Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStac Electronics Co
IN THE NEWS

Stac Electronics Co

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 22, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Software giant Microsoft Corp. conceded defeat to a company one-hundredth its size Tuesday when it agreed to license technology from Stac Electronics Co. and take an equity stake in the Carlsbad, Calif.-based firm to settle a grueling, yearlong patent dispute. Under the deal, Microsoft will pay $1 million a month for 43 months to license Stac's compression technology. It will also pay $39.9 million for preferred stock that can be converted in 2004 into a 15% stake for $9 a share.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 22, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Software giant Microsoft Corp. conceded defeat to a company one-hundredth its size Tuesday when it agreed to license technology from Stac Electronics Co. and take an equity stake in the Carlsbad, Calif.-based firm to settle a grueling, yearlong patent dispute. Under the deal, Microsoft will pay $1 million a month for 43 months to license Stac's compression technology. It will also pay $39.9 million for preferred stock that can be converted in 2004 into a 15% stake for $9 a share.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 3, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Microsoft Reworking Programs to Avoid Patent Claims: Reacting to last week's loss of a patent infringement lawsuit, the software company is believed to be revamping as many as six programs that make use of its disputed data-compression technology. Microsoft executives said the cost of changing the products will have no material effect on the company. But one official called the effort "a distraction." Last week, a Los Angeles jury ordered Redmond, Wash.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles jury Wednesday ordered Microsoft Corp. to pay $120 million for infringing a software patent held by Stac Electronics Co., a much smaller software firm based in Carlsbad, Calif. The verdict may help nudge the balance of power in the computer software industry. This is the first time that Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft, which has a reputation as the industry's Goliath, has been found to have infringed a patent. Software patents remain controversial; critics have contended that the U.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|