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St Malo France

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TRAVEL
February 13, 2011 | By Benoit Lebourgeois, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Gusts of wind lashed at the bay windows of the ferry terminal in St-Malo, France. The ground wobbled under my feet. A child whirled at dizzying speed around his parents and a few hapless passengers, contributing to my queasiness. I was headed to the island of Jersey, in the English Channel, for a taste of winter that Southern California does not deliver. This was a treacherous journey over tempestuous seas and across the international boundary that separates France and the largest of the Channel Islands.
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NEWS
April 7, 1996 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kickoffs on the Los Angeles social scene do not refer to football. Rather, they are parties that signal something big is ahead. In the past few weeks, supporters of Otis College of Art and Design, the Music Center and the Doheny Eye Institute have hosted kickoffs for glamorous events with champagne, wine and hors d'oeuvres--all evenings of glamour themselves.
TRAVEL
October 7, 1990 | SHARON H. SILVERMAN, Silverman is a free-lance writer living in West Chester, Pa .
He was born in a cabin beneath bald cypress trees. He once caught a 45-pound catfish. He calls his dog "Gator Bait." Meet Ronald (Black) Guidry, host of "A Cajun Man's Swamp Cruise" in Houma, La. The three-hour boat trip, billed as "The Authentic Cajun Musical Cruise," offers close-up views of alligators, insight into the swamp ecosystem and a look at life in the heart of Louisiana's Bayou country.
TRAVEL
October 13, 1991 | JACK ADLER
Ferry sailings can be a scenic and money-saving alternative to high-cost flights for consumers traveling in Europe. Plying major routes throughout the European seas, these ferries make short runs that usually amount to overnight passages, thus saving the cost of a night's lodging. The downside, of course, is the extra time it takes to travel by boat.
SPORTS
July 20, 2001 | PETE THOMAS
They're called gentle giants by scuba divers who have gotten to know them--up close and personally. They're easily approachable and certainly gigantic, growing to 7 feet and 500-plus pounds. Yet, as such amiable lugs, the giant seabass--commonly referred to as black seabass--around the Channel Islands are highly vulnerable, even though they're protected by state law.
TRAVEL
March 20, 1988 | ROBERT NOAH, Noah is a free-lance writer living in Paris
I had been at the Sablonnerie Hotel here, one of the British Channel Islands off France, for only a few minutes. I had unpacked and was preparing to go to the sunny garden to enjoy my first Channel Islands-priced (duty-free) gin and tonic, when I realized that I had no room key. As I ordered my drink in the bar, I asked the woman serving for a key. She smiled and explained that there were none. I was surprised and exclaimed that I hoped therefore there were no thieves.
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