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NEWS
April 19, 1987
The National Institute of Mental Health is forming a board of independent specialists to review questions raised about procedures at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington after hearings for John W. Hinckley Jr., the presidential assailant. Experts in psychiatry, the law and forensic medicine will address concerns raised by U.S. Atty. Joseph E. diGenova after the surprise disclosure in U.S.
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NEWS
August 14, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A psychologist at St. Elizabeths Hospital alleges she was transferred and punished after recommending that presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. be permitted to leave the grounds for unsupervised visits with his parents. "My career was fine, no problems--until I wrote the recommendation in 1996," said Susan Lerner, a 15-year employee who said she has clashed with officials at the psychiatric hospital ever since. "Had it been any other patient, this never would have happened."
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NEWS
August 14, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A psychologist at St. Elizabeths Hospital alleges she was transferred and punished after recommending that presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. be permitted to leave the grounds for unsupervised visits with his parents. "My career was fine, no problems--until I wrote the recommendation in 1996," said Susan Lerner, a 15-year employee who said she has clashed with officials at the psychiatric hospital ever since. "Had it been any other patient, this never would have happened."
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr., after giving his first public testimony, received permission Thursday to start negotiations to hire assassination buff Mark Lane as his lawyer. "It is my belief that I have the right to choose who will be my attorney," Hinckley told U.S. District Judge June L. Green at a hearing on his request to dismiss his longstanding defense team and begin discussions with Lane. Green gave Hinckley permission to interview Lane and any other prospective attorneys despite reservations expressed by officials of the mental hospital where he has been held since he was acquitted by reason of insanity of shooting President Reagan and three others in 1981.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr., after giving his first public testimony, received permission Thursday to start negotiations to hire assassination buff Mark Lane as his lawyer. "It is my belief that I have the right to choose who will be my attorney," Hinckley told U.S. District Judge June L. Green at a hearing on his request to dismiss his longstanding defense team and begin discussions with Lane. Green gave Hinckley permission to interview Lane and any other prospective attorneys despite reservations expressed by officials of the mental hospital where he has been held since he was acquitted by reason of insanity of shooting President Reagan and three others in 1981.
NEWS
April 3, 1985 | Associated Press
A woman was committed to a mental hospital for observation after trying to follow the motorcade of Turkish Prime Minister Turgut Ozal onto the White House grounds today, the Secret Service said. "She tried to drive in the gate after a motorcade entered," Secret Service spokesman Bob Snow said. Officers at the gate prevented the woman from entering the grounds, he said. She was interviewed by Secret Service agents and then taken to St. Elizabeths Hospital.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | Associated Press
A Colorado man who used a hammer to break the glass display case holding the U.S. Constitution has been found not guilty by reason of insanity. Randall Husar, 37, of Fort Collins, Colo., was acquitted Wednesday of destruction of government property by U.S. District Judge Thomas Flannery after a non-jury trial. Both the prosecution and defense stipulated that Husar attacked the display case at the National Archives on Oct. 10, 1986. Flannery ordered Husar to return to St.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | Associated Press
John W. Hinckley Jr. wrote a letter discussing plans to escape from the mental hospital where he has been held since 1982 for shooting President Reagan, a prosecutor said Friday. The letter, "involving discussions Mr. Hinckley had with people regarding escaping from St. Elizabeths Hospital," will be introduced Monday at a hearing on Hinckley's request to make an unescorted Easter visit to his family, Assistant U.S. Atty. John O. Birch told a federal judge at a hearing.
NEWS
July 24, 1988
The Secret Service vowed to block any plan to grant presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. a supervised day's outing from the psychiatric hospital where he has lived for the last six years. St. Elizabeths Hospital proposed a recreational day trip for Hinckley, 33, in a letter dated July 19.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
John Hinckley Jr.'s bid for unsupervised visits with his parents got a boost as two psychiatrists testifying for the government said the request from the man who shot President Reagan in 1981 should be approved but only under more restrictions. Psychiatrists Robert Phillips and Raymond Patterson were the only witnesses called by the government as it concluded its presentation in the hearing to decide whether an unescorted Hinckley could leave St. Elizabeths Hospital to visit with his parents. U.
NEWS
April 19, 1987
The National Institute of Mental Health is forming a board of independent specialists to review questions raised about procedures at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington after hearings for John W. Hinckley Jr., the presidential assailant. Experts in psychiatry, the law and forensic medicine will address concerns raised by U.S. Atty. Joseph E. diGenova after the surprise disclosure in U.S.
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