Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStadiums Security
IN THE NEWS

Stadiums Security

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
May 25, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chicago Cub official said Wednesday that the organization is studying security issues that might have arisen from the May 16 brawl between Dodgers and fans at Wrigley Field. Beyond that, Mark McGuire, the Cub executive vice president/business operations, refused to divulge the club's course, if any. "We're in the middle of some things," McGuire said. "So, I'm not really prepared to make any great statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 3, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Tom Brady is a real nice guy. Maybe a little too nice. His kind spirit ended up costing a couple of part-time security guards at Reliant Stadium in Houston their jobs. Joel Williams told KHOU-TV that he was about to clock out following the Texans' 34-31 loss to New England on Sunday when he ran into the Patriots' star quarterback. “I said, 'Hey Tom Brady, good job, good game man.' He looked at me and smiled,” Williams said. “He was very polite, very nice guy, humble.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 15, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna, Los Angeles Times
MINNEAPOLIS  - The bombings at the Boston Marathon didn't so much heighten concern or raise fears among the Angels as much as affirm what they have felt for a while, that as professional athletes playing America's pastime they could be targets. "If somebody is crazy enough, you can probably do quite a bit of damage because there are just certain places that are pretty exposed," slugger Mark Trumbo said. "I think, by and large, there is a good level of security in stadiums, but I don't think anybody is 100% safe unless you're the President and have 24/7 security.
SPORTS
January 19, 1991 | MELVIN DURSLAG
In Munich, 1972, sports changed, very much for the worse. Up until that time, sports was looked upon as a carousel of sorts, children at play, detached from earthly events. Then one morning at the Olympic village in Munich, terrorists broke into the Israeli compound. The first person confronting them was the Israeli wrestling coach, a Moshe Weinberg. They shot Moshe dead. His niche in history is grim--the first man murdered in the 2,600 years of the Olympic Games.
SPORTS
April 21, 1989
Italian organizers of next year's soccer World Cup say they will sacrifice stadium capacity for security to avert the risks of fan disturbances. Officials said that Italian stadiums have been modernized for the World Cup, with numbered seats in the 12 stadiums and concentric circles of iron fences and police controls between 80 to 150 yards outside stadiums.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On football day, Anaheim Stadium becomes a small city. Population: about 65,000. Rowdiest neighborhood: the south side. That's where the visiting fans mix with the Rams rooters in the south end zone. That's where the stadium's 50 or so police officers prepare for the worst. Here they automatically cut off beer sales after the third quarter, "but that only means they have to walk farther for it," said one officer.
SPORTS
August 5, 1989 | GLENN FRANKEL, Washington Post
A British judge Friday put most of the blame on the police for the soccer stadium disaster in which 95 fans were crushed to death in northern England last April, saying police authorities planned poorly, lost control during the panic and gave "evasive" testimony afterward.
SPORTS
September 4, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON
The Dodgers, responding to charges by a former employee that included alleged safety violations at Dodger Stadium, issued a statement Friday denying all allegations and saying there are no public-safety issues at the stadium. In addition, Sam Fernandez, Dodger general counsel, said that it is not appropriate for the club to discuss the reasons for the departure Aug. 16 of Jim Italiano, former director of stadium operations.
SPORTS
October 19, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM
Rather than appear to be gouging customers, the Rams will increase the size of a $4 beer from 16 to 18 ounces at Sunday's game against the Atlanta Falcons at Anaheim Stadium, a Ram spokesman said Thursday. In an attempt to curtail beer consumption and resulting rowdy behavior, Anaheim Stadium and club management decided two weeks ago to stop selling 22-ounce beers for $4 and to sell 16-ounce helpings for the same price.
SPORTS
October 26, 2011 | Chris Dufresne
Five or six times a season this column could be titled: "Now I've heard everything. " Take this week … please. • A junior college is ranked ahead of the last two Rose Bowl champions in one of the six computer rankings systems used in the Bowl Championship Series formula. Arizona Western College of Yuma checks in at No. 30 this week in Ken Massey's computer ranking, ahead of Ohio State (31), Texas Christian (32), Houston (33) and Florida State (34). To be fair, Arizona Western is only No. 88 in the formula Massey submits for BCS use. Asked how a JC could even receive a BCS rating, Massey emailed a connect-the-dots matrix that started with Arizona Western's win against New Mexico Military this month and ended with Arizona defeating UCLA.
