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Stan Delaplane

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April 24, 1988 | JERRY HULSE
Stan Delaplane, who died Monday in San Francisco at the age of 80, was a particular breed of newspaperman who won't pass our way again. There is little doubt that his era has ended and the loss to us who knew, loved and admired him is like the closing line in a novel that's difficult to set aside. We traveled many miles together and he was an uncomplaining companion. I recall how even into his 70s, one night on a long flight to Samoa he gave his bunk to another and slept on the plane floor.
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TRAVEL
May 8, 1988
Jerry Hulse's moving tribute to Stan Delaplane, "30 for Stan Delaplane, a Maker of Memories" (April 24), will become a classic--or should be--for aspiring and practicing journalists. What a wonderful man Delaplane must have been. I read him assiduously, and Hulse made me wish that I had known him personally as well. Delaplane certainly set a standard for his profession: the prototype of the caring and concerned writer who functioned with style both in his personal and professional relationships.
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TRAVEL
May 8, 1988
Jerry Hulse's moving tribute to Stan Delaplane, "30 for Stan Delaplane, a Maker of Memories" (April 24), will become a classic--or should be--for aspiring and practicing journalists. What a wonderful man Delaplane must have been. I read him assiduously, and Hulse made me wish that I had known him personally as well. Delaplane certainly set a standard for his profession: the prototype of the caring and concerned writer who functioned with style both in his personal and professional relationships.
TRAVEL
April 24, 1988 | JERRY HULSE
Stan Delaplane, who died Monday in San Francisco at the age of 80, was a particular breed of newspaperman who won't pass our way again. There is little doubt that his era has ended and the loss to us who knew, loved and admired him is like the closing line in a novel that's difficult to set aside. We traveled many miles together and he was an uncomplaining companion. I recall how even into his 70s, one night on a long flight to Samoa he gave his bunk to another and slept on the plane floor.
TRAVEL
December 6, 1987
In the Stan Delaplane article of Nov. 22 there is a typographical error that renders it laughable to an aerospace engineer. The article states that the Concorde travels at mach 22. I believe you meant to say mach 2.2. The world knows of no hypersonic commercial transport at this point. RICHARD P. CARRANO Oxnard
TRAVEL
December 20, 1987
In the Stan Delaplane article of Dec. 6 there is a descriptive error that renders it laughable to any junior high geography student. The article says, "Here in Placerville, a two-hour drive northwest of San Francisco. . . . " North west ? On my atlas that puts it somewhere distinctly offshore. JUDITH A. ANDERSON Costa Mesa
TRAVEL
April 28, 1985
"Enormous brutes" indeed! Stan Delaplane (April 7) bases his entire silly column on an incorrect translation; bruits anormaux means "unusual noises." Go to the bottom of the class, Stan. Vous parlez francais comme une voche espagnol. ROSE MARIE PERRENOUD Los Angeles
TRAVEL
July 12, 1987
After reading the June 21 article by Stan Delaplane, who seems to be complaining as he obviously goes around the world throwing his cigarette butts everywhere, it is too bad that more countries do not have an instant, on-the-spot fine for this disgusting habit. I would like to ask Delaplane just what does he think happens to all the millions of discarded cigarettes that are tossed aside every single day, that the rest of us have to look at or clean up. VERONICA SEWELL Woodland Hills
TRAVEL
October 27, 1985
As a guy who has put the knock on Stan Delaplane often enough for his frequent inaccuracies, I feel impelled to defend him on this occasion. On Sept. 29 a reader complained that Delaplane had vilified the Finnish language. Your correspondent must be a Finn. When Delaplane contends that it seems to be a mix of Hungarian and undecipherable Mongolian, he is not original. Almost every observer, linguist or not, feels that is a fair description of that mysterious tongue. This is my only negative comment about the marvelous Finns.
TRAVEL
September 29, 1985
In his article on Finland Sept. 1, Stan Delaplane displayed a provincial and supercilious attitude toward that country and its language and culture. In addition to the offensive tone used, the piece contains many inaccurate statements, and the one regarding the language is the most insulting. The Finnish language is not "a strangely garbled mix of Estonian and Hungarian." It is a legitimate language in its own right, with a complex but well-organized and regular system of grammar, with 14 noun cases of. Finnish is an extremely eloquent and poetic language, and if Delaplane, in his ignorance, finds it garbled, it is his loss.
