Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStacy Koon
IN THE NEWS

Stacy Koon

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When four Los Angeles police officers stand trial in Ventura County next month in the beating of Rodney G. King, the NAACP plans to have monitors in the courtroom to ensure that the area's conservative nature does not skew the proceeding in favor of the accused men. Representatives of the NAACP's Ventura and Los Angeles county chapters said Wednesday at least two members will attend each day of the trial, scheduled to begin Feb. 3 in the East Ventura County Courthouse in Simi Valley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
The FBI has released the file from its early 1990s investigation into LAPD conduct during Rodney King's beating and arrest. The file consists almost entirely of press clippings from newspapers such as The Times, the Los Angeles Daily News and the Pasadena Star-News. Memos in the file also indicate that FBI agents used a third-party monitoring service that archived and sold clips of major television and radio shows for research purposes. The FBI recently posted the files in part as a response to a Freedom of Information Act request by MuckRock , a nonprofit group that helps the public submit public records requests.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officer Van (Woody) Woodson cruised around the east end of town on a quiet Saturday shift filled with routine traffic stops and what cops call "unable-to-locate" incidents. It was hard to believe it was over. "Every day we talk about it, it has been looming over us," Woodson said, searching his beat for any reaction to the verdicts in the Rodney G. King federal civil rights trial. "I think it would have been a shock no matter how the verdicts had come out, just all the anticipation."
BUSINESS
February 9, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
After the riots last spring, Errol Smith knew just what to do. He got together some of the other black entrepreneurs he knows and proposed a plan. Then, on May 26, he went on the air. Thus began what may be the most unusual response by any business owner to the looting, burning and death that swept Los Angeles after four white police officers were acquitted of charges arising from the videotaped beating of black motorist Rodney King.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1993 | Compiled for The Times by Erin Aubry, Erik Hamilton and Danielle Masterson
ROBERT KIMMEL: 17, Irvine High School The sentence was fair. Justice has been served. But I still think there should have never been a second trial. These men were found innocent by a jury. King, after all, was speeding. He was breaking the law, which the judge pointed out in the sentencing. Unfortunately, I'm afraid this sentencing will have an impact on the Denny case.
SPORTS
August 9, 1993 | RANDY HARVEY
Although Forbes Carlile was educated as a physiologist, his work with the mind distinguished him from other Australian swimming coaches. According to Australian Olympian Dawn Fraser's 1965 autobiography, Carlile hypnotized his swimmers, often deluding them into believing they were being chased by sharks. Still active in the sport internationally after four decades as a coach, Carlile occasionally visits Los Angeles, where he stays with John G. Davies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Selecting Simi Valley as an alternative site for the trial of four Los Angeles police officers accused in the beating of Rodney G. King was the easy part. But accommodating the lawyers and jurors who will be involved in the case is another matter. Defense attorneys have been told that there is no office space available for them at the East Ventura County Courthouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When four Los Angeles police officers stand trial in Ventura County next month for the beating of Rodney G. King, the NAACP says it will have monitors in the courtroom to ensure that the area's conservative nature does not skew the proceeding in favor of the accused men. Representatives of the National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
As the members of the Christopher Commission investigate the beating of Rodney King, and all its ramifications, they'll try to determine to what extent training might have prevented the assault. The examination has already begun. Retired Assistant Chief Jesse Brewer has briefed the members on the Los Angeles Police Department's instructional methods. But the commission and its volunteer attorney-investigators will have to dig deeper, down to the street level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1992 | ALFEE ENCISO, Alfee Enciso teaches English at Palms Junior High School in Los Angeles. He previously taught at Markham Intermediate School in Watts. and
Stacy Koon, one of the officers involved in the Rodney King beating case, referred to King as "Mandingo" and feared him because he is black, but insists he is "not a racist." My students, in post-unrest discussions, framed their comments with the tired "I'm not a racist but . . . " and my colleagues bend over backward trying to show me how liberal they are. No one, it seems, wants to admit to our country's deeply racist roots.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|