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Stamp Dealer

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July 2, 1988 | ERIC SCHINE, Times Staff Writer
There is an old saying among philatelists: "A stamp is worth what a knave can make a fool pay for it." And while stamp dealers acknowledge that it is difficult to determine how much a collector will be willing to pay, many are astonished by the prices reportedly received by upstart stamp entrepreneur Marc Rousso. Rousso, a 38-year-old dealer who recently opened a Newport Beach office, has created a stir within the philatelic community with his widely publicized claims of big-ticket stamp sales.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 2001
Seven stamp dealers are accused in a lawsuit filed by attorneys general in California, New York and Maryland of working together to hold down the prices they bid for stamps at auctions. In a civil complaint filed Monday in Manhattan federal court, the states said the dealers schemed for nearly 20 years to fix auction prices. The dealers earned about $5 million in illegal profits, the states said.
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NEWS
May 8, 1986 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: While opening some old wooden boxes in my garage recently, I found a number of leather post cards. Some have the designs and pictures pressed and embossed on them, others are painted or printed. The leather is light tan. On many of them the post card is imprinted with lines for the address on one side. The cancellations are around 1900 or shortly after. A few still have Franklin 1-cent green stamps on them. Most were sent from towns in Minnesota.--G.A.D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2000 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dave Kleinman collects stamps. But not any old stamps. The 58-year-old collector from Monterey looks for British Commonwealth stamps, especially those from the South Pacific. Arcane? Maybe. But then there's 46-year-old Steve Inklebarger, who cares less about the stamps than he does the postmark covering the stamps. Inklebarger has come to Anaheim's World Stamp Expo 2000 in search of envelopes with postmarks issued by the Kingdom of Hawaii before the islands became part of the U.S.
NEWS
September 21, 1996
Jack Minkus, 94, a Polish-born entrepreneur credited with making stamp collecting popular in the United States. Minkus immigrated to America in 1929 and was publishing and selling miniature dictionaries with his brother when a stamp dealer showed them a stamp album from England. Realizing that they could manufacture album sets for less and sell more of them, the brothers hustled their clients into stocking the stamp books and accompanying bags of stamps. The new hobby item quickly caught on.
NEWS
January 2, 1986 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: About 10 to 15 years ago I started a stamp collection and invested about $3,000 to $5,000 in it. I purchased them through a reputable dealer at prices considerably below Scott values. Although I never expected to get rich with this collection, I did want to recover at least close to what I put into it, particularly because 15 years had passed. Last week I took my collection to a stamp dealer who was appraising collections. You can imagine my shock when he told me $100 or so.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: What tools do I need to start stamp collecting? I am retired on a limited hobby budget, but I think I would enjoy fiddling around with stamps for fun and possibly profit. What stamps are a good investment?--G.C. Answer: A stamp album, hinges, tongs, a magnifying glass and a watermark tray with fluid are the basic tools of the philatelist. Also you will need access to reference books and stamp catalogues indicating prices of various issues.
NEWS
August 21, 1986 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: Will you please send me the address for the topical society that concentrates on aircraft, especially commercial aircraft? I am a philatelist, not a speculator. I specialize in U.S. issues. Do you know of any poor, cheap Zeppelins?--J.K. Answer: For information on the American Air Mail Society, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to AAMS, 102 Arbor, Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077. To answer your other question, I'm not sure what you mean by poor and cheap.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: I have an extensive collection of U.S. stamps: blocks and sheets, all mint. Also, an almost complete collection of Vatican and Israel tab stamps, all mint and all book mounted. Is this a good time for me to sell? If so, what is the best way for me to get top dollar?--J.H. Answer: No, this is a bad time to sell valuable stamps. The stamp market has been sliding down for about five years and lately seems to have reached bottom, but of course nobody can be sure.
