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Stacy Keach

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Susan King
Stacy Keach's dance card is quite full these days. "I have done four sitcoms in five weeks!" said the 72-year-old actor, who first demonstrated his comedic chops as Cheech and Chong's nemesis Sgt. Stedenko in the 1978 stoner comedy "Up in Smoke. " Just last week, he appeared in the L.A. Theatre Works production of Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" at UCLA, and on Sunday he'll be narrating Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" at the "EEK! At the Greek" Halloween concert with the Symphony in the Glen Orchestra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Susan King
Stacy Keach's dance card is quite full these days. "I have done four sitcoms in five weeks!" said the 72-year-old actor, who first demonstrated his comedic chops as Cheech and Chong's nemesis Sgt. Stedenko in the 1978 stoner comedy "Up in Smoke. " Just last week, he appeared in the L.A. Theatre Works production of Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" at UCLA, and on Sunday he'll be narrating Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" at the "EEK! At the Greek" Halloween concert with the Symphony in the Glen Orchestra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Stacy Keach, better known to television viewers as Mike Hammer, will star in the title role of "Richard III" when the Shakespeare Theater at the Folger's 1990-91 season opens Sept. 11. It won't be the first time Keach has trod the boards in Washington. He was here four years ago when the flamboyant director Peter Sellars cast him in the starring role in "Idiot's Delight" at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2012 | By David Ng
The Los Angeles premiere of "Other Desert Cities" by Jon Robin Baitz is to feature Jeannie Berlin, JoBeth Williams and Robin Weigert. The actors are joining the previously announced Justin Long and Robert Foxworth in the comedy about a wealthy family living in Palm Springs. "Other Desert Cities" -- which was a finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for drama -- is scheduled to open Dec. 9 at the Mark Taper Forum. The play premiered off-Broadway in 2011 and transferred to Broadway the same year with a cast that included Stockard Channing, Judith Light, Stacy Keach and Rachel Griffiths.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I'm a gonna kill you." The TV airwaves are awash with a sinister Stacy Keach taunting Maxwell Caulfield in ads for the touring production of Anthony Shaffer's Tony-winning "Sleuth" (opening next Thursday at the Ahmanson). Keach and Caulfield play, respectively, a betrayed husband and his wife's lover--roles essayed by Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine in the 1972 film. "As written, my character, Andrew Wyke, is in his late 50s-early 60s," Keach, 47, noted of the age discrepancy.
NEWS
June 7, 1985 | Associated Press
Stacy Keach returned to the United States today after serving six months in a British prison for cocaine smuggling, expressing relief at being home and promising to wage a war against drug abuse. "I can't tell you enough how great it is to be alive, to be home and in New York City," the actor said at Kennedy International Airport. "It was great to fly in and see that lady with the torch. "These past six months have been the most painful ever for me, and also very educational.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Stacy Keach Sr., a character actor, director and producer who was the father of actor Stacy Keach and director James Keach, died Thursday at Providence-St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank. He was 88. Keach, who had been in failing health for the last 14 months, died of congestive heart failure. As an actor, Keach appeared in hundreds of television shows and had a recurring role as the inventive professor Carlson on "Get Smart."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actor Stacy Keach may be a consummate master of electronic wizardry when he stars in the high-tech, Broadway-bound thriller "Solitary Confinement," but he had a little trouble in real life when he tried to conduct an interview on his car phone this week. Rain was splattering on his windshield--making it less than ideal for driving and talking he explained between interruptions from wife and children as he rescheduled the phoner as an in-person interview later in the day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1997 | DAVID GREENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hollywood comes to town, Ventura is not as it appears to be. What is normally The Thrift Factory at 222 E. Main St. has been transformed into "Claudette's Occult Shoppe" in Lower Manhattan. Glowing pumpkins near a make-believe newsstand down the street help turn the night into Halloween. The 65-member cast and crew of "Mike Hammer: Private Eye" have been spending 12 to 14 hours a day, five days a week, in Ventura County to make you a believer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Like many a dramatic yarn, the scary personal episode that actor Stacy Keach starred in as himself last week came with foreshadowing. Keach is scheduled to return to the stage Friday night at the Ahmanson Theatre, 10 days after he was hospitalized with what's been described as a "very mild stroke." "I can't tell you how grateful I am and relieved. I feel deeply blessed," Keach, 67, said Tuesday, his gravelly voice firm and clear over the phone from his home in Calabasas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Susan Tyrrell, an eccentric, husky-voiced character actress best known for her Oscar-nominated supporting role as a blowsy barfly in director John Huston's 1972 movie "Fat City," has died. She was 67. Tyrrell died Saturday at her home in Austin, Texas, according to the Travis County medical examiner. The cause of death was not yet known. The actress, whose many film credits included "Islands in the Stream" (1977), "Angel" (1984) and "Cry-Baby" (1990), already had played a number of colorful character roles on stage in New York before being cast in "Fat City," a boxing drama starring Stacy Keach and Jeff Bridges.