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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
Cheers to the San Diego Repertory Theatre for putting the Christmas spirit into its 14th edition of "A Christmas Carol" on the Lyceum Stage. The theater could have trotted out the same heartwarming success that "A Christmas Carol" has always been--especially at the end of a tough, controversial season like the one just past.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By David Ng
This post has been updated. "Picnic," the 1953 Pulitzer Prize-winning play by William Inge, is getting a rare revival on Broadway from the Roundabout Theatre with a cast of young, good-looking actors paired alongside more seasoned veterans. Maggie Grace, who appeared in NBC's "Lost" and the "Twilight" movies, stars alongside Sebastian Stan, who was in the shortlived USA series "Political Animals. " They are joined by Ellen Burstyn (who was also in "Political Animals"), Mare Winningham and Elizabeth Marvel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | RAY LOYND
"Danes Are More Fun," it says on the kitchen refrigerator. Well, in the Grove Theater Company's "Vikings" at the Gem Theater, the eldest of three Viking descendants delivers the rub from his dying Viking heart: Danes are adventurers but slow to feel passion and capable of their deepest love when they mourn. The point is that these sentiments are carefully dramatized in the domestic, realistic side of this play about an American family of carpenters of Danish descent.
NEWS
April 30, 2008
'Coffee Will Make You Black': A stage review in Friday's Calendar section identified Michael Shepperd as the director of "Coffee Will Make You Black." The director is Nataki Garrett.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
There are no new stories, but there are new ways to tell stories. These come along when we are ready for them. But we don't know we're ready for them until they come along. See Ron Link's production of Bill Cain's "Stand-Up Tragedy" at the Taper, for example, and notice what an expert you have become, after years of watching TV, at processing dramatic information. At times it's like watching a play on fast-forward. Yet the message doesn't get garbled. It is not a message play, but it is a thoughtful one. The scene is a Catholic boys' school on a bombed-out block on New York's Lower East Side, well suggested by Yael Pardess' set. Playwright Cain once taught in such a school, and can probably remember the days when he charged into class every morning determined to "turn these kids around" by "challenging" them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
As things stand, Tony Kushner's "Millennium Approaches" is at once fascinating, enervating, innovating and in severe need of a ruthless editor. This work-in-progress (important cautionary words), which opened over the weekend at Taper, Too, is . . . well many things. It is a novel for the stage, of which we are offered the first three chapters. At 3 hours and 20 minutes, it is Part 1 of Kushner's larger "Angels in America." (Part 2 remains to be written.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Carlos Rodriguez Jr.'s colorful, cartoonish vision of '50s Los Angeles presents a vivid backdrop for Rene Rodriguez's staging of his own mystery, "Detective Sanchez, the Ortiz Case." At the Inner City Cultural Center, though, nothing comes close to the set's vitality. This piece of Chicano noir would seem to have real possibilities: Ricardo Lopez's Sanchez battles the bottle to solve a nettlesome murder and free a Chicano kid unjustly accused of the crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For definitive proof--as if any were needed--that we are no longer in the era of the literate and melodically tuneful love song, "Something to Shout About," a cabaret survey of the music and lyrics of Eric Vetro and Steven Shore, is on display at the Cinegrill. "Creative consultant" (presumably meaning director) Kristoffer Siegel Tabori tries to inject some dramatic plasma into the fairly lifeless Vetro-Shore opus, but the only singer in his trio with any theatrical drive is Mara Getz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
"Women," at the Callboard, is another entry in the genre of plays (see "I'm Not Rappaport" or "Duck Variations") about two old men who sit on a park bench and talk, talk, talk. This time, the men are Mexican-American, the park is in East Los Angeles, the ostensible subject is women, and the unmentioned subject is an affair that one of the men had with the other's wife, long ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Horner's "Suddenly This Summer," at the Melrose Theatre in Hollywood, looks like no other musical revue I've seen. The cast of 10 is a remarkably varied cross section of faces and figures: whites, blacks, Latinos, four little people. The singing voices are an interesting mix of dark and light, big and small. Horner's tunes aren't as distinctive. His music is in the pop mainstream--simple, solid, sometimes affecting, sometimes predictable.
SPORTS
August 29, 2003 | Alan Abrahamson and Randy Harvey, Times Staff Writers
U.S. sprinter Jerome Young acknowledged Thursday that he tested positive in 1999 for a banned steroid but competed at the 2000 Sydney Olympics after being cleared by U.S. track authorities even as the International Olympic Committee "strongly" urged U.S. Olympic and international track officials to investigate. Young, 27, of Fort Worth, who won the 400 meters Tuesday in the world championships at Paris and was part of the gold-medal winning U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In "Stand-Up Opera," B.J. Ward--soprano, actress, voice of Betty Rubble on the new "Flintstones"--teaches you a thing or two. Precisely how and when to emit an attention-grabbing "Brava!" during a performance of "Carmen," for example. Ward offers helpful statistics, such as the relative death rate of Puccini heroines (two out of three).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Presidential adultery, influence peddling, an aggressively political first lady, even suicidal aides--unprecedented lows for the executive branch? Sorry, it's been done. For sheer breadth of corruption, the scandal-plagued administration of Warren G. Harding reigns supreme. Yet Harding's story receives little attention, even from the new cottage industry of television pundits devoted to feasting on presidential politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a handsome revival, "The Hemingway/Dos Passos Wars" ironically depicts the toll of ideological conformity among prominent symbols of independence and rebellion--the left-wing intellectuals and writers of the 1930s. Ben Pleasants' literate cautionary drama uses the disintegrating friendship between John Dos Passos and Ernest Hemingway as a study in egoism and hypocrisy set against the moral litmus test of the Spanish Civil War.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Brothers Phillip and Treat are repeatedly told, "Let me give you some encouragement" by Harold in Lyle Kessler's play "Orphans." Harold means a hug, something he never received as an orphan. Phillip accepts the emotional crutch. Older brother Treat indignantly refuses. In this intriguing and difficult play about three very lost souls is a lesson in self-worth, survival and vulnerability.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When the kindly French homosexual known as Toddy takes in the elderly waif Victoria, he hatches a brilliant plan. She can't get a job as a legitimate singer, despite a voice that shatters glass. His own career in the gay nightclubs of Paris is waning. Toddy and Victoria may be down and out, but by God they have spunk. And as impresario and pretend drag queen, Toddy and Victoria will reverse their fortunes and become the toast of Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Nite Club Confidential" is "Sunset Boulevard" Lite, crossed with "City of Angels." It is a breezy film noir parody filled with period songs like "Goody, Goody" as well as new, period-style songs written by the show's creators, and it pre-existed those other two shows, first debuting at a small New York Theater in 1983.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Written while the playwright was ill, "The Cherry Orchard" was Anton Chekhov's final work, having its premiere at Stanislavsky's Moscow Art Theater only months before the writer's death in 1904. The play is a eulogy for a gentry whose day is passing. Stanislavsky called it a tragedy; Chekhov called it a farce. At the South Coast Repertory, director Martin Benson has delivered neither one.
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