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Stan Chambers

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MAGAZINE
January 5, 1986 | PATT MORRISON, Patt Morrison is a Times staff writer
At a time when newsroom reporters jump from channel to channel, Stan Chambers remains a fixture at KTLA, where he's worked since 1947. He has nearly four decades of the city's news history in his film cans. Yet, at age 62, he sometimes scrambles for a half-dozen stories before midnight as the station's only nightside man. He has 11 children, three Emmys and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
"It's time to go. " During the late stages of an honored career that spanned more than six decades, KTLA-TV Channel 5 newsman Stan Chambers rarely considered those words in regards to stepping away from the job and station he loved. He was continually energized by covering news all around Southern California and having a front-row seat to some of the most memorable events in Los Angeles history. Plus, he was having too much fun. But Wednesday, the seemingly tireless 87-year-old Chambers, who covered numerous floods, fires, earthquakes and other catastrophes, will tell his beloved colleagues, friends and viewers that he is leaving the only TV station he's ever worked at, closing a chapter on a resume that began in 1947 and logged more than 22,000 stories.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1985
Stan Chambers, who has been reporting for KTLA Channel 5 since 1947--the year the station began broadcasting--has been chosen to receive the 1985 Los Angeles Area Governors Emmy Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Chambers will receive the special Emmy at the academy's June 1 banquet to present the local Emmy Awards for 1985. The Governors Award is meant to honor individuals, shows or organizations that have made unique contributions to television in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
George Putnam, the pioneer television news anchorman and conservative commentator whose distinctive stentorian voice was a mainstay of Southern California broadcasting for decades, has died. He was 94. Putnam, who had been suffering from a kidney ailment since December, died early Friday morning at Chino Valley Medical Center, said Chuck Wilder, Putnam's cohost, producer and announcer. Beginning at KTTV Channel 11 in the early 1950s, Putnam quickly became a dominant and influential force in Los Angeles TV news.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1993 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Chambers already has finished editing a feature and filing a report from Dorsey High School on a parents' meeting with police officials in the wake of a shooting just outside the campus. Even so, it's been a slow day so far on the KTLA-TV Channel 5 night shift, and Chambers and his cameraman decide to take a break for dinner at their favorite Hollywood restaurant.
NEWS
March 2, 1986
Congratulations to KTLA for covering the unfolding Ontario Airport high-wire rescue in such an outstanding manner on Feb. 11. Hal Fishman and Stan Chambers were at their professional best. Too bad the other stations didn't have the gumption to interrupt normal commercial programming for the public interest. So what else is new? Yale Goodman, Anaheim
MAGAZINE
February 2, 1986
Muchas gracias , Patt Morrison. Your mini-portrait, "So Says Stan Chambers" ( Jan. 5 ), gives us an indispensable something old that validates an unpredictable something-new year. Harry Emerson Victorville
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2005
Longtime KTLA-TV Channel 5 reporter Stan Chambers will receive a lifetime achievement award from the Greater Los Angeles Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists at a July 30 dinner at the Hilton Hotel in Universal City. The event is open to the public. For ticket information, call Roberta Wax at (818) 993-7027. The deadline is Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1994
Paul Clarke did a marvelous job at recounting various events brought into his Washington home via television ("Gathering at the TV for a Communal Experience," July 17). However, it is important to remember that Southern Californians were the first to experience the medium's ability to bring people together. On April 9 and 10, 1949, Southlanders were transfixed by the effort to rescue 3 1/2-year-old Kathy Fiscus, who had fallen into a San Marino well. The legendary late television pioneer Klaus Landsberg dispatched a mobile unit and reporters Stan Chambers and Bill Welsh for what was destined to become 27 hours of continuous live coverage of an unscheduled news event.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Viper Gets Re-Fanged: The Viper Room, the Sunset Boulevard nightclub that's been closed for interior renovations since mid-November, will hold a grand reopening bash Jan. 9, featuring a benefit acoustic performance by Courtney Love and her Hole bandmate guitarist Eric Erlandson.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2005
Longtime KTLA-TV Channel 5 reporter Stan Chambers will receive a lifetime achievement award from the Greater Los Angeles Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists at a July 30 dinner at the Hilton Hotel in Universal City. The event is open to the public. For ticket information, call Roberta Wax at (818) 993-7027. The deadline is Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2002 | ANN CONWAY
For more than half a century, KTLA-TV broadcaster Stan Chambers has covered the Rose Parade in Pasadena. Missing only a few parades since 1949, Chambers, who's 79, has risen before dawn on New Year's Day, yanked on a pair of long johns, swaddled himself in woolly outerwear and set out to tell viewers about some of the world's most extravagant floral displays. As he prepared to do it for the 49th time, he reflected on parades gone by. The parade has evolved quite a lot in the years you've been describing it. What do you recall about covering the Tournament of Roses in the early years?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Viper Gets Re-Fanged: The Viper Room, the Sunset Boulevard nightclub that's been closed for interior renovations since mid-November, will hold a grand reopening bash Jan. 9, featuring a benefit acoustic performance by Courtney Love and her Hole bandmate guitarist Eric Erlandson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1994
Paul Clarke did a marvelous job at recounting various events brought into his Washington home via television ("Gathering at the TV for a Communal Experience," July 17). However, it is important to remember that Southern Californians were the first to experience the medium's ability to bring people together. On April 9 and 10, 1949, Southlanders were transfixed by the effort to rescue 3 1/2-year-old Kathy Fiscus, who had fallen into a San Marino well. The legendary late television pioneer Klaus Landsberg dispatched a mobile unit and reporters Stan Chambers and Bill Welsh for what was destined to become 27 hours of continuous live coverage of an unscheduled news event.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1993 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Chambers already has finished editing a feature and filing a report from Dorsey High School on a parents' meeting with police officials in the wake of a shooting just outside the campus. Even so, it's been a slow day so far on the KTLA-TV Channel 5 night shift, and Chambers and his cameraman decide to take a break for dinner at their favorite Hollywood restaurant.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | STAN CHAMBERS
Pasadena is everyone's hometown on New Year's morning. Especially mine. It is a cold, damp and exhilarating ritual to be there in the milling, holiday crowd-and that has been my assignment for most of the years since 1949. I have been a reporter in the midst of the pre-parade preparations, enduring the hardships of the night and waiting for the first light of dawn. It is the only time of the year that I wear gloves and a scarf on television. Covering the Rose Parade has been a great KTLA tradition that continues today.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1987 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Back in 1947, Stan Chambers had visions of becoming an attorney. But when he went to register at the USC Law School, the line was so long that he chucked the idea. He wound up going to work at KTLA-TV Channel 5 just a few months after it had gone on the air as the first commercial television station west of the Mississippi.
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