Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStages Theater
IN THE NEWS

Stages Theater

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
And the Winner Is: Director-actor Tony Abatemarco won the first $5,000 Ted Schmitt Award for innovation in Los Angeles' smaller theaters Monday at Theatre LA's Ovation Awards. Ironically, Abatemarco is currently employed in large theaters on the East Coast, directing "Lucifer's Child" with Julie Harris, en route to Broadway. The production's Hollywood engagement was recently canceled.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Ten new plays produced by Latino theater companies from around the United States will have their world premieres in downtown Los Angeles in 2014, in the inaugural installment of a National Latino Theater Festival and Conference that's envisioned as a biennial event. The festival, still in its planning stages, came to light Tuesday when the National Endowment for the Arts announced a round of grants that includes $50,000 to the L.A.-based Latino Theater Company, which will host the gathering at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2001 | BY MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the founding force behind a storefront theater company decides it is time to get a life, it can be the death of the troupe itself. That was the fate of Alternative Repertory Theatre in Santa Ana last year when its two founders called it quits. There was no one able or willing to carry on, and ART was kaput.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2009 | Robin Abcarian
Forbes Hill, an animator from Los Angeles, was walking past Dupont Circle on Monday morning looking for an art gallery to visit when he noticed the Raging Grannies -- peace activists who set antiwar lyrics to familiar songs -- warbling away at a microphone on a makeshift stage. Then he spied a 25-foot-tall inflatable President Bush figure in a "Mission Accomplished" flight suit. People were chucking shoes at it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1999 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
From Richard Kaye, creator and artistic director of Glaxa Studios, the alternative theater complex on Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake, comes Cirxa, a new restaurant on the same block. With more enthusiasm than restaurant experience or money, he's turned a drafty barn of a space into somewhere to eat before the theater--eliminating the tension of wondering whether you're going to make the curtain in time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE
Oil's not all that lives--and dies--in this city where things are not always what they seem. On the one hand, this boom town, filled with spectacular high-rises and expensive civic sculpture, feels like a ghost town: clean streets, gleaming architecture, few people; on the other, it may be the only place in the United States where a grizzled cabbie would speak passionately about the theater as he drove us to a show that he said he "had to see."
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writer
In a small room at Los Angeles City College last week, a purple-stockinged dancer was somersaulting for a friend. Outside in the hall, two women discussing Ibsen and Chekhov strode quickly by, stepping around a young man constructing an almost tangible box in space with his hands. It was a typical scene at the college's Theater Academy--all high spirits and tangible energy. But in the academy's faculty offices, the mood was more somber.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1998 | MICHAEL GOTTLIEB
An Oak Park task force is ready to tackle the daunting challenge of raising up to $5 million to build a theater for the community and the school district. Last week, the Oak Park Visual and Performing Arts Task Force Building Committee received its nonprofit status and opened a checking account to begin banking donations. "Our fund-raising really has to go through four stages," said committee Chairman Larry Jordan. "We are right now at Stage One."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN, Churnin is a theater critic for the San Diego edition of The Times. and
A girl and a boy from warring social and economic classes fall in love. Murder results when the boy is blackmailed by one of his friends, who knows about the affair, for a pair of high-quality designer jeans that the boy has no way of getting. Call it the dark underbelly of "Valley Girl" or "West Side Story" a la Sherman Oaks Galleria. Based on a real story, it's one of the latest, hottest tickets--not in the United States--but at the Central Children's Theatre in Moscow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2000 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Within a year, Los Alamitos could have not one, but three new theaters to call its own. Eventually, the city could have an entire fine arts and performing arts complex. And it won't cost the city a dime. At least, that's what Fine Arts Commissioner Kent Johnson has in mind. Since joining the commission about 18 months ago, Johnson, a director of musical and community theater with more than 35 years' experience, has shepherded a five-year plan for the development of arts in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Michael C. Hall could commit to only six weeks in the Broadway production of "Chicago" last summer. But the producers of the long-running musical leaped at the chance to cast the co-star of HBO's "Six Feet Under" in the role of flamboyant trial attorney Billy Flynn, announcing his arrival at the height of the all-important tourist season with big ads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2002 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
The Laguna Beach City Council is expected to sign a 40-year lease tonight with the Festival of Arts, formally ending years of negotiations during which organizers threatened to move the popular summer event from the canyon compound it has occupied since 1932. The lease, the product of six years of negotiation, guarantees that 6% of the revenue generated by the festival will be spent on capital improvements, said Mayor Wayne Baglin.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2002 | JAN BRESLAUER
Playhouses aren't just for plays anymore. At least not if mime shows at two key Southland venues this summer are an indication. Geoff Hoyle's "Feast of Fools" closed recently at the La Jolla Playhouse, and Marcel Marceau opens at the Geffen Playhouse on Wednesday. In both cases, more such acts are likely to follow. La Jolla Playhouse and the Geffen Playhouse are unusual among the nation's regional theaters in their ongoing commitment to mime and the circus arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2001 | BY MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the founding force behind a storefront theater company decides it is time to get a life, it can be the death of the troupe itself. That was the fate of Alternative Repertory Theatre in Santa Ana last year when its two founders called it quits. There was no one able or willing to carry on, and ART was kaput.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | KARIN LIPSON, NEWSDAY
Back in 1969, theater-lover Betty Corwin, concerned that so many great performances fade into mere memories when the show closes, came up with a plan to preserve them for posterity: Why not videotape them and create a permanent archive? Approaching the head of what was then the New York Public Library's performing arts research center, she got a less than resounding go-ahead. "He said you've got three months, a desk and a telephone," Corwin recalled the other day. A salary?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | GERALDA MILLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Judge Greg Mathis isn't kidding when he says he's been there, done that. The tough-talking, popular television judge says he did what everyone else was doing to make it in the projects in his westside Detroit neighborhood during the 1970s. At age 11, he joined a gang. "I chose survival over what appeared to be the pie-in-the-sky American Dream that I never saw anyone reach," Mathis said. As leader of about 40 gang members, Mathis got into fights and stole cars.
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | DAVID NELSON
The journey from a stage dripping in simulated blood to a party area bathed in genuine champagne is a difficult transition to make, even for seasoned socialites. But just such a wild leap in moods was required of the 250 guests invited by the AT&T Performing Arts Festival to first watch Saturday's performance of the La Jolla Playhouse's production of "Ajax," and then ascend to the theater's deck for a sumptuous supper party.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
"I think of the best efforts of the '60s, of all the pain we went through. Now we find we're sinking to the bottom." They came neither to bury the '60s nor to praise them. But everyone at the black-theater conference at Stanford University who listened to C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nothing opened last weekend, so--since we're caught up with plays still running--there's an opportunity to let you know what's coming up at local companies. Some groups have already announced their seasons well into 2001; others don't let anybody know what they're doing until opening week. So expect this to be just an idea of schedules. Although several plays will open before Nov.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | MARTHA WAGGONER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carl Martin has scant patience for actors who strut and fret their hour upon the stage--even if they are performing Shakespeare. For this high school drama teacher, Shakespeare's plays are a rollicking good time. And everyone can join the fun with Martin's boxed versions of Shakespeare, edited for living room performance and containing appropriate props such as plastic daggers, horns and small coffins.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|