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Stacey C Koon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1995
Stacey C. Koon, one of two police officers convicted in the Rodney G. King beating in Los Angeles, has been moved from California to a federal prison in Sheridan, Ore. Koon was moved from a federal prison camp in Dublin, Calif., because it is changing to a women's facility. Koon, 44, is serving a 30-month sentence for violating King's civil rights. He is scheduled for release Dec. 14.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 6, 2011 | Jim Newton
When Rodney King careened to a stop in Lake View Terrace 20 years ago last week, the violent end to his flight also marked the end of a chapter of Los Angeles history. King's beating was, as the world soon discovered, captured on videotape by George Holliday, who had recently bought a video camera. Awakened in his Lake View Terrace apartment by the commotion outside, he turned it on and aimed it at the three Los Angeles police officers ? Laurence M. Powell, Timothy E. Wind and Theodore J. Briseno ?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1993 | Associated Press
In a letter written to officials setting the sentencing for the two officers convicted of beating him, Rodney G. King had asked for stiff punishment to "send a message to other police officers that the savage beating of unarmed citizens . . . will no longer be tolerated," according to a published report. The San Gabriel Valley Tribune, in a copyrighted story published Sunday, quoted the letter sent to a federal probation officer before the sentencing of Sgt. Stacey C.
OPINION
January 9, 2010
Five former Blackwater security guards are free today despite evidence that they killed or wounded more than 30 Iraqis in Baghdad's Nisoor Square on a September morning in 2007. They were freed on what conservatives like to deride as a "technicality" but which reasonable people should realize was a shocking violation of their 5th Amendment right against forced self- incrimination. What ought to be even more troubling to residents of Southern California is that the circumstances that led to the Blackwater dismissal are far from unusual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992
April 29, 1992, will long be remembered as "a day in infamy" in the history of California, and especially the history of Simi Valley! Given the facts that are known to the world, it is almost beyond belief that a rational and unbiased jury could find Officers Laurence M. Powell, Timothy E. Wind, Theodore J. Briseno and Stacey C. Koon not guilty in the Rodney King beating. This verdict is inexcusable for one very obvious reason: While most juries have to struggle with the uncertainty of circumstantial evidence in arriving at a verdict, the jurors in the Rodney King case had the unusual opportunity of seeing a videotape of the alleged crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1994
Police Chief Willie L. Williams said Tuesday that he expects to take action "very, very shortly" on a recommendation that Sgt. Stacey C. Koon lose his job because he was convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights. In a ruling made public Monday, the Los Angeles Police Department Board of Rights found that Koon should be stripped of his position. Conviction of a felony automatically results in the loss of a police officer's job under department rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1992
Sgt. Stacey C. Koon, the supervising officer during the police beating of Rodney G. King, testified Thursday in a lawsuit brought by a South Los Angeles man who said he was mistakenly shot and spent nearly a year in jail after a scheme orchestrated by police to cover up the incident. The lawsuit filed against the city, former Police Chief Daryl F. Gates and 15 officers claims that John Shelton Jr.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1995
The city of Los Angeles does not have to pay the lawyers who represented two ex-police officers convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights, according to a ruling released Monday. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies denied the compensation request by attorneys for ex-Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and ex-Officer Laurence M. Powell based on the verdict at their federal civil trial. "The criminal verdict . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1995
Stacey C. Koon, one of two Los Angeles police officers convicted in the 1991 videotaped beating of Rodney G. King, is expected to be released to a federal halfway house Monday, according to his lawyer. Koon, who has been serving his sentence in a federal prison in Oregon, will be transferred to the halfway facility in Rubidoux in Riverside County, said lawyer Ira Salzman. Salzman noted that Koon's expected release from prison comes three weeks after Laurence M.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. District Judge John G. Davies meticulously laid out his version of what happened during the beating of Rodney G. King, he minimized the illegal conduct of Stacey C. Koon and Laurence M. Powell. But, at the same time, Davies' controversial factual findings also cast a shadow across one of their acquitted colleagues--Officer Theodore J. Briseno, the only one of the four accused officers who has any chance of getting his job back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1995
Stacey C. Koon, one of two Los Angeles police officers convicted in the 1991 videotaped beating of Rodney G. King, is expected to be released to a federal halfway house Monday, according to his lawyer. Koon, who has been serving his sentence in a federal prison in Oregon, will be transferred to the halfway facility in Rubidoux in Riverside County, said lawyer Ira Salzman. Salzman noted that Koon's expected release from prison comes three weeks after Laurence M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court announced Wednesday it will consider arguments over the length of the prison terms for the two Los Angeles police officers convicted in the 1991 videotaped beating of motorist Rodney G. King. Acting on appeals filed on behalf of former Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and ex-Officer Laurence M. Powell, the justices also refused to review their convictions for violating King's constitutional rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1995
Stacey C. Koon, one of two police officers convicted in the Rodney G. King beating in Los Angeles, has been moved from California to a federal prison in Sheridan, Ore. Koon was moved from a federal prison camp in Dublin, Calif., because it is changing to a women's facility. Koon, 44, is serving a 30-month sentence for violating King's civil rights. He is scheduled for release Dec. 14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1995
The city of Los Angeles does not have to pay the lawyers who represented two ex-police officers convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights, according to a ruling released Monday. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies denied the compensation request by attorneys for ex-Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and ex-Officer Laurence M. Powell based on the verdict at their federal civil trial. "The criminal verdict . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1994
Police Chief Willie L. Williams said Tuesday that he expects to take action "very, very shortly" on a recommendation that Sgt. Stacey C. Koon lose his job because he was convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights. In a ruling made public Monday, the Los Angeles Police Department Board of Rights found that Koon should be stripped of his position. Conviction of a felony automatically results in the loss of a police officer's job under department rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1993 | Associated Press
In a letter written to officials setting the sentencing for the two officers convicted of beating him, Rodney G. King had asked for stiff punishment to "send a message to other police officers that the savage beating of unarmed citizens . . . will no longer be tolerated," according to a published report. The San Gabriel Valley Tribune, in a copyrighted story published Sunday, quoted the letter sent to a federal probation officer before the sentencing of Sgt. Stacey C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 20-year veteran Los Angeles police officer who retired this week was charged Wednesday with two counts of excessive force for allegedly using his baton last August to beat a pair of transients in what Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner called "simply a case of policeman as bully." Lance L. Braun, who was assigned to the Police Department's troubled Foothill Division, earlier received a 22-day job suspension after the incident was investigated by his supervisor, Sgt. Stacey C. Koon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court announced Wednesday it will consider arguments over the length of the prison terms for the two Los Angeles police officers convicted in the 1991 videotaped beating of motorist Rodney G. King. Acting on appeals filed on behalf of former Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and ex-Officer Laurence M. Powell, the justices also refused to review their convictions for violating King's constitutional rights.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. District Judge John G. Davies meticulously laid out his version of what happened during the beating of Rodney G. King, he minimized the illegal conduct of Stacey C. Koon and Laurence M. Powell. But, at the same time, Davies' controversial factual findings also cast a shadow across one of their acquitted colleagues--Officer Theodore J. Briseno, the only one of the four accused officers who has any chance of getting his job back.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As they begin their fifth day of deliberations, jurors in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial have a wealth of conflicting evidence to consider, giving them what analysts consider ample opportunity to support whatever verdicts they reach. For starters, there is the testimony of 61 witnesses--including experts offered by both sides, many of whom contradicted each other.
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