinet decided to put the country on a war footing . . . immediately," Media Minister Mangala Samaraweera said.
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