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NEWS
May 22, 2010 | The Seattle Times
By Sandi Doughton The first earthquake rattled Mt. St. Helens on March 20, 1980 — nearly two months before the mountain erupted. But it took awhile for anyone to notice. The sole seismometer on the peak was linked to an apparatus at the University of Washington that recorded squiggles on 16-mm film. Twenty minutes of chemical processing yielded an image so tiny scientists used a magnifying glass to make out details. A punch-card computer chugged for half an hour before spitting out an estimate of the epicenter.
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SCIENCE
May 24, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists dissecting the remains of the disastrous 1980 explosion of Mt. St. Helens in Washington state say that crystal formations trapped in volcanic rocks hold important clues about when a magma-loaded mountain is about to blow - a discovery that could help volcanologists make more accurate predictions about future eruptions. The findings, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, link the movement of underground magma to earthquakes, gas emissions and other warning signs that are more accessible to experts who monitor active volcanoes above ground.
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NEWS
October 28, 1986 | United Press International
The latest non-explosive, dome-building eruption at Mt. St. Helens--the 17th since the volcano roared back to life with devastating fury in May, 1980--was declared over Monday by the U.S. Geological Survey.
NEWS
May 22, 2010 | The Seattle Times
By Sandi Doughton The first earthquake rattled Mt. St. Helens on March 20, 1980 — nearly two months before the mountain erupted. But it took awhile for anyone to notice. The sole seismometer on the peak was linked to an apparatus at the University of Washington that recorded squiggles on 16-mm film. Twenty minutes of chemical processing yielded an image so tiny scientists used a magnifying glass to make out details. A punch-card computer chugged for half an hour before spitting out an estimate of the epicenter.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Despite ongoing volcanic activity for the last two years, there is no indication Mt. St. Helens is on the verge of a repeat performance of its 1980 eruption, scientists reported Thursday. Scientists led by Richard Iverson of the U.S. Geological Survey wrote in the journal Nature that quakes appeared to result from the movement of a huge plug of igneous rock being shoved out of the volcano at the rate of about 10 to 20 feet a day.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2008
As a native of Seattle, I vividly remember when Mt. St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980 ["Fire-Breathing Beauty," Feb. 17]. I've since hiked there several times -- it's a beautiful, awesome park. So I take exception to the mountain being compared with a "lanced boil," a "rotten cavity" and a "wound." This is nature we're talking about, not a bloody slasher film. Perhaps Hugo Martin would have done better to skip across an idyllic dewy meadow blossoming with wildflowers. Alison Herschberg Williams Los Angeles
NATIONAL
October 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
Mt. St. Helens shot off a spectacular cloud of steam and ash Tuesday, dusting some communities miles to the northeast with light ash. Although some have worried that the recent stirring at the southwest Washington volcano could portend a major eruption, geologists said the more likely scenario was weeks or months of smaller-scale venting, with the possibility that some lava could further enlarge the dome within the mountain's gaping crater.
NEWS
May 15, 2005 | Rukmini Callimachi, Associated Press Writer
MT. ST. HELENS NATIONAL MONUMENT, Wash. -- The four bodies were found inside the family's car, their lungs filled with ash. When rescue workers finally reached them, also found were a cassette tape, recorded by Ron and Barbara Seibold's children on their way to the volcano. "They were goofing around -- asking whether or not they would see lava coming out of the mountain," said Jim Thomas, who was a top state emergency management official in 1980.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Mt. St. Helens released a towering white plume of ash and steam. The volcano has periodically sent forth billowing plumes since fall, when thousands of small earthquakes marked a seismic reawakening of the 8,363-foot mountain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1986 | United Press International
Mt. St. Helens continued Monday to rumble with its highest seismic activity since it ended its last dome-building eruption last June, scientists said. "Earthquake activity continued at moderate levels," U.S. Geological Survey spokesman David Brantley said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2010
SERIES NCIS: A terrorist group threatens to detonate a dirty bomb in Washington, D.C., in this new episode (8 p.m. CBS). Lost: The season opener of the quirky series is preceded by a special that recaps the series to date and offers a preview of the final season (8 p.m. ABC). The two-part season premiere follows at 9 and 10. American Idol: Auditions continue in Denver (8 p.m. Fox). Nova: In an episode title "Ghosts of Machu Picchu," archaeologists explore the Peruvian ruins and unearth burials of people who built the remote site (8 p.m. KCET)
TRAVEL
February 24, 2008
As a native of Seattle, I vividly remember when Mt. St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980 ["Fire-Breathing Beauty," Feb. 17]. I've since hiked there several times -- it's a beautiful, awesome park. So I take exception to the mountain being compared with a "lanced boil," a "rotten cavity" and a "wound." This is nature we're talking about, not a bloody slasher film. Perhaps Hugo Martin would have done better to skip across an idyllic dewy meadow blossoming with wildflowers. Alison Herschberg Williams Los Angeles
TRAVEL
February 17, 2008 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
In the dark, foggy shroud of an early fall morning, headlamps cast eerie lights on the faces of a dozen or so hikers lingering at a trail head that leads to the summit of the most active volcano in the continental U.S. The shadowy silhouettes of Douglas and Pacific silver firs border the circular trail head, known as Climbers' Bivouac. Towering overhead, somewhere in the darkness, lurks the angelically named peak that in 1980 unleashed America's worst volcanic disaster.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Cold weather combined with a continued release of water vapor generated a large steam plume at Mt. St. Helens, which has been having a low-key eruption since September 2004. "The warm, moist air rising from the lava dome condenses in the cold air and creates a cloud," said volcanologist Willie Scott at the Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, about 50 miles southwest of the mountain.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Despite ongoing volcanic activity for the last two years, there is no indication Mt. St. Helens is on the verge of a repeat performance of its 1980 eruption, scientists reported Thursday. Scientists led by Richard Iverson of the U.S. Geological Survey wrote in the journal Nature that quakes appeared to result from the movement of a huge plug of igneous rock being shoved out of the volcano at the rate of about 10 to 20 feet a day.
SCIENCE
December 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
For more than a year, Mt. St. Helens has been oozing lava into its crater at the rate of about 10 cubic yards -- a large dump truck load -- every three seconds. With the sticky molten rock comes a drumfire of small earthquakes. The movement of lava up through the volcano is "like a sticky piston trying to rise in a rusty cylinder," U.S. Geological Survey geologist Dave Sherrod said this week at the agency's Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Wash.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Earthquake activity has increased at Mt. St. Helens, but overcast skies has hampered scientists' ability to see what was happening at the volcano. Quake activity had been low, indicating that molten rock is moving upward with little resistance. By Saturday, however, quakes of magnitude 2.4 were occurring every minute or two. Clouds lifted a little at dawn Saturday to reveal the mountain covered with snow, but continued to lessen visibility.
NEWS
September 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
One year after Mt. St. Helens awoke from its slumber, the volcano that is slowly rebuilding itself is still generating excitement and wonder among scientists. At a briefing Friday to celebrate the one-year anniversary of an intense swarm of earthquakes that signaled the volcano's reawakening after 18 years of relative quiet, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey at the Cascades Volcano Laboratory in Vancouver, Wash., shared what they've learned so far.
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