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Stacy Peralta

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MAGAZINE
February 2, 2003 | Howard Libes, Howard Libes last wrote for the magazine about the popularity of skateboarding and punk music in Europe.
1970, Santa Monica Civic Auditorium: Stacy Peralta, a 12-year-old boy with sun-bleached hair, sits in the audience waiting for the surf film "Cosmic Children" to start. He watches in disbelief as people file in, hundreds upon hundreds of them, filling the seats. They all have the markings of surfers: flip-flops, Pendleton shirts, straw-blond matted hair. Frisbees fly around the room until the lights go low and the film begins.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Austin Peralta, the 22-year-old jazz piano prodigy, composer and son of professional skater Stacy Peralta, has died. Flying Lotus, the beat producer and labelhead who released Peralta's music, confirmed the news Thursday morning via Twitter, writing: "it kills me to type that we lost a member of our family, Austin Peralta. I don't really have the right words right now. " Peralta's cause of death has not been announced.  Peralta's recent output has ranged from collaborations on Flying Lotus' Brainfeeder Records imprint, including the pianist's 2011 album "Endless Planets," and session work for artists including Erykah Badu and the Cinematic Orchestra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
Stacy Peralta was fighting off bronchitis inside Santa Barbara's fabled Skate One complex - a kind of Willy Wonka world for skateboard manufacturing that he and former business partner George Powell established in 1978 to distribute their groundbreaking Powell-Peralta line. While the factory hummed with the day-to-day business of cranking out hundreds of candy-colored urethane wheels and pressing plywood into signature decks for Kilian Martin, Tony Hawk and more top riders, Peralta ripped into a box containing DVDs of his latest documentary, "Bones Brigade: An Autobiography.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
Stacy Peralta was fighting off bronchitis inside Santa Barbara's fabled Skate One complex - a kind of Willy Wonka world for skateboard manufacturing that he and former business partner George Powell established in 1978 to distribute their groundbreaking Powell-Peralta line. While the factory hummed with the day-to-day business of cranking out hundreds of candy-colored urethane wheels and pressing plywood into signature decks for Kilian Martin, Tony Hawk and more top riders, Peralta ripped into a box containing DVDs of his latest documentary, "Bones Brigade: An Autobiography.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Skateboarding legend Stacy Peralta's latest documentary, "Bones Brigade: An Autobiography," is like a high school reunion, filled with affectionate memories of an earlier, more innocent, time. The director returns to his pro-skateboard roots, and it's clear from Peralta's comments, sprinkled through the film, that the sport and the players remain his first love. But while his breakthrough documentary, "Dogtown and Z-Boys," cracked open the window on a largely unknown world in vibrant and visceral ways, "Bones" feels like an epilogue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson
Bob Biniak, whose daring and innovative skateboarding style as one of the original Dogtown Z-Boys helped revitalize the pursuit in the 1970s, has died. He was 51. Biniak died at Baptist Beaches Medical Center in Jacksonville Beach, Fla., on Feb. 25, four days after having a heart attack, said his wife, Charlene. To his fellow Z-Boys -- a ragtag group from Dogtown, a rough beachfront area wedged between Venice and Santa Monica -- Biniak was simply "the Bullet," a nickname that saluted his affinity for speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
One of the revelations in "Riding Giants," a new documentary about guys (mostly) who surf really big waves, is that really big waves tend to look more or less alike. This at least seems the case to this reviewer, who finds 2-foot waves totally gnarly and prefers to experience the beauty of the watery part of the world from the safety of the shore.
