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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Robert W. Welkos
After struggling in recent years, TriStar Pictures could be on the verge of a production boom in 1996. Movies starring Barbra Streisand, Tom Cruise, Julia Roberts, Robert De Niro, Wesley Snipes and Danny DeVito are either being shot or scheduled for principal photography in the coming months. And, big-budget sci-fi movies "Godzilla" and "Starship Troopers" are in the wings, as is a remake of "Zorro" with Antonio Banderas. One of the key players in TriStar's saga--one who has worked largely out of the limelight alongside studio chief Mark Canton and TriStar President Marc Platt--is Stacey Snider, the 34-year-old president of production.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before checking Seth Meyers' debut ratings. The Skinny: Do you know how often I quote from Harold Ramis movies? Probably every day something from "Ghostbusters" or "Animal House" leaves my lips. He will be missed. Today's Morning Fix includes Disney's new digital movie service, more thoughts on the Netflix-Comcast deal and early reviews of Seth Meyers' debut. Also, DreamWorks Co-Chairman Stacey Snider may be on the move. Daily Dose: SportsNet LA, the new cable channel owned by the Dodgers, makes its debut Tuesday night, but many fans probably will be shut out. Time Warner Cable, which is handling distribution for the network (for which they paid billions)
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BUSINESS
February 25, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Universal Pictures chief Stacey Snider, at the center of her own Hollywood drama, was scrambling Friday to close a deal to run DreamWorks SKG while facing a Monday deadline from her current boss to settle her future. "I'm under pressure to make a decision this weekend, and I'm going to honor that and figure this out," Snider said late Friday. "I understand this has been destabilizing for the studio." Lawyers for Snider and Viacom Inc.-owned Paramount Pictures Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Walt Disney Studios will no longer release movies from its partner DreamWorks Studios everywhere around the world. The two companies have renegotiated their longstanding agreement. Going forward, Disney will release movies produced by DreamWorks, the independent studio led by Steven Spielberg and Stacey Snider that made "War Horse" and "The Help," in the U.S., Canada, Latin America, Australia, and most of Asia. DreamWorks has signed a deal with Mister Smith Entertainment, a new company headed by Summitt Entertainment co-founder David Garrett, to handle sales in Europe, Africa and the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2001
Regarding Patrick Goldstein's "Horror Flick Scares Off Universal" (March 6): In her desire to explain why her decision not to release the horror film "House of 1000 Corpses" was not politically motivated, Universal Pictures Chairman Stacey Snider goes to great lengths to explain that she decided to drop the film because of her own personal disdain for horror movies that are too "real" (she has no problem with Universal's "Hannibal" because the presence...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Walt Disney Studios will no longer release movies from its partner DreamWorks Studios everywhere around the world. The two companies have renegotiated their longstanding agreement. Going forward, Disney will release movies produced by DreamWorks, the independent studio led by Steven Spielberg and Stacey Snider that made "War Horse" and "The Help," in the U.S., Canada, Latin America, Australia, and most of Asia. DreamWorks has signed a deal with Mister Smith Entertainment, a new company headed by Summitt Entertainment co-founder David Garrett, to handle sales in Europe, Africa and the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Universal Studios President Ron Meyer will be headed upstairs to parent company NBCUniversal before his time in Hollywood is done. The longtime head of the Universal movie studio and theme parks has a provision in his contract, signed in June 2011, stipulating that at some point in the next year or two he will move into an advisory role working with NBCUniversal Chief Executive Steve Burke, according to two knowledgeable people not authorized to...
BUSINESS
September 9, 2008 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Man, you know the debt markets are something awful when even Steven Spielberg is having a tough time getting a loan. But that's exactly what's holding up the DreamWorks SKG co-founder and his cohorts from launching their movie company with an equity infusion from India's Reliance Big Entertainment. Although Reliance is poised to invest $500 million in the venture for a 50% ownership stake, that deal hinges on the group getting a firm guarantee from lead bank JPMorgan Chase to raise as much as $700 million in debt financing to satisfy the business plan to make four to six movies a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before checking Seth Meyers' debut ratings. The Skinny: Do you know how often I quote from Harold Ramis movies? Probably every day something from "Ghostbusters" or "Animal House" leaves my lips. He will be missed. Today's Morning Fix includes Disney's new digital movie service, more thoughts on the Netflix-Comcast deal and early reviews of Seth Meyers' debut. Also, DreamWorks Co-Chairman Stacey Snider may be on the move. Daily Dose: SportsNet LA, the new cable channel owned by the Dodgers, makes its debut Tuesday night, but many fans probably will be shut out. Time Warner Cable, which is handling distribution for the network (for which they paid billions)
MAGAZINE
March 26, 2000 | Patrick Goldstein
How do you top sex with an apple pie? The question is unspoken but all-consuming as Universal Pictures Chairman Stacey Snider sits in a conference room with three young writer-producers. She's listening to their pitch for a sequel to "American Pie," the teen sex comedy about a group of high school guys and their quest to lose their virginity. There's a hint of urgency in the room.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Universal Studios President Ron Meyer will be headed upstairs to parent company NBCUniversal before his time in Hollywood is done. The longtime head of the Universal movie studio and theme parks has a provision in his contract, signed in June 2011, stipulating that at some point in the next year or two he will move into an advisory role working with NBCUniversal Chief Executive Steve Burke, according to two knowledgeable people not authorized to...
