Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStac Electronics Company
IN THE NEWS

Stac Electronics Company

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 24, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles jury Wednesday ordered Microsoft Corp. to pay $120 million for infringing a software patent held by Stac Electronics Co., a much smaller software firm based in Carlsbad, Calif. The verdict may help nudge the balance of power in the computer software industry. This is the first time that Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft, which has a reputation as the industry's Goliath, has been found to have infringed a patent. Software patents remain controversial; critics have contended that the U.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Microsoft Hit by Infringement Order: A federal judge in Los Angeles issued a permanent injunction that bars the Redmond, Wash., company from selling one version of its DOS 6 software and directs it to recall the product from stores and distributors. The order by U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie follows a Feb. 23 jury decision that Microsoft Corp.'s DoubleSpace technology infringes two patents owned by Stac Electronics. Stac, based in Carlsbad, Calif.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Microsoft Hit by Infringement Order: A federal judge in Los Angeles issued a permanent injunction that bars the Redmond, Wash., company from selling one version of its DOS 6 software and directs it to recall the product from stores and distributors. The order by U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie follows a Feb. 23 jury decision that Microsoft Corp.'s DoubleSpace technology infringes two patents owned by Stac Electronics. Stac, based in Carlsbad, Calif.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Victory for Stac in Microsoft Dispute: Microsoft Corp. will have to withdraw from distributors thousands of copies of its DOS operating system software under terms of a preliminary ruling by U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie in Los Angeles. Rafeedie also said he intends to deny a Microsoft request to halt further shipments of disk-compression software made by Stac Electronics. In February, a federal jury ordered Microsoft to pay Carlsbad, Calif.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
Stac Electronics is a Carlsbad, Calif., software company with a clever product called Stacker that, by compressing data two for one, lets you stuff twice as much of it onto the hard drive in your personal computer. Stacker is well-known. Less well known is the company's ability to compress the value of your investment. If you bought Stac when it went public less than a year ago, you paid $12 a share. If you still have it, it's worth about $3. That's a compression ratio of 4 to 1. Amazing.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Victory for Stac in Microsoft Dispute: Microsoft Corp. will have to withdraw from distributors thousands of copies of its DOS operating system software under terms of a preliminary ruling by U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie in Los Angeles. Rafeedie also said he intends to deny a Microsoft request to halt further shipments of disk-compression software made by Stac Electronics. In February, a federal jury ordered Microsoft to pay Carlsbad, Calif.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles jury Wednesday ordered Microsoft Corp. to pay $120 million for infringing a software patent held by Stac Electronics Co., a much smaller software firm based in Carlsbad, Calif. The verdict may help nudge the balance of power in the computer software industry. This is the first time that Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft, which has a reputation as the industry's Goliath, has been found to have infringed a patent. Software patents remain controversial; critics have contended that the U.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
Stac Electronics is a Carlsbad, Calif., software company with a clever product called Stacker that, by compressing data two for one, lets you stuff twice as much of it onto the hard drive in your personal computer. Stacker is well-known. Less well known is the company's ability to compress the value of your investment. If you bought Stac when it went public less than a year ago, you paid $12 a share. If you still have it, it's worth about $3. That's a compression ratio of 4 to 1. Amazing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|