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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1990
Eduard Shevardnadze has lived under a dictatorship all his life. Where was his support for democracy when Stalin was his leader? Methinks Mr. Shev is jealous of the success Gorbachev has had in bringing changes and getting credit. Shevardnadze is not doing his country any favor with his tantrum. WILHELM SCHWEDLER Newport Beach
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OPINION
March 8, 2014
He may be the most fringe of all major party gubernatorial hopefuls this year, but Republican Tim Donnelly's long-shot bid to face off against Gov. Jerry Brown in November has drawn the most buzz from Times letter writers so far. And by buzz, I don't mean that the reaction to the outspoken Inland Empire Assemblyman has been favorable. Most recently, about a dozen readers sent scathing letters in response to Donnelly's comparison of President Obama to some of history's most murderous dictators.
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OPINION
May 4, 2005
Re "Stalin Has Foot Back on the Pedestal," May 1: Rehabilitating Josef Stalin is akin to glorifying and building statues to Adolf Hitler. Both brought order to their countries. Both were tyrants. While Germany has apologized and paid out billions as compensation, Russia continues to reject any responsibility for the 10 million to 20 million that Stalin murdered. What is this talk of "liberation" of Europe by the Soviets? While heads of state visit sites of the killing of Jews, will President Bush honor the victims of Stalin at one of the gulag areas?
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Seema Mehta and Chris Megerian
Republican gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly is standing by his comparison of President Obama's gun control policies to those of Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Kim Jong Il and other dictators, saying that government encroachment on citizens' rights amounted to tyranny. “Tyranny is the daily purpose of dictators, and I will not apologize for pointing out that our current president acts more like a dictator than a leader of a free people in a Constitutional Republic,” Donnelly said Tuesday in an emailed statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | JERRY HICKS
Ona Dokalskaite and Mykolas Paskevicius of Anaheim were artists on the run the first half of their lives. Their prolific body of work reflects the freedom of expression denied them under Soviet dictatorships. We sat in the west gallery of the Anaheim Museum as I listened to this engaging couple recall that difficult time. Surrounding us were dozens of their vivid pieces, contemporary but born from those early struggles. They still paint with enthusiasm; Ona is 86, her husband, Mykolas, is 90.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even post- perestroika, filming a movie isn't easy in Russia. Just ask Ivan Passer, the director of HBO's new "Stalin." "Looking back, I still don't believe we did it," said Passer, who is no stranger to the ways of what was the East Bloc. The director, whose American credits include "Cutter's Way," is Czechoslovakian. Passer recently recalled shooting one elaborate scene that takes place in a hall in the Kremlin.
BOOKS
December 2, 1990 | Jane A. Taubman, Taubman, professor of Russian at Amherst College, is the author of "A Life Through Poetry: Marina Tsvetaeva's Lyric Diary" (Slavica)
In Russia, history is politics. Today, as Russians struggle out of the Soviet period to the next stage in their history, each step demands judgments about (to rephrase Lenin) "What is to be undone?" Slavophile nationalists like Solzhenitsyn urge a return to Russia's pre-revolutionary historical course; Westernizers of the Sakharov school want to see her become a "normal" European democracy. Yet before they can move along either road, Walter Laqueur reminds us, Russians must exorcise the ghost of Stalin.
WORLD
November 2, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
When Russian businessman Yevgeny Ostrovsky decided to name his kebab joint Anti-Soviet Shashlik, he thought of it as black humor. It was a little tongue-in-cheek, a little retro, a little nod to the old-timers who still remembered when the meat grill, across the street from the famed Sovietsky hotel, was known by just that nickname. But it was also, in that ambiguous, extrajudicial way so common in today's Russia, a little bit illegal. Three applications for an "anti-Soviet" sign were rejected by the city without explanation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Martin Rubin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Molotov's Magic Lantern Travels in Russian History Rachel Polonsky Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 390 pp. $28 To say that Rachel Polonsky is a lifelong Russophile probably still understates the level of her engagement with the country that has so captured her imagination, heart and soul. This British journalist has written about its culture and experienced its realities, first when it was synonymous with the Soviet behemoth and then in the two decades of its more recent transformation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Stalin' in Moscow: HBO has come up with a fitting locale for the world premiere of its upcoming movie "Stalin." It will take place in Moscow on Nov. 7, the 75th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. In conjunction with the premiere, Russian television will broadcast a symposium on Russia's political future. "Stalin" stars Robert Duvall and will debut on HBO later in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Chris Megerian and Seema Mehta
SACRAMENTO -- Assemblyman Tim Donnelly, a Republican candidate for governor, on Tuesday likened President Obama to dictators such as Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin on the issue of gun control.   The comparison, issued in a tweet , included an image with two rows of portraits. The first one showed George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and others who Donnelly said "stood for gun rights. " The second had Obama alongside Hitler, Stalin and King George III as people who "stood for gun control.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Folk singer and political activist Pete Seeger , who died Tuesday at age 94, was more than a folk singer, of course. He also was a political radical, and for all the gentleness of his lyrics, he seemed to have been built around a spine of steel. Seeger was already a popular entertainer and political activist when on Aug. 18, 1955, he was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee , the witch-hunt tribunal that sought to ferret out information on what it deemed subversive activities.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Guess it will be some Thanksgiving at the Cheney household next week; one thing's for sure - there'll be more than one turkey at the table. In their latest bid to remake “Family Feud” as a reality TV show, older daughter Liz Cheney - who's running for Senate in Wyoming - happily threw her lesbian sister and her sister's wife under the campaign bus over the weekend. Appearing on “Fox News Sunday,” Liz Cheney touched the third rail of Cheney family politics by restating her firm opposition to same-sex marriage . Then, proving she has her daddy's gift for talking out of both sides of one's mouth, she added: “I love Mary very much.
