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Stan Getz

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The summer "Jazz at the Bowl" season ended Wednesday with neither a bang nor a whimper, but somewhere in the middle, with an unostentatious but generally satisfying program dedicated to the memory of saxophonist Stan Getz, who was originally scheduled to be the main attraction. Getz died in June following a long bout with liver cancer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Oscar Castro-Neves, a Brazil-born guitarist who helped to create the cool, sensuous rhythms of bossa nova and orchestrated music for movies including "L.A. Story" and "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels," has died. He was 73. Castro-Neves had cancer and died Friday in Los Angeles, his wife, Lorraine Castro-Neves, said. Castro-Neves, who was noted for both his virtuosity and his impish sense of humor, toured with jazz greats Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Getz. For 10 years, he was guitarist, musical director and vocal coach for Sergio Mendes' Brasil '66 and went on to produce albums by luminaries as varied as cellist Yo-Yo Ma and jazz harmonica player Toots Thielemans.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Recorded in 1987 at Copenhagen's Cafe Montmartre, this companion volume to the award-winning "Anniversary" offers consistently sensitive readings by a flawless quartet--with Kenny Barron, piano; Rufus Reid, bass, and Victor Lewis, drums. They play three standards, Barron's "Voyage," and Victor Feldman's elegiac "Falling in Love." At every level--tone, time, phrasing, undiluted passion--Getz sustains the artistic and emotional peak he reached in his last years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Teddy Charles, a jazz vibraphonist who performed with Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Charles Mingus and other bebop-era jazz greats before becoming a charter boat captain in the Caribbean, died Monday at Peconic Bay Medical Center in Riverhead on New York's Long Island. He was 84. Charles died of complications from heart disease, according to a niece, Sally Phillips. Although he was grouped with Milt Jackson and Terry Gibbs as a premier vibraphonist of the bebop years reaching from the late 1940s through the '50s, Charles was also well-regarded as a pianist and composer whose cutting-edge recordings of the mid-1950s were forerunners of the avant-garde jazz of the following decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
**** STAN GETZ/KENNY BARRON "People Music" Verve This two-disc set, completed at the Montmartre in Copenhagen exactly three months before Getz died last year, was a superlative swan song. Always an emotionally charged artist, he seemed more impassioned than ever, as if giving his all while it could still be given. Getz insisted on equal billing for pianist Barron, who as accompanist-soloist consistently rewards.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jazz saxophonist Stan Getz, who set off the bossa nova rage of the early 1960s, reviving a career that was almost shattered by drugs a decade earlier, died at his Malibu home Thursday. The noted 64-year-old musician had been in and out of St. John's Hospital and Health Center in Santa Monica for treatment in a battle with liver cancer over about five years, his son Steve said.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL
These are the sessions that established tenor man Getz, fresh out of Woody Herman's "Four Brothers" sax section, as a bandleader in his own right and as a pilot in the then-new, "Cool School" of jazz. Getz's dreamy, cloud-like tone paired with intelligent, deceptively clever improvisations and an ethereal atmosphere--particularly on ballads such as "My Old Flame" and the original composition "Mar-Cia"--hallmarked his early output.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2002 | DON HECKMAN
Stan Getz would have been 75 on Saturday. But he never came close to reaching that milestone, dying of cancer on June 6, 1991, in Malibu. Sixty-four years may seem considerable for a jazz life, when one considers the more brief spans of Charlie Parker, Lester Young and John Coltrane, to name only a few. But few artists ever have enough time, regardless of what they are allotted, to fully fill in the details of their creative visions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1999 | DON HECKMAN
Getz and Byrd were briefly but inextricably linked in the early '60s by the arrival of the bossa nova. Both--and Getz, in particular--were attracted to a wide variety of other styles, but their collaboration on the 1962 album "Jazz Samba" was, for the broader pop music audience, at least, a career-defining outing. Getz was reportedly happy to move on to other music, but Byrd has retained a strong connection with Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | DON HECKMAN and Stan Getz
