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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1988
It is inconceivable that a debate should even exist as to whether or not the San Fernando Valley is in need of a park to support the arts, music and theater. What is the alternative? Miniature golf and overcrowded mini-theaters with SRO crowds for the schlock Hollywood deigns to send our way? We've finally been blessed with some first-rate restaurants, but the San Fernando Valley residents should not live by bread alone. MARILYN ELLIS-ANWAR Woodland Hills
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2009 | Josef Woodard
In the latest event in the 70th anniversary season of Monday Evening Concerts, a cultural rarity occurred: A challenging contemporary music program drew a sold-out house to Zipper Concert Hall, in contrast to the typically sparse audiences at the series' old haunt, the Bing Theater at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Monday's head count said something about the growing interest in new music in L.A. as well as the growing reputation of the late...
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NEWS
June 4, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Working his way through a box of chocolate doughnuts, B. J. Link, 28 and homeless, paused to lick a finger and ponder fate. Nope, he said, the latest threatened crackdown on the homeless on Los Angeles' Skid Row--scheduled to start today--won't bother him much. "I'm not worried about it really," he said. "I'll go over to the other side of Chinatown ... in the woods by Elysian Park." But if police do pull people off the street, "it's not going to solve the problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
A contemporary retelling of the Noah story, "Norman's Ark," the world premiere musical at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, is very much a dog-and-pony -- and cat-and-bat and giraffe-and-panda -- show. Part of the Festival of New American Musicals, the production positively groans with cuteness. Norman (Philip Casnoff), a Midwestern schoolteacher, is stranded on a rooftop with his family after a Katrina-like disaster. To wile away the time while awaiting rescue, he, his wife, Alice (Karole Forman)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1986 | ELISABETH GRAHAM
"Most of the time in school, we do what we're told. Here, we have to do more than what we're told," said Amand Subramanian, 17, referring to the regimen at SRO, Fullerton College's summer musical theater conservatory for high school students. The five-week conservatory, which provides training in movement, singing and acting as well as technical skills, will conclude this week with a staging of "The Wiz." The musical version of "The Wizard of Oz" plays at 8 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1999
Re "Planet Sideshow Opens in Santa Monica," by Shawn Hubler, Feb. 25: The "success" of Santa Monica, from my pedestrian and residential perspective, has been a cancer of traffic, mainly afflicting those communities still populated by significant percentages of working-class minorities. Realtors have taken to calling my neighborhood the "media district," instead of the Pico neighborhood. Like Hooters, Santa Monica has wedded its image to hollow fantasies scripted by B-movie hacks. When the show is over and the public turns its attention to the latest attraction (the "new" Westwood?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1987 | RUTH REICHL
One way to have a successful restaurant in Los Angeles is to have a star-studded clientele. And one sure way to lure the stars into your establishment is to have them as backers. Hire a star as the designer too and . . . the sky's the limit. That must have been at least part of the story behind the Malibu Adobe Restaurant (23410 Civic Center Way, Malibu, (213) 456-2021), which opened with a gala reception last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
A contemporary retelling of the Noah story, "Norman's Ark," the world premiere musical at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, is very much a dog-and-pony -- and cat-and-bat and giraffe-and-panda -- show. Part of the Festival of New American Musicals, the production positively groans with cuteness. Norman (Philip Casnoff), a Midwestern schoolteacher, is stranded on a rooftop with his family after a Katrina-like disaster. To wile away the time while awaiting rescue, he, his wife, Alice (Karole Forman)
OPINION
January 5, 1997
No charitable organization wants to be the focus of a story like the one written on the embezzlement of funds from SRO Housing Corp. (Dec. 24). The harm is compounded fourfold by damage caused to the trust SRO has earned through over a decade of compassionate work with the homeless in Skid Row. It will take time to overcome the injury created by one dishonest employee. However, the powerful lesson of the article should not be overlooked by other nonprofit agencies. People who work in nonprofits and serve on boards of directors tend to operate with high levels of trust.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1986 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission accused a small North Hollywood firm on Monday of fraudulently selling its stock to the public on the basis of a false audit report signed with the name of an accountant who was in prison at the time. Without admitting or denying the allegations, the firm--SRO Entertainment Inc.--consented to the entry of a permanent court order prohibiting it from violating securities fraud laws. The consent order was signed by SRO's president, Joseph A.
