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SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein
You know the sound a golf gallery makes when a five-foot birdie putt lips out? Ohhhhhhhhh. That's the groan that also accompanied the news that a rehabbing Tiger Woods would miss the Masters for the first time since 1994. That year, Jose Maria Olazabal triumphed on a 6,925-yard course, and Woods was voted "most likely to succeed" by classmates at Western High in Anaheim. Without Woods, there's no "Will he pass Jack Nicklaus" talk. There's less buzz. Fewer casual fans will tune in. CBS' Jim Nantz, during an appearance on "The Dan Patrick Show," called Woods' absence "the story that dwarfs all others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
While a Punch and Judy version of "The Taming of the Shrew" has possibilities, the Shakespeare play that would seem to work best with puppets is undoubtedly "A Midsummer Night's Dream. " And whole moonlit swaths of the Bristol Old Vic's production of "Midsummer," a collaboration with South Africa's Handspring Puppet Company, bewitchingly bear this out. The magic proves hard to sustain for this innovative revival, now at the Broad Stage through April 19, but not before luring us deep into the enchanted world of this supernatural romantic comedy.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
Almost as impressively as the Nashville Predators hovered around the net Friday, the Ducks circled around their beaten veteran goaltender Jonas Hiller after a 5-2 trouncing at Honda Center. Hiller, returning from a three-game hiatus that Coach Bruce Boudreau said he hoped would enhance the goalie's sharpness for the approaching Stanley Cup playoffs, gave up four first-period goals on nine shots. After a 14-game win streak from Dec. 6 to Jan. 12, Hiller is 6-8-3 since. SUMMARY: Nashville Predators 5, Ducks 2 He was replaced with 2 minutes, 55 seconds left in the period by the emerging rookie Frederik Andersen, who's gaining serious traction for playoff use with a 19-5 showing this season that included three consecutive wins in Hiller's absence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Quentin Tarantino is going unplugged. Having shelved plans to produce his script for the western "The Hateful Eight" after it was leaked online, the filmmaker will give fans a chance to experience it in the form of a live reading at LACMA on April 24. The "Pulp Fiction" and "Django Unchained" mastermind will cast and direct the reading of the script, which is set in a saloon in the middle of nowhere after a blizzard diverts a stagecoach from...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By David Ng
Shakespeare's "Henry V" begins with a narrator called the Chorus bemoaning the theater as "an unworthy scaffold. " The description turns out to be an accurate one for the Pacific Resident Theatre production, which takes place in a cramped, 34-seat space where actors and audience can practically touch hands without much strain. The tiny theater turns out to be a major asset in this production, which has been earning critical praise since opening last month, and has extended its run to May 11. Featuring minimal sets and actors clad in contemporary clothes, this fast-paced staging was the brainchild of Guillermo Cienfuegos, a veteran L.A. theater director who has worked numerous times with the Venice-based PRT. PHOTOS: Shakespeare 2.0 The bard on the screen Cienfuegos is actually actor Alex Fernandez, who pulls double duty in this "Henry V" by playing the Chorus.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Michael Robertson put the bag of chemicals in an inside pocket of his sport coat, the pump in the other. He snaked the tubes between the buttons of his shirt to the port in his chest. He adjusted his tie to cover them. Then he sat down in a cavernous room in the White House complex and pulled his chair close to the table, hiding the bulges. Robertson, an aide to President Obama, was meeting with top officials from federal agencies working to implement the Affordable Care Act. He was also in treatment for stage IV colorectal cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez and Ben Welsh
John Mireles spent six years preparing to become a firefighter. The Signal Hill resident took fire science classes and worked nights on an ambulance crew, in addition to his full-time day job. He said he passed the Los Angeles Fire Department written exam, made it through an interview and background check and reached the final stages of the hiring process. But last week he was among hundreds of candidates who received a terse, two-sentence email from city personnel officials: They would no longer be hiring from a pool of applicants who had advanced through a yearlong screening process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
He was a neurosurgeon, a shipping magnate, a pompous headmaster, an autocratic father: He was the self-inflated, often weaselly authority figure whose long, narrow, aristocratic face was as well-known in films and television as his name was obscure. James Rebhorn, a journeyman character actor seen most recently as the father of super-spy Carrie Mathison on "Homeland," died Friday at his home in South Orange, N.J., of melanoma, his wife Rebecca Linn said. He was 65. Rebhorn had more than 100 TV and movie credits, including roles in "Scent of a Woman" and "My Cousin Vinny" - both released in 1992 - and "Meet the Parents" (2000)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
In the next few months, Liza Minnelli will bring her new musical show, "Simply Liza," to Vienna, London, Paris and Amsterdam, among other places. There's one stage, however, on which this Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, Golden Globe and Tony winner has never set foot: Walt Disney Concert Hall. That'll change on Tuesday night, when "Liza With a Z" heads to downtown L.A. for a one-night-only performance of some of her favorite songs. Minnelli recently chatted about the show from her home in New York, on the eve of her 68th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
By 1991, Mike Kelley had emerged as a crucial artist in Los Angeles, at the head of a pack that had pushed into prominence in the previous decade. His riveting sculptures reassembled from ratty stuffed animals, crocheted dolls and other tattered children's playthings that he scavenged from thrift shops were also generating considerable critical attention far beyond the city. Then 36, Kelley was invited to participate in the Carnegie International exhibition in Pittsburgh, one of the oldest and most respected surveys of its kind.
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