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Stacy Allison

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NEWS
May 13, 1990 | LINDA BETH MOTHNER, Mothner is a Southland free-lance writer
Life at sea level agrees with Stacy Allison. It's a wonder, considering that two years ago she reached the summit of Mt. Everest, making her the first American woman to scale the tallest peak in the world. Fueled by the same clarity of purpose and precision that took her to the top of the 29,108-foot summit, the 31-year-old residential building contractor from Portland, Ore.
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NEWS
September 25, 1991 | KIRSTEN A. CONOVER, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
To climber Stacy Allison, mountains are metaphors. Like challenges in life, they present new heights to be scaled. They push her to set goals, work hard, overcome obstacles and adjust to new environments--one step at a time. Allison was, in 1988, the first American woman to reach the top of Mt. Everest, the world's tallest mountain at 29,028 feet. Three years from now, she plans to scale another giant: K2, on the border of Pakistan and Tibet, the world's second-tallest mountain at 28,250 feet.
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NEWS
September 25, 1991 | KIRSTEN A. CONOVER, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
To climber Stacy Allison, mountains are metaphors. Like challenges in life, they present new heights to be scaled. They push her to set goals, work hard, overcome obstacles and adjust to new environments--one step at a time. Allison was, in 1988, the first American woman to reach the top of Mt. Everest, the world's tallest mountain at 29,028 feet. Three years from now, she plans to scale another giant: K2, on the border of Pakistan and Tibet, the world's second-tallest mountain at 28,250 feet.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | LINDA BETH MOTHNER, Mothner is a Southland free-lance writer
Life at sea level agrees with Stacy Allison. It's a wonder, considering that two years ago she reached the summit of Mt. Everest, making her the first American woman to scale the tallest peak in the world. Fueled by the same clarity of purpose and precision that took her to the top of the 29,108-foot summit, the 31-year-old residential building contractor from Portland, Ore.
SPORTS
November 3, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
There were flowers, banners and balloons, mixed with rain, for Stacy Allison and Peggy Luce when they arrived home in the Pacific Northwest Wednesday. The flowers, banners and balloons celebrated their new status as the first and second American women to climb Mt. Everest. The rain could have been tears for all the other climbers who died trying. "It's finally over and done with," Allison said during a news conference at Seattle-Tacoma Airport.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | From Reuters
Stacy Allison, a 29-year-old construction worker from Portland, Ore., has become the first woman from the United States to climb Mt. Everest, Nepal's Tourism Ministry said today. It said Allison, in an 11-member team calling itself "Cowboys on Everest," stood at 29,028 feet atop the world's highest mountain on Thursday morning with Nepali climber Pasang Gyalzen, 26. They climbed the southeast ridge, the standard route to the top.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | United Press International
The Northwest American Everest Expedition plans to move out Saturday from its base camp more than halfway up the world's highest peak in anticipation of reaching the summit next week, a Seattle spokesman said today. Dan McConnell reported the eight-member team hopes to send three people to the summit of 29,108-foot Mt. Everest on Wednesday.
NEWS
February 6, 1992
The 1992 Kashi Bicycling and Adventure Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the O'Brien Pavillion at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. The ninth annual festival features more than 75 booths, varied bicycling events and the California Indoor Climbing Championships. More than 250 of the top climbers in North America are expected to compete on a 35-foot-high climbing wall. Stacy Allison, the first American woman to climb Mt.
SPORTS
November 3, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Sue Cobb, a 50-year-old lawyer from Washington, D.C., was on her way up the other side of the mountain when Stacy Allison became the first American woman to reach the top of Mt. Everest on Sept. 29. Cobb, daunted by wind and poor weather, got no higher than 24,500 feet, nearly a mile below the summit.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Stacy Marie Allison, a building contractor from Portland, Ore., became the first American woman to scale Mt. Everest, Nepal's Ministry of Tourism said Friday. The ministry, which authorizes Himalayan expeditions, said Allison, 30, reached the 29,028-foot summit at 10:38 a.m. Thursday, having followed the southeast ridge, the standard route to the top. Allison, who began her climb Aug. 22, was accompanied by Sherpa guide Pasang Gyalzen, 26, the announcement said.
SPORTS
November 3, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
There were flowers, banners and balloons, mixed with rain, for Stacy Allison and Peggy Luce when they arrived home in the Pacific Northwest Wednesday. The flowers, banners and balloons celebrated their new status as the first and second American women to climb Mt. Everest. The rain could have been tears for all the other climbers who died trying. "It's finally over and done with," Allison said during a news conference at Seattle-Tacoma Airport.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | United Press International
A costly autumn climbing season has claimed the lives of at least eight more people, including four Czechoslovaks on Mt. Everest and two Icelanders on another Himalayan peak, Nepal's Ministry of Tourism said Monday. The four Czechoslovaks have been missing and feared dead since an Oct. 17 assault on the peak of 29,028-foot Mt. Everest, the ministry said. A U.S. expedition that had placed two women on the summit tried unsuccessfully to find the Czechoslovak climbers.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--Art lovers will get their first look at the flip side of a well-known Michelangelo drawing of the suicide of Cleopatra when it goes on display Sunday at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, Director J. Carter Brown said. The newly discovered drawing, which was found in August, had not been noticed before because it was on the reverse side of a better known work that had been pasted onto a backing.
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