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NEWS
October 27, 1999 | The Washington Post
In the wake of the controversy over J.H. Hatfield's "Fortunate Son: George W. Bush and the Making of an American President," Robert B. Wallace, editor in chief of St. Martin's Press, resigned suddenly Tuesday. Wallace's departure is the latest in a bizarre series of events surrounding "Fortunate Son," which was published Oct. 19 and recalled by St. Martin's last week after the publishing house discovered that Hatfield is apparently an ex-con who once plotted the death of his former boss.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2008 | Joal Ryan, Joal Ryan is the author of "Former Child Stars." She is collaborating on a book about Christmas in the 1970s.
Evel Knievel was a superhero, from the tip of his jumpsuit collar to the bottom of his white boots. He mounted motorcycles, and even a few rocket ships. He leaped cars, buses, rattlesnakes and sharks in a single bound. He wore a cape. Even so, Knievel was no Superman. Underneath the star-spangled get-up, the first son of Butte, Mont., was a tale-telling, philandering ex-con who once smashed another man's arms with a baseball bat. And about those leaps . . .
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BOOKS
October 1, 1989 | Michael Harris, Column edited by Sonja Bolle
Karin is a middle-aged, once-beautiful Swedish expatriate whose obtuse, alcoholic English husband has cut his throat after the failure of a business deal--a rapacious development scheme in Ethiopia that, incidentally, caused the deaths of thousands of nomads. Just before that, their anorexic daughter drowned herself. Alone in a cottage on the Channel coast, near the scene of the latter tragedy, Karin grieves, rages and summons up the ghosts of her youth in Stockholm.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Rutten is a Times staff writer
Like Dr. Johnson's epitaphs, the subtitles of histories in search of a popular readership are not "given under oath." For that reason -- and because her story is impressively researched and engagingly told -- Frances Dinkelspiel, who is her subject's great-great-granddaughter, should be forgiven the histrionic subtitle of her new book, "Towers of Gold: How One Jewish Immigrant Named Isaias Hellman Created California."
NEWS
March 30, 2004 | Michael Koehn
Surviving the Extremes Kenneth Kamler St. Martin's Press $24.95 * The expedition doctor on the ill-fated Everest ascent chronicled in Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air," Kenneth Kamler, has written an absorbing account combining science and exploration as humans confront environmental extremes, from the vast reaches of space to the depths of the sea.
BOOKS
August 13, 1989 | Judith Freeman
"But what raises this story toweringly above the commonplace is the unmatchable character of the wonderful Rose, who offers counsel, perception, wisdom and corrective advice throughout, and whose unflappable and enchanting voice will be a high treasure for lovers of both music and words.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1991 | RICHARD CROMELIN
You don't go through a family album to find skeletons in the closet, and this pictorial parade doesn't go out of its way to dig up dirt or cast a light on Motown's darker side. Fair enough. But even a sanitized history should have more punch than this unfocused, 248-page scrapbook.
BOOKS
January 14, 2007 | Louisa Thomas, Louisa Thomas is on the editorial staff of the New Yorker.
"I am a man of my word," Luigi Bonnochio tells the owner of a camera store at the beginning of Natalie Danford's debut novel, "Inheritance." The expression, which he has learned from an English-language instruction manual, appears to be a simple declaration of trust and pride by a newly minted American citizen. It is easy to picture Luigi as Danford describes him: balding, deaf in one ear, nervously smoothing his lapels with his hands as he intones the words, testing their heft in his mouth.
BOOKS
September 3, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
Although comic strips in the United States have traditionally been limited to mindless comedy, Howard Cruse treats the AIDS crisis more intelligently in "Wendel on the Rebound," a collection of his strips about "the gays next door." Wendel copes with fear, anger, grief and guilt when he learns that his first lover, Sawyer, has the disease. Cruse depicts the effects of AIDS with an honesty missing from Hoffman's limp tale: Sawyer's fundamentalist parents banish him from their home.
BOOKS
May 14, 2000 | JACK F. MATLOCK JR., Jack F. Matlock Jr. is the author of "Autopsy on an Empire: The American Ambassador's Account of the Collapse of the Soviet Union."
"There is nothing more difficult to plan or more uncertain of success or more dangerous to carry out than an attempt to introduce new institutions," Niccolo Machiavelli advised his prince in the early 16th century. Boris Yeltsin seems to have understood the difficulty, because he wrote shortly after becoming president of Russia that "[n]ot a single reform effort in Russia has ever been completed."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2008 | Erika Schickel, Schickel is the author of "You're Not the Boss of Me: Adventures of a Modern Mom."