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Set in an East Texas work prison in 1976, the turgid indie "Cellmates" pairs an incarcerated Klan bigwig (Tom Sizemore) with a happy-go-lucky Mexican fieldworker (Hector Jimenez). The bigot endures the lectures of a potato-farming-obsessed warden (Stacy Keach, full throttle) and falls for a pretty Latina maid (Olga Segura). Really, you can't blame Sizemore for turning the simplest physical movement or line of dialogue into a hoedown of over-gesturing. Co-writer/director Jesse Baget's incessantly talky mix of faux-Coens-style redneck grandiloquence and un-Coens-like visual flatness leaves the fidgety star trapped in garish close-up for most of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2011
SERIES Primeval: A raptor is on the loose in Victorian-era England in this new episode of the sci-fi series (6 and 9 p.m. BBC America). SPECIALS The 85th Anniversary of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade: This encore special spotlights moments from parades past (8 p.m. NBC). Holiday Block Party 2011: A suburban cul-de-sac gets a seasonal makeover in this new special (8 p.m. HGTV). America's Cutest Pet: A pig who plays the piano is just one of the adorable animals featured in this new special (9 p.m. Animal Planet)
HOME & GARDEN
October 5, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Actress Jane Seymour and her husband, director-producer James Keach , have listed a house in Sherman Oaks for sale at $2,195,000 or for one-year lease at $5,900 a month. The traditional home was built in 1960 for Keach's parents, character actor-director-producer Stacy Keach Sr. and his wife, Mary, who both died in 2003. The family home was put on the market for the first time in 2005. Then it was listed at $2.6 million to buy or $7,900 a month to lease. The gated house and detached guesthouse, in the upscale community of Longridge Estates, contain four bedrooms and four bathrooms in 3,320 square feet of living space.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Like many a dramatic yarn, the scary personal episode that actor Stacy Keach starred in as himself last week came with foreshadowing. Keach is scheduled to return to the stage Friday night at the Ahmanson Theatre, 10 days after he was hospitalized with what's been described as a "very mild stroke." "I can't tell you how grateful I am and relieved. I feel deeply blessed," Keach, 67, said Tuesday, his gravelly voice firm and clear over the phone from his home in Calabasas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Actor Stacy Keach was hospitalized Tuesday in Los Angeles for an undisclosed ailment and was in stable condition, his spokesman Dick Guttman said. Further details were not available. Keach, 67, has been playing Richard Nixon at the Ahmanson Theatre in a touring production of "Frost/Nixon," Peter Morgan's play about the 1977 interview encounters between David Frost and the former president. Ahmanson spokesman Ken Werther said the theater learned at about 3 p.m. that Keach was in the hospital and would not be able to perform.
NEWS
May 29, 1988
Stacy Keach is such a great actor that from the moment the film based on the life of Ernest Hemingway started, he became Ernest Hemingway. To quote the writer's son Jack, "Stacy was marvelous." Rosita Duchesne Malla, North Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Broadway Bound: Rupert Holmes' new thriller, "Solitary Confinement," will open on Broadway on April 22 at the Ambassador Theatre. The production, starring Stacy Keach, sold out a recent run at the Pasadena Playhouse and opened at San Diego's Spreckels Theatre on Sunday. It moves to the Kennedy Center in Washington next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2003
OK. 400 British actors have created a 98-CD set of Shakespeare's 38 plays. 102 hours for $600 ("To the Last Syllable," by David Gritten, Aug. 3). Just as notable is Shakespeare's 154 sonnets performed with enormous eloquence and sensitivity on a five-hour CD set for $19.95. They were recorded by one American actor -- Stacy Keach, considered by many as America's finest classical actor. Ned Manderino Silver Lake
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2003 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
Anyone opening the door to Stacy Keach's dressing room at the Mark Taper Forum can count on being whacked in the face with the sweet smell of success -- sweet enough to be cloying, actually. For several days after the opening night of "Ten Unknowns," his chamber was doused in the heavy perfume of congratulatory bouquets. "Dying lilies," Keach says with a laugh. In his windowless cavity backstage, Keach seems very much at home.
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