WORLD
July 30, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A bronze statue of Soviet-era dictator Josef Stalin will soon rise five stories over the museum dedicated to his brutal legacy in the small Georgian town of Gori, where he was born in 1878, the Culture Ministry in the former Soviet republic announced Tuesday. The 20-foot-tall statue was toppled in the dark of night from its 30-foot pedestal three years ago as vestiges of the totalitarian era in the Caucasus republic were eradicated by pro-Western President Mikheil Saakashvili . It has since been lying on the grounds of a military base in Gori.
WORLD
April 6, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW — Josef Stalin ruled the Soviet Union for three decades, turning it from a backward agrarian country into a nuclear superpower — and a land of mass murder, political repression and gulags. After his communist successors acknowledged the brutality of his reign, Stalin's body was removed from its place of honor in a Red Square mausoleum and buried under the cover of darkness beneath the walls of the Kremlin. The harsher details of that history lesson might be lost on some Russian students, however, now that Stalin's face graces the covers of school notebooks that recently went on sale in Moscow and have become an immediate bestseller.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By Noel Anenberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Russians told this joke during Stalin's reign of terror: "Comrades, who was better leader, Premiere Stalin or Pres-ee-dent Hoover?" "Hoover, Hoover taught Americanski not to drink!" "But comrades!" spouted another, "Stalin taught Russian worker not to eat!" Russian classical composer Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-75), whose magnificent music was banned by Josef Stalin, may not have found the joke amusing. The Los Angeles Philharmonic recently performed the world premiere of the prologue to Shostakovich's "lost" opera "Orango," a pro-Socialist lampoon of an ugly, greedy, half-man, half-ape capitalist.
BOOKS
June 4, 1989
I read the review of Robert Conquest's "Stalin and the Kirov Murder" (Book Review, April 2) just after I had finished reading another book on the Soviet Union and Stalin's purges. The review mentions that Stalin, in his confidence of his power, "even warned Lenin's widow Krupskaia that the party would nominate another widow for Lenin if she continued to complain about the execution of her old comrades." Stuart Kahan, in his biography of Lazar Kaganovich, "The Wolf of the Kremlin," claims Kaganovich was the one who warned Krupskaya (his spelling)
NEWS
March 1, 2008
Times Book Prizes: An article in Friday's Calendar section about nominees for the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes listed the title of the book by nominee Andrew Nagorski as "Stalin, Hitler, and the Desperate Struggle for Moscow That Changed the Course of World War II." The correct title is "The Greatest Battle: Stalin, Hitler, and the Desperate Struggle for Moscow That Changed the Course of World War II."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2011 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's ironic that a book that looks to pull back the curtain on decades of conspiracy theories about UFOs and Nevada's infamous Area 51 may, in the end, become best remembered for launching yet another conspiracy theory. The book is "Area 51: An Uncensored History of America's Top Secret Military Base" by journalist Annie Jacobsen (a book that began as a two-part series in the Los Angeles Times Magazine in spring 2009). Jacobsen does as advertised. She had unprecedented access to former workers at the site, who filled her notebooks with details about secret doings (some now unclassified)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Martin Rubin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Molotov's Magic Lantern Travels in Russian History Rachel Polonsky Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 390 pp. $28 To say that Rachel Polonsky is a lifelong Russophile probably still understates the level of her engagement with the country that has so captured her imagination, heart and soul. This British journalist has written about its culture and experienced its realities, first when it was synonymous with the Soviet behemoth and then in the two decades of its more recent transformation.
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