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Sri Lanka Revolts

NEWS
January 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
Police on Saturday released more than 1,200 people they arrested a day earlier for suspected links with Sri Lanka's Tamil Tiger rebels, officials said. The 50 Tamils who remained in custody were being interrogated for possible links with Tamil separatists, said Jagat Jayawardene, deputy inspector general of police in Colombo. Police said some of those detained could be suicide bombers.
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NEWS
January 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Police detained more than 1,500 Tamils on Friday after raids on suspected guerrilla hide-outs and arrested two Tamil rebels who officials said were planning attacks in a town with an important Buddhist temple. At least 329 Tamils were released after police questioned, photographed and fingerprinted them, senior police and army officers said. The rest were still being questioned. Police said some of those detained might be suicide bombers.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A suspected separatist Tamil rebel detonated powerful explosives strapped to her body near the prime minister's office today, killing herself and 10 others, police said. Prime Minister Sirimavo Bandaranaike was not in the building in Colombo, Sri Lanka's capital, at the time of the explosion. Police stopped the bomber near the office building. "Our people found her movement suspicious, and they tried to check her when she exploded herself," a police official said.
NEWS
December 20, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Asia's bloodiest and longest-running war, the fighting doesn't halt for the casting of ballots. A spectacular suicide bomb attack here at a weekend campaign rally in advance of Tuesday's presidential election failed to kill the country's leader but underlined a larger point: After 16 years and 61,000 deaths, the country's savage ethnic war hasn't even begun to exhaust itself.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the government's first military success since a major rebel offensive last month, Sri Lankan troops repulsed a land-and-sea attack Saturday by hundreds of Tamil rebels. Defense Ministry spokesman Brig. Sunil Tannekoon said 230 rebels and eight soldiers were killed in the fighting near a strategic northern military base. Afterward, the military reinforced its positions there, Tannekoon said. "We are fully prepared to face any new threat," he said.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Artillery shells fell around an ancient Dutch-built church filled with refugees in northern Sri Lanka, killing at least 35 villagers and injuring 80, amid fighting between government troops and Tamil Tiger rebels, a church official said. Bishop Raiaippu Joseph said more than 3,500 people had taken shelter in the church compound to escape the fighting. Sri Lankan troops had launched an offensive to retake parts of the Madhu church area that rebels had seized.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Army helicopters and buses carried hundreds of Sri Lankan soldiers to the northern front lines, a senior officer said, as the military struggled to hold off a major rebel offensive. The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, which is seeking an independent state, captured a broad stretch of territory in the island nation's northern jungles. The army has abandoned post after post, and hundreds of soldiers have been killed or have disappeared in surrounding jungles.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Tamil rebels overran several military posts in northern Sri Lanka, killing hundreds of soldiers, a senior army official said. The official did not know the exact number of soldiers killed but said about 600 were either dead, wounded or missing. The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam breached the government's front lines near the town of Oddusudan, 155 miles northeast of Colombo, the capital, and the official said they had seized one town and were shelling another.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Tamil Tiger rebels attacked three villages in southeastern Sri Lanka today, massacring at least 47 Sinhalese villagers, authorities said. About 50 people were injured, police said. The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam fighters attacked the villages, mostly inhabited by Sinhalese, before dawn. The rebels demand a separate homeland, accusing the Sinhalese majority of oppressing the Tamil minority.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Wailing mothers and sobbing fathers filed past scraps of clothing and two human skeletons displayed on tables in a police station Friday to determine if the remains belonged to about 300 people who disappeared while in military custody. The skeletons--one blindfolded and bound--were exhumed Thursday at a site in northern Sri Lanka where a former soldier said he helped bury bodies in mass graves. The remains will be sent to experts for further examination. The skeletons were identified as R.S.
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