SPORTS
April 19, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
Introduced to Dodgers employees Tuesday as the club's new vice chairman who will oversee the implementation of improved security measures at Dodger Stadium, Steve Soboroff later met with reporters in the home team's dugout. There, he made a bold statement about how fan behavior of Dodger Stadium would change. "In one generation, the etiquette will be like it is on a golf course," Soboroff said. Do you really think the etiquette here will be like that on a golf course?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Police on foot, bikes and horses descended on Chavez Ravine on Thursday night as Dodgers fans got their first taste of the ballpark's new "zero-tolerance" crackdown on rowdy behavior, prompted by the beating of a San Francisco Giants fan on opening day. Many Dodger faithful said they were thankful for the beefed-up police presence, but disheartened it was necessary. After the assault that left paramedic Bryan Stow, 42, of Santa Cruz in a coma, team officials and the Los Angeles Police Department promised more uniformed officers.
SPORTS
May 10, 2005 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
After fan misbehavior marred a game last Tuesday and overwhelmed their security force, the Dodgers said Monday they would hire uniformed Los Angeles Police Department officers to patrol the stands at Dodger Stadium.
SPORTS
September 18, 2001 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The use of metal detectors or hand-held security wands cannot be ruled out when UCLA plays Ohio State at the Rose Bowl on Saturday before a crowd that could reach 80,000, Pasadena police said Monday. Police also were granted an FAA ban on low-flying aircraft such as the blimps and banner-towing airplanes that are common sights during Rose Bowl events, and fans should be prepared to have their bags and belongings searched before going to their seats, said Pasadena Police Commander Mary Schander.
SPORTS
August 25, 2000 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined to prevent another melee between the Dodgers and fans at Wrigley Field, the Chicago Cubs said they will increase security for a four-game series that begins today with a doubleheader. The Cubs will bolster security near the uncovered visitors' bullpen along the right-field line, where a May 16 brawl ignited during the Dodgers' previous visit.
SPORTS
September 18, 2001 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The use of metal detectors or hand-held security wands cannot be ruled out when UCLA plays Ohio State at the Rose Bowl on Saturday before a crowd that could reach 80,000, Pasadena police said Monday. Police also were granted an FAA ban on low-flying aircraft such as the blimps and banner-towing airplanes that are common sights during Rose Bowl events, and fans should be prepared to have their bags and belongings searched before going to their seats, said Pasadena Police Commander Mary Schander.
SPORTS
October 9, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM and STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirsty Los Angeles Rams fans got less beer for their buck Sunday as the size of drinks sold at concession stands was reduced in an attempt to curb violent outbreaks such as the beating of a fan that occurred at the Los Angeles Coliseum two weeks ago. And beginning Oct. 21, the next Rams' home game, hundreds of fans will have to wait an extra hour before they can congregate in the stadium parking lot for pregame tailgate parties. The parking lot will open at 11 a.m. rather than 10 a.m.
SPORTS
May 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
One day after watching vendors sell beer at Wrigley Field beyond the time permitted, the head of security of major league baseball called for patience. "The Cubs are doing a good job," said Kevin Hallinan, who was in Chicago to monitor crowd-control measures being implemented after the Dodgers' May 16 brawl with fans in Wrigley's stands. "They're making the right moves and, like everything else, it doesn't happen overnight. I'm not here to change anything.
SPORTS
May 25, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chicago Cub official said Wednesday that the organization is studying security issues that might have arisen from the May 16 brawl between Dodgers and fans at Wrigley Field. Beyond that, Mark McGuire, the Cub executive vice president/business operations, refused to divulge the club's course, if any. "We're in the middle of some things," McGuire said. "So, I'm not really prepared to make any great statement.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|