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Stacy Snider

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BUSINESS
February 17, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Just two months after Paramount Pictures snatched DreamWorks SKG out from under the nose of NBC Universal, the newly invigorated studio is vying to acquire one of its rival's prized executives: Universal Pictures Chairwoman Stacey Snider. According to four sources close to the situation, Snider has authorized her attorneys to begin negotiating with Paramount about the possibility of heading that studio's new DreamWorks division. Those talks are expected to begin this weekend.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Just two months after Paramount Pictures snatched DreamWorks SKG out from under the nose of NBC Universal, the newly invigorated studio is vying to acquire one of its rival's prized executives: Universal Pictures Chairwoman Stacey Snider. According to four sources close to the situation, Snider has authorized her attorneys to begin negotiating with Paramount about the possibility of heading that studio's new DreamWorks division. Those talks are expected to begin this weekend.
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BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Karen Kehela, 29, will succeed David Friendly as president of production at Imagine Entertainment, the powerful independent movie company headed by director Ron Howard and producer Brian Grazer. Kehela joins the small group of high-level Hollywood female movie executives that includes Columbia Pictures President Lisa Henson and TriStar Pictures production President Stacy Snider. Kehela began her career as an intern for Grazer eight years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
In a Senate committee hearing Wednesday Hollywood studio bosses claimed, as Capt. Renault did in "Casablanca," that they were shocked, shocked! that Hollywood often markets hyperviolent entertainment to children. Referring to the Federal Trade Commission's recently released report on the industry's systematic marketing of violent entertainment to children, Stacy Snider, chairwoman of Universal Pictures, told the hearing: "There are things in this report that shock me . . .
BUSINESS
November 3, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Seagram Co. said Robert Matschullat, a key figure in its transformation from a beverage maker to one of the world's biggest entertainment companies, will resign as vice chairman and chief financial officer next year. Matschullat, who will leave in June after four years with Seagram, said he is resigning to pursue other interests. He will be replaced as CFO in January by Brian Mulligan, co-chairman of Seagram's Universal Pictures unit. Matschullat will remain a consultant to Edgar Bronfman Jr.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Dueling actors, hardly a new concept on Capitol Hill. Stage right, the Senate Commerce Committee. Stage left, eight slickly groomed senior Hollywood executives summoned to this political theater to answer for marketing violence to children and for a movie ratings system that is too vague. In the process, they disclosed to their inquisitors that they're concerned citizens whose movies bring joy, and just as impressive, that they're loving parents.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | Hot Topic responses were gathered by Lynda Kim at Westminster Mall
There are two kinds of dreams: those that will be nothing more than dreams, and those that become reality with just a little bit of effort, a bundle of hope and a lot of luck. If you don't believe in dreams coming true, then why do you make a wish when blowing out your birthday candles? Why bother wishing upon a star? Everyone, even the skeptic, has to "dream a little dream. . . ." Hot Topics asks: "Did you ever have a 'dream come true'? What was it?"
BUSINESS
December 26, 1996
The year 1995 was marked by a New Year's Eve-like giddiness celebrating some of the biggest mergers in the history of the entertainment industry. The year 1996 seemed like the morning-after hangover. A lot of heads rolled, and companies realized that their acquisitions were full of problems. And a former studio owner, who everyone thought was out of the business, came back with a roar by buying Leo the Lion.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Admitting to "competitive zeal" in marketing violent movies to children, eight film executives offered varying acts of contrition to a Senate committee Wednesday but were divided over whether to end the practice. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) pointedly asked each of the film leaders lined up at a witness table before him: "Will you or will you not market movies rated R to children under 17?" Four executives provided a firm commitment to stop such marketing. They represented the Walt Disney Co.
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