Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStaffs
IN THE NEWS

Staffs

BUSINESS
May 10, 1992
Granted, the computer has done many spectacular things for business as it has slithered its way into the workplace--but at what price, "The Productivity Paradox" (March 8)? Virtually all high-priced engineering staffs have a "confuser." If I wanted to sit at a keyboard two-thirds of my day, I would have acquired a B.S. degree in secretarial science. In giving their staff computers, these large aerospace firms, have taken away the clerical help and reassigned it to the person making $25 an hour.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997
After reading the story about Dr. Astrid Heger's work in the county-USC Violence Intervention Program (Voices, June 7) I have to ask our Los Angeles County supervisors this question: With your bloated salaries and perks, what can you and your overgrown staffs possibly be doing that justifies endangering the budgetary needs of the County-USC Violence Intervention Program? Why should the director of this program have to spend so much of her time raising money and why should such a burgeoning program have to get by with a staff recruited five years ago to handle a caseload one-fifth of their present burden?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1995
The slow economy and rising newsprint costs caused Copley Los Angeles Newspapers to lay off almost 40 employees Monday from its three daily publications in the area--the Daily Breeze in Torrance, the Outlook in Santa Monica and the News-Pilot in San Pedro--company officials said. Another 20 positions have been cut through attrition, said James Box, editor of Copley's Los Angeles publications. Publisher Thomas J. Wafer Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1988
I noticed in your article on Gov. George Deukmejian's signing of bills during the crunch period that occurs every September, your reporter stated, "Deukmejian is known to be a governor who actually reads the bill in their entirety unlike his predecessors Edmund G. Brown and Ronald Reagan who relied heavily on their staffs for advice on relatively routine legislation" (Part I, Sept. 26). Nothing could be further from the truth about Gov. Brown. I know; I served as his deputy legislative secretary and as his chief of staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2000
I don't know what qualifies Bruce Crawford to pontificate on teachers' salaries and conclude that teachers should demand privatization because "only through privatization can the market do rationally what the union is futilely trying to do arbitrarily and contentiously" (Orange County Voices, June 4). That kind of warped thinking usually comes out of a Heritage Foundation supporter. According to the NBC Evening News, this country needs 2.2 million teachers over the next 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1998
Your Dec. 28 editorial, "Running the County," mentioned how a 30-person commission determined that the "Board of Supervisors should set policy and let a strong CEO carry it out." While I agree that a strong CEO is necessary for effective county government, I'm in complete disagreement with the final part of your editorial that said, "The supervisors have staffs large enough to keep them apprised of what is going on in the county. They shouldn't be micro-managing, but they should be supervising."
SPORTS
October 13, 1985 | United Press International
"Wait till next year" isn't just an empty baseball cliche in Cincinnati. It's the gospel. The surprising Reds, the most improved team in baseball in 1985, figure to be a solid pennant contender in 1986. Picked by many to finish next to last this year in the National League West, the Reds wound up a solid second and kept the heat on the division-winning Los Angeles Dodgers until the final week of the season. Cincinnati, after a 70-92 record in 1984, improved to 89-72 this year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|