Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStan Freberg
IN THE NEWS

Stan Freberg

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1994
Humorist Stan Freberg, whose topical 90-second commentaries are heard in 90 cities around the country and in 130 other countries, has moved to KJQI-AM (1260) and KOJY-AM (54O). He had been heard for the past three years on news station KNX-AM (1070). Freberg's witty commentaries will air weekdays at 9:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. at the two adult standards stations, which are owned jointly and simulcast the same material.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
When Norman Corwin died a year ago, he was a mere stripling of 101 years. His father had lived until 110 and his brother, Emil, to 107. Norman was the "poet laureate of radio," a shorthand phrase for a very big life. He was the subject of an Oscar-winning documentary and was an Oscar nominee himself for his screenplay for "Lust for Life," and was a superlative writer in any medium, from plays to limericks. His radio program for the 150th anniversary of the Bill of Rights, which aired barely a week after the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, had a cast that included Orson Welles, Jimmy Stewart, Lionel Barrymore-- and President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivering the wrap-up remarks.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Arriving for lunch, Stan Freberg paused to greet an old friend, a woman from CBS who remembered "The Matter of the Harp." It was a long time ago, in the '50s, when his radio show was a summer replacement for Jack Benny's. He was planning a sketch called "Gray Flannel Hat Full of Teen-Age Werewolves." It satirized some current movies, but the big bang was that the otherwise normal werewolf turned into an advertising man when the sun rose.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were two bastions of American satire in the 1950s: Mad magazine and Stan Freberg. A comic book and some goofy recordings might not sound like the makings of a revolution, but in a decade of regimentation, their irreverence and skepticism were a lifeline for anyone who didn't buy into Madison Avenue and the mass media. With their national distribution and easy availability, both helped stitch together a nonconformist community that presaged the coming counterculture.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Stan Freberg, the free-form satirist who first caught the national ear with his wonderfully spoofy radio shows and then proved that chow mein commercials could be funny, returns to radio today. He makes his debut as a commentator in some amusing if non-poisonous 90-second sound bites on KNX-AM (1070) locally and in syndication nationally. The strip, called "Stan Freberg Here," will air four times daily on KNX at 4:42 a.m. and p.m. and at 11:42 a.m. and p.m.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | Sharon Bernstein
Everywhere he goes, Stan Freberg discovers new fans. At a blue-suit business dinner in Sacramento last month, a middle-aged man dragged an orange crate full of records, books and old copies of Mad magazine up to the wildly white-haired comedian for autographs-on all of the items. And Freberg, being Freberg, obliged. He's the man credited with inventing the humorous TV commercial, who wrote for Mad magazine as well as commercial television networks, whose musical-comedy version of U..
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Stan Freberg--comedian, satirist and ad man extraordinaire --is clearly one of our national treasures. A very funny man, he has regularly been called a genius over the last few decades and picked up a truckload of awards, including 21 Clios--which honor excellence in advertising, a Grammy and the Cannes Film Festival Grand Prize. Freberg might secretly agree with that "national treasure" business.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stan Freberg is standing in the memorabilia-filled office of his Mediterranean-style Beverly Hills home, choosing favorite segments of his new Thanksgiving radio special to preview for a visitor. Winnowing out the best stuff is no easy task. "Face-lift the Nation" features a panel of plastic surgeons--moderated by Serge Procedure--debating which nose has best suited superstar Michael Jackson. "Question: Is Michael Jackson's final nose more interesting than his original nose?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | ALLAN JALON, Times Staff Writer
On Liberty Weekend, Cable News Network presented a woolly-haired screen sage who chided corporate America for co-opting the event. He expressed gratitude that companies had stopped just short of rewriting the most-honored words of the moment into a sales pitch. And then, being Stan Freberg, the sage showed how easy that would be: "Give me your tires, your Porsche, your huddled nasal passages yearning to breathe free." It was satire for the masses. It was old hat for Freberg.
BOOKS
March 12, 1989 | Lawrence Christon, Christon is a Times staff writer.