Three stars for Getz and pianist Kenny Barron, who bring vigor and life to some settings that often have the chilly atmosphere of a Chirico landscape. No stars to producer Herb Alpert for failing to provide Getz with material best suited to his skills. As one of the great, intuitive chordal improvisers in jazz history, the saxophonist always has done his best work with songs that allow him to stretch out, through and around complex harmonic charts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2012 | By Don Heckman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mike Melvoin, a pianist/composer/arranger whose credits reach from Stan Getz and Frank Sinatra to Michael Jackson and the Beach Boys, and who was the first active musician to serve as national president of the Recording Academy, has died. He was 74. A first-call pianist and keyboardist since the early 1960s, Melvoin died Wednesday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, said his daughter Wendy. He had cancer. In addition to his studio work, Melvoin remained strongly linked to jazz, his first musical love, performing on a regular basis in local clubs, frequently touring internationally and releasing numerous recordings of his own groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2011 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Bob Brookmeyer, a jazz trombonist, composer, arranger and educator whose multifaceted career reached from cutting-edge performances with Gerry Mulligan and Stan Getz to innovative big band compositions and highly regarded classes at the New England Conservatory, has died. He was 81. Brookmeyer died Thursday of congestive heart failure at a hospital near his home in Grantham, N.H., according to his wife, Janet. He would have been 82 today. One of the few musicians who played the valve rather than the slide trombone, Brookmeyer created a highly personal musical identity for himself as a jazz improviser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Paul Motian, an influential and much-admired jazz drummer who first gained renown in the late 1950s as part of the Bill Evans Trio and later became a composer and the leader of his own groups, has died. He was 80. Motian died Tuesday at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City of complications from myelodysplastic syndrome, a bone marrow disorder, said Tina Pelikan, a spokeswoman for ECM Records. During his nearly six-decade career, Motian (pronounced like "motion") spent a substantial amount of time with two of the finest jazz pianists: Evans and Keith Jarrett.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Stan Getz was both the subject and the honoree in the performance of Don Menza's septet Thursday night at Charlie O's in Van Nuys. And what better way to honor the jazz icon than with a Four Brothers-style saxophone section and rhythm, featuring three tenor saxophonists, each displaying differing aspects of his multifaceted playing?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2002 | DON HECKMAN
Stan Getz would have been 75 on Saturday. But he never came close to reaching that milestone, dying of cancer on June 6, 1991, in Malibu. Sixty-four years may seem considerable for a jazz life, when one considers the more brief spans of Charlie Parker, Lester Young and John Coltrane, to name only a few. But few artists ever have enough time, regardless of what they are allotted, to fully fill in the details of their creative visions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As his compositions and piano playing were shaping jazz in the 1950s and '60s, it didn't occur to Horace Silver he was doing anything monumental. "In those years, I didn't realize just what it meant," Silver said from his Malibu home. "Sure, I always wanted to go down in history and do something important that would be remembered. But [when young] I never realized the importance my music would have."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Oscar Castro-Neves, a Brazil-born guitarist who helped to create the cool, sensuous rhythms of bossa nova and orchestrated music for movies including "L.A. Story" and "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels," has died. He was 73. Castro-Neves had cancer and died Friday in Los Angeles, his wife, Lorraine Castro-Neves, said. Castro-Neves, who was noted for both his virtuosity and his impish sense of humor, toured with jazz greats Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Getz. For 10 years, he was guitarist, musical director and vocal coach for Sergio Mendes' Brasil '66 and went on to produce albums by luminaries as varied as cellist Yo-Yo Ma and jazz harmonica player Toots Thielemans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1996 | Don Heckman
The linkage between books and records is helping to make stores like Borders and Barnes & Noble into profitable hangouts of the '90s. And, in a perfect example of the growing importance of that linkage, two Verve albums are being released in an unusual cross-promotion with two compelling biographies: "Stan Getz: A Life in Jazz" by Donald L. Maggin and "Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn" by David Hajdu.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1999 | DON HECKMAN
Getz and Byrd were briefly but inextricably linked in the early '60s by the arrival of the bossa nova. Both--and Getz, in particular--were attracted to a wide variety of other styles, but their collaboration on the 1962 album "Jazz Samba" was, for the broader pop music audience, at least, a career-defining outing. Getz was reportedly happy to move on to other music, but Byrd has retained a strong connection with Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask big-selling pop saxman Dave Koz to name his own favorite sax players and you might be surprised by the answer. "Stan Getz, definitely, and Phil Woods," replies Koz, who headlines the Newport Beach Jazz Festival on Sunday. "And Charlie Parker. I just immersed myself in his music when I was in college, memorized all the solos--just like every other sax player." One might have expected Koz to name David Sanborn or Maceo Parker instead of such mainstreamers. Forget it.
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