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Stacey Toran

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SPORTS
August 7, 1989 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Raider safety Stacey Toran, a rising star whose low-key personality belied a future glistening with promise, died late Saturday night when his car hit a curb a block from his home in Marina del Rey. He was 27. Toran was alone. Police said there was no sign of excessive speeding, nor any skid marks to suggest reckless driving. However, said Sgt. Robert Topete of the Los Angeles Police Dept.: "It's apparent that he was not wearing his seat belt." Toran crashed his BMW 735i at 11:30 p.m.
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SPORTS
August 19, 1989
I can understand that Stacey Toran's friends are upset by the report that Toran was drunk, but why not a comment from someone that, "He could have killed an innocent bystander!" To kill oneself is bad enough, to endanger others is inexcusable. JAMES T. HUMBERD La Quinta
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SPORTS
August 19, 1989
I can understand that Stacey Toran's friends are upset by the report that Toran was drunk, but why not a comment from someone that, "He could have killed an innocent bystander!" To kill oneself is bad enough, to endanger others is inexcusable. JAMES T. HUMBERD La Quinta
SPORTS
August 18, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
The two friends who were with Stacey Toran the night he died have told police that they spent almost five hours eating and drinking at a Marina del Rey restaurant. The two, who police declined to identify, said the Raider safety did not appear to be intoxicated when he left them to drive the few blocks to his apartment. Toran, 27, died Aug. 5 when he apparently lost control of his car and it cartwheeled more than 400 feet through a park.
SPORTS
August 7, 1989 | TOM LaMARRE
Stacey Toran was the second active Raider player to die in an automobile accident during the nearly 30 years the franchise has been in existence. Roger Hagberg, 31, a reserve fullback and special teams player for the Oakland Raiders in the late 1960s, was killed in an accident near his home in Lafayette, a suburb of Oakland, on April 15, 1970. By coincidence, Toran and Hagberg both wore uniform No. 30.
SPORTS
August 30, 1988 | MARK HEISLER
The last Raider holdout, strong safety Stacey Toran, signed his contact and joined the team Monday. Coach Mike Shanahan said he expects to activate Toran for Sunday's opener against the San Diego Chargers. Toran said he didn't want to talk about negotiations. In his absence, his place was taken by Zeph Lee, the former Trojan who was so impressive after being converted from halfback that the Raiders kept him and cut veteran Russell Carter.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989 | MARK HEISLER
Family and friends of Stacey Toran, the Raider safety who died in an auto accident Saturday night, gathered Wednesday in the Maranatha Community Church for a memorial service. "There are a lot of people who knew Stacey as a football player," said the Rams' Greg Bell, once Toran's Notre Dame teammate, who wept through his eulogy. " . . . To me, Stacey was a brother."
SPORTS
August 8, 1989 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Raider players and everyone else in camp down to the equipment boys wrote Stacey Toran's No. 30 on their sleeves and pants with magic markers Monday as the team returned to practice for the first time since the death of its strong safety. The Raiders worked against the Cowboys in Thousand Oaks. Afterward, Coach Mike Shanahan said it went pretty well. Considering . . . "I'm sure there was (a hangover effect)," Shanahan said. "To what extent, it's hard to say.
SPORTS
August 12, 1989 | Associated Press
Safety Stacey Toran was an All-Pro player even though he never had a chance to earn the title, Raider assistant coach Willie Brown said Friday in eulogizing the player who was killed in an auto accident last weekend. "We knew, his teammates knew--we all knew--he was All-Pro," said Brown, a member of the National Football League Hall of Fame. Fellow Raiders Greg Bell and Greg Townsend served as pallbearers. Toran, 27, died Saturday when his car struck a tree near his Los Angeles home.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
In professional football, where a sense of proportion seems to be the enemy, where George Allen describes losing as "dying a little," and players are routinely reminded to perform as if this were their last play, real death has intruded. Whatever the final small drill was that Stacey Toran ran Saturday morning at Raider training camp in Oxnard, it was his last. He died Saturday night when his car rolled over a block from his home, for the crime of not buckling his seat belt.
SPORTS
August 16, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
A previously unheard-from eyewitness told police Tuesday that Stacey Toran's car was traveling at 60-80 m.p.h.--almost double the previous estimate--when it hit a curb and flipped in Marina del Rey Aug. 5. Toran, a starting Raider safety, was killed in the accident that occurred less than a block from his apartment.
SPORTS
August 12, 1989 | JULIE CART and JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writers
The Los Angeles Police Department is attempting to reconstruct details of the traffic accident that killed Stacey Toran to determine how fast the Raider safety was driving when his car crashed a half-block from his Marina del Rey apartment last Saturday night. The officer in charge of the investigation, Detective Robert Smith of West Traffic Division, said Friday he wants to determine why Toran's car overturned so many times after jumping a curb.
SPORTS
August 12, 1989 | Associated Press
Safety Stacey Toran was an All-Pro player even though he never had a chance to earn the title, Raider assistant coach Willie Brown said Friday in eulogizing the player who was killed in an auto accident last weekend. "We knew, his teammates knew--we all knew--he was All-Pro," said Brown, a member of the National Football League Hall of Fame. Fellow Raiders Greg Bell and Greg Townsend served as pallbearers. Toran, 27, died Saturday when his car struck a tree near his Los Angeles home.
SPORTS
August 11, 1989 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Raider safety Stacey Toran had a blood-alcohol level more than three times the state limit for intoxication when he died last Saturday in an auto accident, the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office said Thursday. Toran had a level of .32%. California law recognizes .10 as the legal limit. Sgt. Robert Topete, of the Los Angeles Police Department's West Traffic Division, called .32 "particularly high." Dr.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
In professional football, where a sense of proportion seems to be the enemy, where George Allen describes losing as "dying a little," and players are routinely reminded to perform as if this were their last play, real death has intruded. Whatever the final small drill was that Stacey Toran ran Saturday morning at Raider training camp in Oxnard, it was his last. He died Saturday night when his car rolled over a block from his home, for the crime of not buckling his seat belt.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989 | MARK HEISLER
Family and friends of Stacey Toran, the Raider safety who died in an auto accident Saturday night, gathered Wednesday in the Maranatha Community Church for a memorial service. "There are a lot of people who knew Stacey as a football player," said the Rams' Greg Bell, once Toran's Notre Dame teammate, who wept through his eulogy. " . . . To me, Stacey was a brother."
SPORTS
August 18, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
The two friends who were with Stacey Toran the night he died have told police that they spent almost five hours eating and drinking at a Marina del Rey restaurant. The two, who police declined to identify, said the Raider safety did not appear to be intoxicated when he left them to drive the few blocks to his apartment. Toran, 27, died Aug. 5 when he apparently lost control of his car and it cartwheeled more than 400 feet through a park.
SPORTS
August 8, 1989 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Raider players and everyone else in camp down to the equipment boys wrote Stacey Toran's No. 30 on their sleeves and pants with magic markers Monday as the team returned to practice for the first time since the death of its strong safety. The Raiders worked against the Cowboys in Thousand Oaks. Afterward, Coach Mike Shanahan said it went pretty well. Considering . . . "I'm sure there was (a hangover effect)," Shanahan said. "To what extent, it's hard to say.
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