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NEWS
August 29, 1989
A general strike called by Sinhalese radicals brought nearly all businesses and transportation to a halt in most of Sri Lanka. Despite government efforts to keep everything open on the first day of the weeklong strike, witnesses said almost all shops, hotels, offices and businesses had closed by evening in Colombo, the capital, and most of southern and central Sri Lanka.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | From Reuters
Colombo Port, traditionally one of the busiest in South Asia, is again buzzing with activity after having been paralyzed this summer by rebel-inspired strikes. Officials are pressing ahead with ambitious expansion plans and cutting the fees they charge shippers to revitalize the port and support Sri Lanka's war-ravaged economy. But shipping analysts worry that the government's efforts may not be enough to reassure merchants, who prefer to do business in calmer places.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | From Reuters
Colombo Port, traditionally one of the busiest in South Asia, is again buzzing with activity after having been paralyzed this summer by rebel-inspired strikes. Officials are pressing ahead with ambitious expansion plans and cutting the fees they charge shippers to revitalize the port and support Sri Lanka's war-ravaged economy. But shipping analysts worry that the government's efforts may not be enough to reassure merchants, who prefer to do business in calmer places.
NEWS
August 29, 1989
A general strike called by Sinhalese radicals brought nearly all businesses and transportation to a halt in most of Sri Lanka. Despite government efforts to keep everything open on the first day of the weeklong strike, witnesses said almost all shops, hotels, offices and businesses had closed by evening in Colombo, the capital, and most of southern and central Sri Lanka.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1987 | RICHARD ROTHSTEIN, Richard Rothstein is on the staff of the Monterey-based Organizing Institute, which trains leaders for labor, political and community organizations based in Monterey
A welcome minimum-wage increase to $4.25 next July still denies workers a decent living standard. Steady employment will produce gross income of $735 a month. With half for apartment rental, little remains for food, clothing, transportation, health care and other necessities. A $1.60 minimum wage in 1968 had buying power of $5.25 in today's dollars. Two years ago the state Industrial Welfare Commission estimated that $5.01 was necessary to keep up with that year's cost of living.
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