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Staff John H Sununu

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NEWS
June 26, 1989 | From Times wire services
Nancy Sununu, wife of White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, has not ruled out a race for a congressional seat from her native New Hampshire, White House aides said today. Nancy Sununu, aides said, was not considering elective politics while she commuted between New Hampshire and Washington as her husband started his new job. But she now is settling into the family's new Oakton, Va., home with some of the couple's eight children. "It has never been ruled out nor has it been seriously considered before she got settled in her new home," one aide said.
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NEWS
July 17, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From Beijing to Buenos Aires, wherever President Bush has jetted, at his side--like Don Quixote's Sancho Panza, only even better traveled--has been a short, stocky man. In frame after frame, he showed up in the pictures as the President stepped from Air Force One, walked along the red carpets and sat down with his foreign hosts in plush meeting rooms. Who is that man, and where is he today? He's White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, and, yes, he's here in London.
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NEWS
May 1, 1989
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu said President Bush has told him that there was no quid pro quo discussion of expedited military and economic aid to Honduras in return for that country's assisting the Nicaraguan Contras when Bush met then-President Roberto Suazo Cordova there in March, 1985. Documents released at the Oliver L. North trial have implied that Bush played some role in a U.S. plan to expedite aid to Honduras in return for its assistance to the Contras. White House officials said secret documents will be released to buttress the claim that Bush's visit was not part of the quid pro quo deal.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu is in the Soviet Union to swap managerial pointers with Kremlin leaders. Sununu, known for his stay-in-touch management style, met with Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze on Tuesday to discuss plans for setting up a mechanism by which the superpowers can share advice on organizing state agencies, the official news agency Tass reported.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney today played down an apparent disparity between his assessment of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's chances of implementing reforms and the opinion held by President Bush. "The President and I were in a meeting yesterday and frankly chuckled at what has developed by way of press commentary on views that we have expressed. We do not perceive a significant difference in terms of our views of the situation with respect to the Soviet Union," Cheney told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | From United Press International
Gov. George Deukmejian, a strong Republican supporter of President Bush in last year's presidential campaign, has complained to White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu about the planning for the President's recent trip to California, it was reported today. Citing informed sources, the Washington Post said Deukmejian sent a letter to Sununu expressing his unhappiness with the failure of the White House staff to schedule time for him to meet with Bush while the President was in the state.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu is in the Soviet Union to swap managerial pointers with Kremlin leaders. Sununu, known for his stay-in-touch management style, met with Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze on Tuesday to discuss plans for setting up a mechanism by which the superpowers can share advice on organizing state agencies, the official news agency Tass reported.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | From Times wire services
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, a political conservative, has accepted an invitation to go to Moscow to help Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev organize his office, a spokesman said today. Sununu has already been offering advice, meeting this week with a delegation of visiting Soviet officials who are interested in how the White House works. Bush's spokesman, Marlin Fitzwater, said Sununu was invited by a member of the group to visit Moscow and has accepted.
NEWS
April 10, 1989 | From United Press International
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, reflecting President Bush's anger, has warned aides against "bad-mouthing" former President Ronald Reagan, a spokesman acknowledged today. The controversy apparently was touched off by complaints from former President Richard M. Nixon. White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater, who also was spokesman under Reagan, was obviously angered in discussing the matter with reporters. Fitzwater, who at one point accused a journalist of fabricating quotations, said Sununu had noted a report that some staffers were making disparaging remarks about Reagan and had cautioned them, "Don't do it."
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush said today he "learned a lot" from his just-completed six-state tour, designed to enhance his activist image 100 days into his tenure, and took a slap at unflattering reporting of the trip. "In terms of problem-solving, Washington . . . does not automatically know best," Bush told a gathering of the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council, a business-oriented group of state legislators. Apparently referring to news accounts that described his trip as themeless, disoriented and jumbled, Bush said: "It's a very important thing for a President to get outside the White House and move around this country.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | From Times wire services
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, a political conservative, has accepted an invitation to go to Moscow to help Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev organize his office, a spokesman said today. Sununu has already been offering advice, meeting this week with a delegation of visiting Soviet officials who are interested in how the White House works. Bush's spokesman, Marlin Fitzwater, said Sununu was invited by a member of the group to visit Moscow and has accepted.
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | From Times wire services
Nancy Sununu, wife of White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, has not ruled out a race for a congressional seat from her native New Hampshire, White House aides said today. Nancy Sununu, aides said, was not considering elective politics while she commuted between New Hampshire and Washington as her husband started his new job. But she now is settling into the family's new Oakton, Va., home with some of the couple's eight children. "It has never been ruled out nor has it been seriously considered before she got settled in her new home," one aide said.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
The White House, in an apparent softening of its position on a major environmental problem, has dropped its opposition to a formal treaty-negotiating process on global warming, it was learned Thursday. Until now, the United States had been alone among major Western economic powers in opposing such an initiative. The change of position was outlined in a cable dispatched Thursday to U.S. delegates at an environmental conference in Geneva sponsored by the United Nations. Saying it was essential for the United States to exercise a leadership role, the cable said, "We should seek to develop full international consensus on necessary steps to prepare for a formal treaty-negotiating process."
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | From United Press International
Gov. George Deukmejian, a strong Republican supporter of President Bush in last year's presidential campaign, has complained to White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu about the planning for the President's recent trip to California, it was reported today. Citing informed sources, the Washington Post said Deukmejian sent a letter to Sununu expressing his unhappiness with the failure of the White House staff to schedule time for him to meet with Bush while the President was in the state.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney today played down an apparent disparity between his assessment of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's chances of implementing reforms and the opinion held by President Bush. "The President and I were in a meeting yesterday and frankly chuckled at what has developed by way of press commentary on views that we have expressed. We do not perceive a significant difference in terms of our views of the situation with respect to the Soviet Union," Cheney told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
May 1, 1989
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu said President Bush has told him that there was no quid pro quo discussion of expedited military and economic aid to Honduras in return for that country's assisting the Nicaraguan Contras when Bush met then-President Roberto Suazo Cordova there in March, 1985. Documents released at the Oliver L. North trial have implied that Bush played some role in a U.S. plan to expedite aid to Honduras in return for its assistance to the Contras. White House officials said secret documents will be released to buttress the claim that Bush's visit was not part of the quid pro quo deal.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
The White House, in an apparent softening of its position on a major environmental problem, has dropped its opposition to a formal treaty-negotiating process on global warming, it was learned Thursday. Until now, the United States had been alone among major Western economic powers in opposing such an initiative. The change of position was outlined in a cable dispatched Thursday to U.S. delegates at an environmental conference in Geneva sponsored by the United Nations. Saying it was essential for the United States to exercise a leadership role, the cable said, "We should seek to develop full international consensus on necessary steps to prepare for a formal treaty-negotiating process."
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush said today he "learned a lot" from his just-completed six-state tour, designed to enhance his activist image 100 days into his tenure, and took a slap at unflattering reporting of the trip. "In terms of problem-solving, Washington . . . does not automatically know best," Bush told a gathering of the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council, a business-oriented group of state legislators. Apparently referring to news accounts that described his trip as themeless, disoriented and jumbled, Bush said: "It's a very important thing for a President to get outside the White House and move around this country.
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