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St Clair Bourne

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2000
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: Today--"48 Hours: Ecstasy" (KCBS 8-9 p.m.) Reports on how laws are being toughened against Ecstasy, the popular party drug. A report will follow on MTV from 10-11 p.m. titled "True Life: I'm on Ecstasy," about the drug's effect on four people. Also, "Half Past Autumn: The Life and Works of Gordon Parks" (HBO 9-10:30 p.m.) A documentary on an American Renaissance man--photographer, poet, musician, author and filmmaker--airs on his 88th birthday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
St. Clair Bourne, a prominent independent documentary filmmaker whose work focused largely on African American social and political issues and cultural figures such as Paul Robeson and Langston Hughes, has died. He was 64. Bourne, a Brooklyn resident, died Saturday of pulmonary embolisms after undergoing surgery for the removal of a benign tumor on his brain, said his sister and sole survivor, Judith Bourne.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
St. Clair Bourne, a prominent independent documentary filmmaker whose work focused largely on African American social and political issues and cultural figures such as Paul Robeson and Langston Hughes, has died. He was 64. Bourne, a Brooklyn resident, died Saturday of pulmonary embolisms after undergoing surgery for the removal of a benign tumor on his brain, said his sister and sole survivor, Judith Bourne.
MAGAZINE
June 26, 2005 | EMORY HOLMES II
St. Clair Bourne has written, directed and produced more than 45 documentaries since becoming an independent filmmaker in 1968. His works have essayed the civil rights movement, the Black Panther Party, race relations and the African American church; his portraits of key cultural figures include acclaimed biographies of poet Langston Hughes, actor-activist Paul Robeson, poet Amiri Baraka and filmmakers Gordon Parks and Spike Lee.
MAGAZINE
June 26, 2005 | EMORY HOLMES II
St. Clair Bourne has written, directed and produced more than 45 documentaries since becoming an independent filmmaker in 1968. His works have essayed the civil rights movement, the Black Panther Party, race relations and the African American church; his portraits of key cultural figures include acclaimed biographies of poet Langston Hughes, actor-activist Paul Robeson, poet Amiri Baraka and filmmakers Gordon Parks and Spike Lee.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Filmmakers' Portraits Exhibited: Twelve African-American filmmakers are being honored in an exhibit of portraits that opens to the public Saturday and runs until Feb. 3, at the California Afro-American Museum in Los Angeles' Exposition Park. Honorees are Madeline Anderson, St. Clair Bourne, Charles Burnett, Ossie Davis, William Greaves, Charles Lane, Spike Lee, Michelle Parkerson and Melvin Van Peebles, plus deceased filmmakers Oscar Micheaux, Kathleen Collins Prettyman and Spencer Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON and All AFI Film Festival of Los Angeles events will take place at the Los Feliz Theater, 1822 N. Vermont Ave., Hollywood, unless otherwise noted. Tickets are available at Ticketron, Teletron and at the box office one hour before show time. Information: (213) 520-2000 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and
L istings and commentary for Week 2 of the American Film Institute Film Festival of Los Angeles, which runs through March 26: WEDNESDAY "Hart Crane" and "Langston Hughes" (U.S.A., both 1986, 6 p.m., Barnsdall Gallery Theater, free). These two literary portraits--directed by Lawrence Pitkethly (Crane) and St.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1999 | STANLEY NELSON
If we believe only what network television shows us, it's no wonder African American viewers don't seem to feel there are any positive images of us on the air ("Prime Time for a Show of Diversity," by Greg Braxton, Feb. 14). As the new millennium approaches, developers and programmers of prime-time network television still seem incapable of presenting a consistent and accurate portrait of African American life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Made-for-video sequels are nothing new for Walt Disney Home Video. The company has done them for such recent animated hits as "Aladdin," "Beauty and the Beast," "The Lion King" and "The Little Mermaid." But "Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure" is the first sequel to one of the studio's beloved animated classics.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends warned her about the hazards of walking alone in the pedestrian tunnels that connect the New York subway. It's dangerous down there, they said, forgetting--if they ever knew--that for years, Kathleen Cleaver lived with threats on her life; "the fact," she once remarked offhandedly, "that you might be killed any minute." Still, it came as a rude shock when a young punk--a kid no older than her son, Maceo--put a gun to her temple. Cash , he hissed. Give it to me. And that ring.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2000
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: Today--"48 Hours: Ecstasy" (KCBS 8-9 p.m.) Reports on how laws are being toughened against Ecstasy, the popular party drug. A report will follow on MTV from 10-11 p.m. titled "True Life: I'm on Ecstasy," about the drug's effect on four people. Also, "Half Past Autumn: The Life and Works of Gordon Parks" (HBO 9-10:30 p.m.) A documentary on an American Renaissance man--photographer, poet, musician, author and filmmaker--airs on his 88th birthday.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends warned her about the hazards of walking alone in the pedestrian tunnels that connect the New York subway. It's dangerous down there, they said, forgetting, if they ever knew, that for years Kathleen Cleaver lived with threats on her life; "the fact," she once remarked offhandedly, "that you might be killed any minute." Still, it came as a rude shock when a young punk, a kid no older than her son, Maceo, put a gun to her temple. Cash , he hissed. Give it to me. And that ring.
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