WORLD
February 21, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Gone these 23 years, John Wayne still inspires Navy Seabees. The Seabees were the heroes of one of the most famous war movies: 1944's "The Fighting Seabees," starring Wayne and Susan Hayward. It is the story of how the military, after the fall of Wake Island, formed a construction battalion (hence the name Seabees, from CB) that could fight as well as build. The film illustrates the unit's motto: Can do. Now the real Seabees have come here to play their role if there is a war with Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2002 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fate of two well-known professional theater venues near downtown Garden Grove will be in limbo at least through this month, the City Council decided Tuesday. The future of the theaters has been in question since last month, when the Grove Theater Center, which has been managing the two venues since 1994, asked the city for $20,000--in addition to the $40,000 it has been receiving annually since last year--to help promote its shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1999
Re "Planet Sideshow Opens in Santa Monica," by Shawn Hubler, Feb. 25: The "success" of Santa Monica, from my pedestrian and residential perspective, has been a cancer of traffic, mainly afflicting those communities still populated by significant percentages of working-class minorities. Realtors have taken to calling my neighborhood the "media district," instead of the Pico neighborhood. Like Hooters, Santa Monica has wedded its image to hollow fantasies scripted by B-movie hacks. When the show is over and the public turns its attention to the latest attraction (the "new" Westwood?
BOOKS
May 31, 1998 | RICHARD PARKER, Richard Parker is an economist and senior fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Center, John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University
Who, except for the historians, should care about the era of John D. Rockefeller Sr., J.P. Morgan and Andrew Carnegie today? After all, how could that time (and they) be anything but dimly relevant to our own?
OPINION
January 5, 1997
No charitable organization wants to be the focus of a story like the one written on the embezzlement of funds from SRO Housing Corp. (Dec. 24). The harm is compounded fourfold by damage caused to the trust SRO has earned through over a decade of compassionate work with the homeless in Skid Row. It will take time to overcome the injury created by one dishonest employee. However, the powerful lesson of the article should not be overlooked by other nonprofit agencies. People who work in nonprofits and serve on boards of directors tend to operate with high levels of trust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a former 96-room motel finishes its transformation into the $4.2-million Costa Mesa Village next week, officials and housing experts believe, the county's first single-room-occupancy project will set an example for housing low-income people. Already 15 people have moved into the much-touted village on Newport Boulevard, among them a Costa Mesa nurse, a Newport Beach nurse, an Irvine secretary and two night watchmen.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO
The city is littered with typical low-income housing projects: dark, depressing bunkers covered with khaki or pale brown stucco that are landscaped with weeds and litter. But, in recent years, motivated by tax benefits, government financing and the need to find new work during a recession, developers and architects have built more innovative, low-income housing projects. Leading the way downtown are 17 SROs (single-room occupancy hotels) completed since 1985.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | DIRK SUTRO
San Diego's new single-room occupancy residential hotels are garnering alot of attention, not just here but across the country. Out-of-town architects, planners, developers and politicians often inquire about the roughly 1,000 new SRO rooms built here since The Baltic Inn became the first new SRO in more than 50 years when it opened in 1986.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | IRIS YOKOI
The Community Redevelopment Agency board will consider in coming weeks whether to delay or withhold approval of several proposed low-rent Skid Row hotel projects since a recent study found a 14% vacancy rate in existing hotels. An agency-commissioned study released in October concluded that vacancies are up and will continue to rise at publicly funded, single-room-occupancy (SRO) hotels.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal for a residential hotel for the working poor, booted out of the civic center area of this upscale city after residents protested, is now being considered for an industrial site and is raising the ire of several businesses there. The new opponents aren't concerned about the type of people the single-room-occupancy hotel would bring to the neighborhood.
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