In April 2000, Sam MacDonald was fat, broke and deep in debt. A hard-partying Yale alumnus, he had spent a decade in an orgy of over-consumption, drinking his paychecks and living a Peter Pan-meets-"Animal House" lifestyle. And yet, this didn't finally scare him straight; it was a bad transmission and a shocking tax bill. "I would have lived that way forever if I could have," he writes in his first book, "The Urban Hermit." "I just couldn't. It cost too much.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008 | Eric Himmelsbach, Special to The Times
LONG before paparazzi became telephoto lens-wielding stalkers, John Lennon's life played out in front of the cameras. From his time with the Beatles to "bed-ins" and talking peace and revolution on "The Dick Cavett Show," the British musician did much of his living in the eye of a cultural hurricane. Arguably, he was the world's first reality TV star.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2008 | Patt Morrison, Times Staff Writer
Aren't we against human cloning in this country? So why do we now have "Becky: The Life and Loves of Becky Thatcher"? It's yet another novel that plucks a few cells from someone else's literary creation and cultivates them in another writer's petri dish until they grow into the same character -- in a whole 'nother novel. We've gotten used to it by now: "Scarlett," the authorized sequel to "Gone With the Wind," sold hugely well -- including one copy to me. Huck Finn's father, Lolita, Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2008 | David L. Ulin, Times Staff Writer
When last we saw Benjamin Braddock and Elaine Robinson, they were sitting in the back of a Santa Barbara city bus, flush with the excitement of escape. That's one of the defining pop culture images of its era, made iconic by Mike Nichols' 1967 film "The Graduate": Benjamin in his torn Windbreaker and Elaine in her wedding dress, the troubled past behind them and their lives together about to begin.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2007 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
This is, perhaps, an inopportune time to publish "The Far Reaches." The bloody battle against the Japanese in which Homer Hickam sets his novel, the U.S. military's struggle for the Pacific atoll Tarawa, took place 54 years ago, in November 1943. For some who were there and survived the slaughter, time has softened or worn away the memories. It's an episode to be recalled upon request. For others, though, memories of the fight for Tarawa, one of the most brutal in U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2007 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
READING "Love and War in California," Oakley Hall's latest in a long line of engaging novels, is like catching one last glimpse of San Diego and its glistening harbor the moment the sun disappears with a green flash below the horizon. You see the line of hills forming a backdrop to the newer towers with their glittery lights, and looking toward the beach, the now-ancient angles of the Hotel del Coronado emerge sharply against the darkening sky.
FOOD
December 22, 1985 | BARBARA HANSEN
Purple, pink, blue, green and yellow may sound more like colors in a fashion catalogue than shades of pasta. Nevertheless, one can introduce these hues into the dough as well as more somber colors like beige, black and brown, making a rainbow of noodles possible to those who follow Veronelli's teachings. Novelty mint, strawberry and blue Curacao pastas aside, his book is a good guide to dough mixing and cutting. And the "Ten Golden Rules of Pasta Cooking" should lead to a successful outcome.
BOOKS
November 29, 1987 | Judy Bass
First published in 1929, "The Fierce Dispute" was Helen Hooven Santmyer's second novel; her next one, ". . . And Ladies of the Club," achieved best-seller status when it was reissued in 1984. This brief, insubstantial tale probably won't be similarly popular because the hostilities it depicts aren't really "fierce" and riveting, so tedium sets in quickly. Santmyer, who died in 1986, portrays imperious old Margaret Baird, her daughter Hilary, and Hilary's little girl, Lucy Anne.
BOOKS
January 14, 2007 | Louisa Thomas, Louisa Thomas is on the editorial staff of the New Yorker.
"I am a man of my word," Luigi Bonnochio tells the owner of a camera store at the beginning of Natalie Danford's debut novel, "Inheritance." The expression, which he has learned from an English-language instruction manual, appears to be a simple declaration of trust and pride by a newly minted American citizen. It is easy to picture Luigi as Danford describes him: balding, deaf in one ear, nervously smoothing his lapels with his hands as he intones the words, testing their heft in his mouth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2006 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
THE trouble with writing a biography of someone like Mae West is that her image is not only larger than life, it's also big enough to dwarf the portrait you are trying to create. For most of her life, unto the very brink of the grave, she was engaged in imprinting that image of the sexiest of sexy women. Every action, every word, every gesture, off screen and on, seemed to be devoted to making indelible that persona.
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