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Stacey Koon

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1992
The FBI has obtained a copy of a controversial manuscript written by Los Angeles Police Sgt. Stacey C. Koon about his years in the LAPD and his recollections of the Rodney G. King beating, federal sources said. In the 275-page manuscript, Koon--who was acquitted in the King beating--refers to the black motorist as "Mandingo," a reference to a Western African people used by some people to denigrate black male slaves.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1993
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday approved a $375,000 settlement of a man's claim that police framed him for a robbery to cover up his being shot by officers. Council members unanimously and without discussion approved the payment to John Shelton Jr., who was shot in the chest by a Los Angeles police officer on July 22, 1989, in an alley near Broadway and Florence Avenue. Officers said they mistook Shelton for a suspect in a holdup and thought he was about to fire a gun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1994 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The book publisher for Stacey C. Koon, the former Los Angeles police sergeant serving prison time in the beating of Rodney G. King, has circulated a mass appeal for donations to help Koon's family and to help him appeal his federal civil rights conviction as far as the U.S. Supreme Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1993 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) and 24 other members of the Congressional Black Caucus have written to Atty. Gen. Janet Reno requesting that she appeal the sentences handed down by U.S. District Judge John G. Davies last week to two LAPD officers in the Rodney G. King civil rights case. The 2 1/2-year sentences--significantly less than prosecutors had requested--have been criticized by African-American and other community leaders as far too lenient. Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and Officer Laurence M.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | Associated Press, staff reports
Comparisons between the federal and state Rodney G. King trials: THE STATE TRIAL CHARGES: State charges were assault and assault under color of authority, based on use of excessive force. JURY: State jury in suburban Simi Valley had 10 Anglos, one Asian-American, one Latino. WITNESSES: California Highway Patrol Officer Melanie Singer was called as a prosecution witness. King did not testify. OFFICER TESTIMONY: Three of the four defendants, Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and Officers Laurence M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1994 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Calling them "the first political prisoners in the history of our country," more than 200 people were present at a rally Saturday to protest the extension of jail sentences given to two former Los Angeles Police Department officers convicted in the beating of Rodney G. King. Family and friends of ex-Officer Laurence M. Powell and ex-Sgt. Stacey C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A feud among lawyers representing the four Los Angeles police officers charged with violating Rodney G. King's civil rights widened Thursday, as the attorney for Sgt. Stacey C. Koon filed documents suggesting that he will try to have one of the other defense attorneys removed from the case. The move by lawyer Ira Salzman threatens to jeopardize the position of Michael P. Stone, who represented Officer Laurence M.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police Chief Daryl F. Gates on Wednesday took issue with a Los Angeles Times report that his department is seeking the dismissal of four police officers indicted in the March 3 beating of Rodney G. King. Gates said the only pending recommendations before him were that the four officers--Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and Officers Theodore J. Briseno, Laurence M. Powell and Timothy E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The much-anticipated U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments Tuesday in the case of two police officers convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights were a casualty of the snowstorm that has gripped the northeastern United States since the weekend. Although the Supreme Court has been virtually the only government institution in Washington to put in full workdays this week, William Kopeny, who was planning to present the argument for Officer Laurence M.
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