NEWS
January 23, 1986 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: What is the difference between mint and unused?--R.S.A. Answer: Mint means a stamp with original gum as issued, but the gum may be disturbed by such things as a hinge mark or fingerprint. An unused stamp has never been canceled but has none of its original gum. Mint stamps are obviously worth more because they more nearly approximate their original post office condition. Herman Herst Jr.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1997 | DALE HOPPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Scott Tilson and Jeffrey Franz knew nothing about selling postage stamps when they took a chance on Elvis. Five years later, they are inspiring disgust and respect with their innovative marketing of a hidebound hobby. They've even been sued by the Beatles. The two men already had decent businesses when they met in 1992 at a printer they were both using. Tilson, 33, sells rare coins and Franz, who gave his age only as late 40s, produces poetry anthologies.
NEWS
September 21, 1996
Jack Minkus, 94, a Polish-born entrepreneur credited with making stamp collecting popular in the United States. Minkus immigrated to America in 1929 and was publishing and selling miniature dictionaries with his brother when a stamp dealer showed them a stamp album from England. Realizing that they could manufacture album sets for less and sell more of them, the brothers hustled their clients into stocking the stamp books and accompanying bags of stamps. The new hobby item quickly caught on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Detectives watched silently as the owlish man sat thumbing through rare stamps at a collectors exposition at the Long Beach Convention Center. They thought they had the case licked hours later when they say he walked away with unpaid items in his briefcase. But Long Beach police didn't know what they were up against until hours later, when they walked into the one-bedroom apartment of suspect Richard Pulsifer.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | BARRY KRAUSE, Krause, a free-lance writer and a member of several national stamp-collecting organizations
Question: How can I tell if a stamp is genuine? I believe that I may have some rare counterfeits.--E.L. Answer: In addition to taking into account your own personal experience in handling and studying many examples of a particular stamp, you can show the stamp to a professional stamp dealer or another recognized philatelic expert. It is against federal law to buy, sell or own counterfeit U.S. stamps, and the U.S.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: I recently received a 25-cent green Paul Revere stamp on a letter, but after asking at my local post office I discovered that this stamp is no longer for sale. Aren't 25-cent stamps the current postage rate?--T.H. Answer: Yes, but they have to be stocked by the U.S. Postal Service in order for you to buy them.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | BARRY KRAUSE, Krause, a free-lance writer and a member of several national stamp-collecting organizations
Question: In a recent column, you used the word demonetized . I am an experienced collector, but I do not understand this term. Would you explain it?--W.C.P. Answer: Demonetization is the official governmental fiscal deprivation of the standard value of a medium of exchange. In common language, that means that money (or stamps) are no longer worth the face value that they had when issued. Shaky economies in some countries often lead to debasing or revaluing of the paper money.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Misprinted stamps worth thousands of dollars apiece were discovered by CIA employees who virtually cornered the market by taking 95 of them from the agency's supplies, a published report said. The CIA is investigating the nine employees for using their government positions for private profit, the Washington Post reported in today's editions.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
There are only two known to exist, and Jerry Buss, owner of the Kings, Lakers and Forum, had one. Monday night, he sold it. When the final auction hammer fell, Buss' 1867 U.S. postage stamp--known as the "1-cent Z grill" and coveted by philatelists worldwide--brought $380,000, the second-highest price ever paid for a single stamp. The winning bid came from Andrew Levitt, a stamp dealer from Danbury, Conn., representing an East Coast industrialist whom auctioneers did not identify.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | BARRY KRAUSE, Krause is a free-lance writer and a member of several national stamp-collecting organizations .
Question: What do you think of the newly revised prices in the Scott catalogues? Will their price cuts undermine the stability of the stamp market? --E.H. Answer: Until 1988, Scott catalogue values tended to be inflated as a long-standing custom whereby dealers and collectors negotiated the market prices of stamps at various "percentages" of catalogue value. For example, it was typical to buy reasonably nice British Commonwealth stamps in mint condition at half catalogue price.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | BARRY KRAUSE
Question: With the holidays upon us, I still have a few more last-minute gifts to buy. What do you recommend as presents for stamp collectors?--F.L. Answer: Stamp tongs, hinges, small glassine envelopes, perforation gauges, Mylar cover protectors, stock books, reference books on philately, a new stamp album or, of course, one of the standard catalogues of stamp values. All of these are for sale in local stamp shops (addresses listed under "Stamps for Collectors" in the telephone Yellow Pages).
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