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
If comebacks were measured in award heat, DreamWorks Studios would be the champion of 2011. In its first year of operation following a messy 2008 divorce from Paramount Pictures, DreamWorks released just five movies but from those landed two Golden Globe nominations for best picture and seven nods overall. "The Help" collected five of those and also got four Screen Actors Guild nominations, including its best picture equivalent, the ensemble cast nod, and is widely considered a shoo-in for multiple Oscar nominations — for picture, lead actress Viola Davis and supporting actress Octavia Spencer.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2008 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Man, you know the debt markets are something awful when even Steven Spielberg is having a tough time getting a loan. But that's exactly what's holding up the DreamWorks SKG co-founder and his cohorts from launching their movie company with an equity infusion from India's Reliance Big Entertainment. Although Reliance is poised to invest $500 million in the venture for a 50% ownership stake, that deal hinges on the group getting a firm guarantee from lead bank JPMorgan Chase to raise as much as $700 million in debt financing to satisfy the business plan to make four to six movies a year.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood, director Steven Spielberg always seems to get his way. Which explains why someone as driven as Universal Pictures Chairwoman Stacey Snider would relinquish her powerful position as head of one of Hollywood's six major studios to run a small movie production label for a lot less money.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Universal Pictures chief Stacey Snider, at the center of her own Hollywood drama, was scrambling Friday to close a deal to run DreamWorks SKG while facing a Monday deadline from her current boss to settle her future. "I'm under pressure to make a decision this weekend, and I'm going to honor that and figure this out," Snider said late Friday. "I understand this has been destabilizing for the studio." Lawyers for Snider and Viacom Inc.-owned Paramount Pictures Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2001
Regarding Patrick Goldstein's "Horror Flick Scares Off Universal" (March 6): In her desire to explain why her decision not to release the horror film "House of 1000 Corpses" was not politically motivated, Universal Pictures Chairman Stacey Snider goes to great lengths to explain that she decided to drop the film because of her own personal disdain for horror movies that are too "real" (she has no problem with Universal's "Hannibal" because the presence...
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
If comebacks were measured in award heat, DreamWorks Studios would be the champion of 2011. In its first year of operation following a messy 2008 divorce from Paramount Pictures, DreamWorks released just five movies but from those landed two Golden Globe nominations for best picture and seven nods overall. "The Help" collected five of those and also got four Screen Actors Guild nominations, including its best picture equivalent, the ensemble cast nod, and is widely considered a shoo-in for multiple Oscar nominations — for picture, lead actress Viola Davis and supporting actress Octavia Spencer.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood, director Steven Spielberg always seems to get his way. Which explains why someone as driven as Universal Pictures Chairwoman Stacey Snider would relinquish her powerful position as head of one of Hollywood's six major studios to run a small movie production label for a lot less money.
MAGAZINE
March 26, 2000 | Patrick Goldstein
How do you top sex with an apple pie? The question is unspoken but all-consuming as Universal Pictures Chairman Stacey Snider sits in a conference room with three young writer-producers. She's listening to their pitch for a sequel to "American Pie," the teen sex comedy about a group of high school guys and their quest to lose their virginity. There's a hint of urgency in the room.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Robert W. Welkos
After struggling in recent years, TriStar Pictures could be on the verge of a production boom in 1996. Movies starring Barbra Streisand, Tom Cruise, Julia Roberts, Robert De Niro, Wesley Snipes and Danny DeVito are either being shot or scheduled for principal photography in the coming months. And, big-budget sci-fi movies "Godzilla" and "Starship Troopers" are in the wings, as is a remake of "Zorro" with Antonio Banderas. One of the key players in TriStar's saga--one who has worked largely out of the limelight alongside studio chief Mark Canton and TriStar President Marc Platt--is Stacey Snider, the 34-year-old president of production.
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