TRAVEL
December 20, 1987
In the Stan Delaplane article of Dec. 6 there is a descriptive error that renders it laughable to any junior high geography student. The article says, "Here in Placerville, a two-hour drive northwest of San Francisco. . . . " North west ? On my atlas that puts it somewhere distinctly offshore. JUDITH A. ANDERSON Costa Mesa
TRAVEL
December 6, 1987
In the Stan Delaplane article of Nov. 22 there is a typographical error that renders it laughable to an aerospace engineer. The article states that the Concorde travels at mach 22. I believe you meant to say mach 2.2. The world knows of no hypersonic commercial transport at this point. RICHARD P. CARRANO Oxnard
TRAVEL
July 12, 1987
After reading the June 21 article by Stan Delaplane, who seems to be complaining as he obviously goes around the world throwing his cigarette butts everywhere, it is too bad that more countries do not have an instant, on-the-spot fine for this disgusting habit. I would like to ask Delaplane just what does he think happens to all the millions of discarded cigarettes that are tossed aside every single day, that the rest of us have to look at or clean up. VERONICA SEWELL Woodland Hills
TRAVEL
November 16, 1986
Stan Delaplane's prescription for traveling in luxury (Oct. 19) is totally indulgent. He relates that because he forgot his prescription at home, his emergency Paris doctor wrote him a new prescription and dictated that he use a wheelchair which he did not really need, to get him through lines and customs ahead of the mob. We recently returned from Paris. On board were four paraplegic tennis players. These young people required assistance getting on and off the airplane and getting back and forth to the restroom.
TRAVEL
October 27, 1985
As a guy who has put the knock on Stan Delaplane often enough for his frequent inaccuracies, I feel impelled to defend him on this occasion. On Sept. 29 a reader complained that Delaplane had vilified the Finnish language. Your correspondent must be a Finn. When Delaplane contends that it seems to be a mix of Hungarian and undecipherable Mongolian, he is not original. Almost every observer, linguist or not, feels that is a fair description of that mysterious tongue. This is my only negative comment about the marvelous Finns.
TRAVEL
September 29, 1985
In his article on Finland Sept. 1, Stan Delaplane displayed a provincial and supercilious attitude toward that country and its language and culture. In addition to the offensive tone used, the piece contains many inaccurate statements, and the one regarding the language is the most insulting. The Finnish language is not "a strangely garbled mix of Estonian and Hungarian." It is a legitimate language in its own right, with a complex but well-organized and regular system of grammar, with 14 noun cases of. Finnish is an extremely eloquent and poetic language, and if Delaplane, in his ignorance, finds it garbled, it is his loss.
TRAVEL
June 9, 1985
Stan Delaplane (May 12) missed the best bargain in York, the two-hour free walk through town led by the Volunteer Guides of York. Ours was a retired military person, all blustering enthusiasm, with dark-red mustachios waxed to wicked pinpoint ends. He had great pride in the fighting past of York, insisting that all British revolts began with Yorkshiremen. . . . Our military friend was proud that the 9th Legion disappeared from Roman records after it left York. In York, Saxon King Harold was celebrating a great victory over the Danes at nearby Stamford Bridge when William the Conqueror landed from Normandy and undid the victory party.
TRAVEL
September 22, 1985
We went to Stan Delaplane's fairly recent recommendation in York, England, the Grapevine restaurant in Grape Lane. It closed two years ago! In its place, however, is Dominic's, where we had a very good dinner and recommend it highly. The chef is from Belgium, the prices fair. This recommendation of Delaplane makes me question his validity. Also in York, the Welsh rarebit served at Betty's Tea Room is every bit as delicious as purported. For anyone in the area of Paignton, a part of Torbay, the English Riviera, we highly suggest lunch or tea at Paega's Pantry opposite the post office on Torbay Road.
TRAVEL
June 9, 1985
Stan Delaplane (May 12) missed the best bargain in York, the two-hour free walk through town led by the Volunteer Guides of York. Ours was a retired military person, all blustering enthusiasm, with dark-red mustachios waxed to wicked pinpoint ends. He had great pride in the fighting past of York, insisting that all British revolts began with Yorkshiremen. . . . Our military friend was proud that the 9th Legion disappeared from Roman records after it left York. In York, Saxon King Harold was celebrating a great victory over the Danes at nearby Stamford Bridge when William the Conqueror landed from Normandy and undid the victory party.
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