MAGAZINE
December 1, 2002 | KEITH DAVID HAMM
"Dogtown and Z-Boys," the recent hit documentary chronicling the skateboard revolution launched by surf-rat teens in Venice and Santa Monica during the mid-1970s, was an all-boys nostalgia session with one exception: Peggy Oki. Growing up on Westside beaches, Oki surfed and skated from an early age and joined the Zephyr skateboard team at its inception.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The rowdy and sometimes painfully raw "Lords of Dogtown" is a perfect marriage between film and skateboarder, and the way in which the camera tracks every incredible move of the movie's virtuosos gives it a dynamic, exhilarating energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Austin Peralta, the 22-year-old jazz piano prodigy, composer and son of professional skater Stacy Peralta, has died. Flying Lotus, the beat producer and labelhead who released Peralta's music, confirmed the news Thursday morning via Twitter, writing: "it kills me to type that we lost a member of our family, Austin Peralta. I don't really have the right words right now. " Peralta's cause of death has not been announced.  Peralta's recent output has ranged from collaborations on Flying Lotus' Brainfeeder Records imprint, including the pianist's 2011 album "Endless Planets," and session work for artists including Erykah Badu and the Cinematic Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Skateboarding legend Stacy Peralta's latest documentary, "Bones Brigade: An Autobiography," is like a high school reunion, filled with affectionate memories of an earlier, more innocent, time. The director returns to his pro-skateboard roots, and it's clear from Peralta's comments, sprinkled through the film, that the sport and the players remain his first love. But while his breakthrough documentary, "Dogtown and Z-Boys," cracked open the window on a largely unknown world in vibrant and visceral ways, "Bones" feels like an epilogue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson
Bob Biniak, whose daring and innovative skateboarding style as one of the original Dogtown Z-Boys helped revitalize the pursuit in the 1970s, has died. He was 51. Biniak died at Baptist Beaches Medical Center in Jacksonville Beach, Fla., on Feb. 25, four days after having a heart attack, said his wife, Charlene. To his fellow Z-Boys -- a ragtag group from Dogtown, a rough beachfront area wedged between Venice and Santa Monica -- Biniak was simply "the Bullet," a nickname that saluted his affinity for speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
"Crips and Bloods: Made in America," a documentary feature airing tonight on the PBS series "Independent Lens," begins with the arresting picture -- not a picture of an arrest, although those come soon enough -- of downtown Los Angeles hanging upside down in the sky. It's a simple but surprisingly potent image -- the city stood on its head -- and it captures as well as anything the menace and nonsense of its subject, the self-destructive assertion of territory and tribe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The rowdy and sometimes painfully raw "Lords of Dogtown" is a perfect marriage between film and skateboarder, and the way in which the camera tracks every incredible move of the movie's virtuosos gives it a dynamic, exhilarating energy.
NEWS
July 15, 2004
Skateboarding legend turned writer-director Stacy Peralta is a Los Angeles kid through and through. He grew up in Mar Vista, attended Venice High School and today calls Santa Monica home. His first love, surfing, is the subject of his latest movie, "Riding Giants," which opened last week. "It's more a documentary than a surf film," he says. Not surprisingly, he spends a good part of his weekend in the Pacific.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
One of the revelations in "Riding Giants," a new documentary about guys (mostly) who surf really big waves, is that really big waves tend to look more or less alike. This at least seems the case to this reviewer, who finds 2-foot waves totally gnarly and prefers to experience the beauty of the watery part of the world from the safety of the shore.
NEWS
July 15, 2004
Skateboarding legend turned writer-director Stacy Peralta is a Los Angeles kid through and through. He grew up in Mar Vista, attended Venice High School and today calls Santa Monica home. His first love, surfing, is the subject of his latest movie, "Riding Giants," which opened last week. "It's more a documentary than a surf film," he says. Not surprisingly, he spends a good part of his weekend in the Pacific.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
"Crips and Bloods: Made in America," a documentary feature airing tonight on the PBS series "Independent Lens," begins with the arresting picture -- not a picture of an arrest, although those come soon enough -- of downtown Los Angeles hanging upside down in the sky. It's a simple but surprisingly potent image -- the city stood on its head -- and it captures as well as anything the menace and nonsense of its subject, the self-destructive assertion of territory and tribe.
NEWS
January 13, 2004 | Steve Hawk
Greg Noll sat on his surfboard a few hundred yards offshore at Makaha, on Oahu's west shore. He was alone in the water, just beyond the impact zone where the waves seemed to be detonating rather than breaking, and he was arguing with himself. As he watched the surf thunder nearby, he figured the odds of living through a ride were a little better than even, and these days he had a wife and kids to worry about. But he'd spent much of his life preparing for and dreaming about this exact moment.
MAGAZINE
February 2, 2003 | Howard Libes, Howard Libes last wrote for the magazine about the popularity of skateboarding and punk music in Europe.
1970, Santa Monica Civic Auditorium: Stacy Peralta, a 12-year-old boy with sun-bleached hair, sits in the audience waiting for the surf film "Cosmic Children" to start. He watches in disbelief as people file in, hundreds upon hundreds of them, filling the seats. They all have the markings of surfers: flip-flops, Pendleton shirts, straw-blond matted hair. Frisbees fly around the room until the lights go low and the film begins.
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