Of the variety of motives for writing autobiography, revenge has to rank high among them. "It Only Hurts When I Laugh" is comedy/song/commercial writer Stan Freberg's look back at a career that has been a strange mix of spectacular achievement and peculiar unacknowledgment. Or dis-acknowledgement. Part of that may have to do with his uncategorizable, protean talents.
MAGAZINE
June 21, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
By now, some biologist must have worked out a comedic taxonomy for the varied species of rictus Americanus: The comic: Punch line Muzak for the change-of-feathers at Minsky's. Rim-shot warmups for the early-bird lounge show, inaudible over the ice in the highball glasses. Ba-da-boom, ba-da-bing. The comedian: Performance-driven, marquee-billed. This guy is the show. Think Richard Pryor. Think Steve Martin before he started writing and got promoted to . . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1996
Satirist Stan Freberg will appear Saturday at 2 p.m. at Brentano's Bookstore in the Century City Shopping Center, 10250 Santa Monica Blvd. Freberg will sign copies of his comic CDs "Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America, Vols. 1 and 2."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1996 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Freberg looks like a subdued Uncle Sam as he strolls into a Beverly Hills restaurant in a dark blue jacket, red shirt and matching pocket handkerchief, and a necktie emblazoned with small American flags. The get-up is no surprise--the silver-haired satirist is celebrating Rhino Records' release of his "The United States of America Vol. 2," an event that fans of recorded comedy have awaited with growing impatience for more than three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1994
Humorist Stan Freberg, whose topical 90-second commentaries are heard in 90 cities around the country and in 130 other countries, has moved to KJQI-AM (1260) and KOJY-AM (54O). He had been heard for the past three years on news station KNX-AM (1070). Freberg's witty commentaries will air weekdays at 9:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. at the two adult standards stations, which are owned jointly and simulcast the same material.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stan Freberg is standing in the memorabilia-filled office of his Mediterranean-style Beverly Hills home, choosing favorite segments of his new Thanksgiving radio special to preview for a visitor. Winnowing out the best stuff is no easy task. "Face-lift the Nation" features a panel of plastic surgeons--moderated by Serge Procedure--debating which nose has best suited superstar Michael Jackson. "Question: Is Michael Jackson's final nose more interesting than his original nose?"
NEWS
March 8, 1991
Thousands of miles from home, Gulf troops are getting a LITTLE LOCAL HUMOR. Los Angeles-based radio satirist Stan Freberg's syndicated program--heard locally on KNX radio--is also broadcast internationally via Armed Forces Radio in the Persian Gulf. When the humorist learned that his show was being heard in the Gulf, he says, he began to tailor more of his material to the troops. Among his lines: Returning troops should avoid SAND in any form: no SAND-ra Dee movies, no SANDwiches.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1996 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Freberg looks like a subdued Uncle Sam as he strolls into a Beverly Hills restaurant in a dark blue jacket, red shirt and matching pocket handkerchief, and a necktie emblazoned with small American flags. The get-up is no surprise--the silver-haired satirist is celebrating Rhino Records' release of his "The United States of America Vol. 2," an event that fans of recorded comedy have awaited with growing impatience for more than three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1996
Satirist Stan Freberg will appear Saturday at 2 p.m. at Brentano's Bookstore in the Century City Shopping Center, 10250 Santa Monica Blvd. Freberg will sign copies of his comic CDs "Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America, Vols. 1 and 2."
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | Sharon Bernstein
Everywhere he goes, Stan Freberg discovers new fans. At a blue-suit business dinner in Sacramento last month, a middle-aged man dragged an orange crate full of records, books and old copies of Mad magazine up to the wildly white-haired comedian for autographs-on all of the items. And Freberg, being Freberg, obliged. He's the man credited with inventing the humorous TV commercial, who wrote for Mad magazine as well as commercial television networks, whose musical-comedy version of U..
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Stan Freberg, the free-form satirist who first caught the national ear with his wonderfully spoofy radio shows and then proved that chow mein commercials could be funny, returns to radio today. He makes his debut as a commentator in some amusing if non-poisonous 90-second sound bites on KNX-AM (1070) locally and in syndication nationally. The strip, called "Stan Freberg Here," will air four times daily on KNX at 4:42 a.m. and p.m. and at 11:42 a.m. and p.m.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|