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April 1, 1995
The article on the 30th anniversary of Stan Laurel's death was of special significance to me ("Laurel Always Left 'Em Laughing," Calendar, Feb. 23). In the summer of 1957, I was saddened by the death of Oliver Hardy, whom I'd never met, and I vowed to somehow meet Laurel. With luck, I did have three memorable meetings with the comic genius at his Santa Monica apartment. His lovely wife, Ida, served us ginger ale and he showed me fan mail from China, Africa and virtually every corner of the globe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2009 | Larry Harnisch
Film comic Stan Laurel's brief marriage to Russian singer Vera Ivanova Shuvalova was another fine mess. For a little more than a year, they drank, they fought, they got arrested and -- at least according to Shuvalova -- Laurel invited her to be buried alive in the backyard of their San Fernando Valley home. Laurel never made a movie titled "Ex Appeal," but if he had, the cast would have included former wife Lois N.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For decades, the rumors floated that the modest bungalow surrounded by a forest of tall trees in Redondo Beach had been the weekend hideaway of Stan Laurel--the skinny half of Laurel and Hardy. Real estate agents whispered to prospective clients viewing homes that this was where Laurel came to get away from it all. Neighbors boasted that the entertainer had rested his head inside the 1935 Colonial Revival bungalow on Curtis Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Dim lights reveal two bowler hats lying on the floor. As if moved by ghostly forces, the hats edge jerkily across the stage before zipping into the wings. It's a fittingly odd image to open "all wear bowlers," the weird, wacky, impressively innovative performance piece being presented by Center Theatre Group at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For decades, the rumors floated that the modest bungalow surrounded by a forest of tall trees in Redondo Beach had been the weekend hideaway of Stan Laurel--the skinny half of Laurel and Hardy. Real estate agents whispered to prospective clients viewing homes that this was where Laurel came to get away from it all. Neighbors boasted that the entertainer had slept at the 1935 Colonial Revival bungalow on Curtis Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2009 | Larry Harnisch
Film comic Stan Laurel's brief marriage to Russian singer Vera Ivanova Shuvalova was another fine mess. For a little more than a year, they drank, they fought, they got arrested and -- at least according to Shuvalova -- Laurel invited her to be buried alive in the backyard of their San Fernando Valley home. Laurel never made a movie titled "Ex Appeal," but if he had, the cast would have included former wife Lois N.
NEWS
November 2, 1985 | Associated Press
The Post Office will issue a stamp honoring comedians Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, postal spokesman Ralph Stewart said Friday. He said that neither the design nor the denomination had been decided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000
Ten gentle people who brought joy to the 20th century and made it worth living: Jack Benny, Irving Berlin, Charlie Chaplin, Aaron Copeland, George Gershwin, Oscar Hammerstein II, Stan Laurel, Ogden Nash, Norman Rockwell, Charles Schulz. HARRY LEVIN Woodland Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1996
The Hidden Creek Ranch situation finally clicked into focus for me, with the Feb. 20 story about the developer owing $1.4 million in taxes and the Messenger Investment Co. being down to "about six" employees. My analogy is Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy trying to hoist the grand piano up the outdoor staircase. Moorpark Mayor Paul Lawrason is probably legally correct in asserting, as I understand the story, that "first things first" means awaiting the result of the environmental impact report and specific plan.
REAL ESTATE
November 2, 2003
Enjoyed "The Burr of Scotland and the Whir of Cameras" (Oct. 26) on Cheviot Hills because it's where I grew up from 1930 to 1951 -- in those days, a wonderful place for kids. Not long after my parents' custom house was built on Glenbarr Avenue in 1938 (3,000 square feet cost about $10,000!), my sister, my best friend and I discovered a way to get into "The Laurels." