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BUSINESS
July 3, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
On the top floor of the Intercontinental Hotel overlooking Olympic Park, S. Joon Kim sipped white wine at lunch in one of the private dining rooms. Tired of traveling, he was considering whether to accept an invitation to Armand Hammer's recent 91st birthday party at the Beverly Hilton. Kim's job as president of Ssangyong Construction takes him around the world no less than a 110 days a year. At 36, he heads one of the first Korean construction companies to move into the United States.
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BUSINESS
December 26, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joint Venture to Build Cement Plants in N. Korea: South Korean conglomerate Ssangyong Group has agreed to a joint venture with North Korea to build cement plants to help the isolated communist state's weak economy. Ssangyong will also invest in building roads, telecommunications networks and other infrastructure in North Korea's first free economic zone on its border with Russia and China. Final details will be decided this spring, the company said.
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BUSINESS
December 26, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joint Venture to Build Cement Plants in N. Korea: South Korean conglomerate Ssangyong Group has agreed to a joint venture with North Korea to build cement plants to help the isolated communist state's weak economy. Ssangyong will also invest in building roads, telecommunications networks and other infrastructure in North Korea's first free economic zone on its border with Russia and China. Final details will be decided this spring, the company said.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Hee Kun, chairman of Samsung, South Korea's largest family-owned conglomerate, or chaebol , had just crowned one of his most successful overseas trips by receiving a handshake and praise from President Bush. Bush had attended a banquet to raise funds for a Korean War Memorial in Washington in early May to thank Lee for sponsoring the dinner and making a contribution to the memorial. But the glory faded quickly.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Hee Kun, chairman of Samsung, South Korea's largest family-owned conglomerate, or chaebol , had just crowned one of his most successful overseas trips by receiving a handshake and praise from President Bush. Bush had attended a banquet to raise funds for a Korean War Memorial in Washington in early May to thank Lee for sponsoring the dinner and making a contribution to the memorial. But the glory faded quickly.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1989 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday afternoon in Anaheim, the Residence Inn office has been cleaned up after the grand opening party the day before and S. Joon Kim is upstairs in a tiny conference room finishing some last-minute business before flying back to Korea. Kim's company is the owner of this new hotel and a harbinger of something Southern Californians can expect to see more of: Korean investors. In less than 3 years, Korea has greatly liberalized its once-strict prohibitions on investment abroad.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William E. Swank Sr.'s Korean business connection began in Bahrain 19 years ago. The California architect was in the Mideast working on the Diplomat Hotel at the same time that big Korean construction firms were undertaking huge projects in the area. Swank came to know and respect the Korean firms, particularly Hyundai Engineering & Construction Co., which managed to build a dry dock despite material shortages and skyrocketing costs. "I was most impressed by their work ethic.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Hot on the heels of the Japanese, South Korean real estate investors have snapped up nearly $500 million worth of Southern California properties--including the Los Angeles Hilton Hotel and Towers--in the past six weeks, a partner of Arthur Andersen & Co. said Monday. "I didn't expect them to move quite this fast," said Darlene W. Ryan at Arthur Andersen's Real Estate Services Group.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
On the top floor of the Intercontinental Hotel overlooking Olympic Park, S. Joon Kim sipped white wine at lunch in one of the private dining rooms. Tired of traveling, he was considering whether to accept an invitation to Armand Hammer's recent 91st birthday party at the Beverly Hilton. Kim's job as president of Ssangyong Construction takes him around the world no less than a 110 days a year. At 36, he heads one of the first Korean construction companies to move into the United States.
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