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Stan Brakhage

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NEWS
April 10, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
To mark the recent death of Stan Brakhage, who cast a giant shadow in the world of avant-garde filmmaking, the American Cinematheque's Alternative Screen tonight is presenting Jim Shedden's 1998 "Brakhage," an illuminating celebration of the artist in his own work and words, as well as in the words, and in some instances images, of his friends and colleagues. A selection of Brakhage films also will be shown.
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NEWS
April 10, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
To mark the recent death of Stan Brakhage, who cast a giant shadow in the world of avant-garde filmmaking, the American Cinematheque's Alternative Screen tonight is presenting Jim Shedden's 1998 "Brakhage," an illuminating celebration of the artist in his own work and words, as well as in the words, and in some instances images, of his friends and colleagues. A selection of Brakhage films also will be shown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Stan Brakhage, one of America's most influential experimental filmmakers, died Sunday in a hospital in Victoria, Canada, after an eight-year struggle with cancer. He was 70. Over five decades, Brakhage made nearly 380 films, most of them shot in 8 millimeter or 16 millimeter and ranging in length from nine seconds to four hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Stan Brakhage, one of America's most influential experimental filmmakers, died Sunday in a hospital in Victoria, Canada, after an eight-year struggle with cancer. He was 70. Over five decades, Brakhage made nearly 380 films, most of them shot in 8 millimeter or 16 millimeter and ranging in length from nine seconds to four hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
Filmforum will present a program of films by Stan Brakhage, the master of cinematic stream-of-consciousness, at LACE at 8 tonight. For more than 30 years Brakhage has been creating meaning from a flow of highly eclectic images that seem to be linked only by free association. What in lesser hands would result only in a rag-tag, home-movie jumble emerges in his films as an intensely rhythmic vision of the universe as powerful as it is personal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Stff Writer
In "Andrei Tarkovsky: Poet in the Cinema," screening at the Nuart through Tuesday, veteran Italian documentarian Donatello Baglivo succeeded admirably in getting the late Soviet director, who was the most enigmatic and least compromising of film makers, to discuss with precision and clarity his work (which is glimpsed in generous, apt clips), his life and his credo. Tarkovsky believed we're on earth to "enhance spirituality" and that the purpose of art is to serve that end.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filmforum presents "June Weddings: Six Matrimonial Shorts," an amusing yet thoughtful offering in keeping with the season, tonight at 8 at LACE. Opening the program is Stan Brakhage's lyrical 1959 "Wedlock: An Intercourse," shot in the early months of his marriage and expressing the mystery, power and beauty of the onslaught of love in all its passion and tenderness.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010 | By Steven Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Jon Vickers was interviewing for his job as the first director of the new Indiana University Cinema, he was told there might be a tricky problem if he was hired. "The comment I heard frequently was, 'You'll have to figure out what to do with the Kinsey Collection, because it's different than all the others,' " Vickers says. "There was an assumption the programmer would work with the collection, but how to do that was a question for everybody. " And, as he prepares to open the college cinematheque on Jan. 13, it still is. The "Kinsey Collection" refers to the roughly 14,000 films and videos belonging to the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, which has offices on the school's Bloomington campus in southern Indiana.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Experimental films, shot on minimal budgets, usually at the film makers'--or a foundation's--expense, often eschewing plot and narrative, are probably the most refined and purified form of film poetics. They can be maddening and self-indulgent; they can be mesmerizing, eye-opening or exalted. Now, in the age of video, they may actually be an endangered species--or perhaps, with the help of cheaper video equipment, on the verge of changing into another, more financially accessible form.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
Filmforum will present a program of films by Stan Brakhage, the master of cinematic stream-of-consciousness, at LACE at 8 tonight. For more than 30 years Brakhage has been creating meaning from a flow of highly eclectic images that seem to be linked only by free association. What in lesser hands would result only in a rag-tag, home-movie jumble emerges in his films as an intensely rhythmic vision of the universe as powerful as it is personal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Stff Writer
In "Andrei Tarkovsky: Poet in the Cinema," screening at the Nuart through Tuesday, veteran Italian documentarian Donatello Baglivo succeeded admirably in getting the late Soviet director, who was the most enigmatic and least compromising of film makers, to discuss with precision and clarity his work (which is glimpsed in generous, apt clips), his life and his credo. Tarkovsky believed we're on earth to "enhance spirituality" and that the purpose of art is to serve that end.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS
Filmforum presents tonight at 8 at the Hollywood Moguls, 1650 N. Hudson, Barbara Rubin's 29-minute "Christmas on Earth" (1963), Carolee Schneeman's 22-minute "Fuses" (1967) and Storm De Hirsch's 10-minute "Third Eye Butterfly" (1968). The first two are landmark experimental films by women filmmakers in a candid yet lyrical depiction of lovemaking. Both attest to how durable the best of '60s underground filmmaking really is.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1986 | CLARKE TAYLOR
Independent film makers were formally--and, many independents would say, finally--recognized by the Establishment here Thursday with the first presentations of a new award, the American Film Institute Award for Independent Film and Video Artists. It was presented Thursday to video artist Nam June Paik, experimental film maker Stan Brakhage and animator Sally Cruikshank.
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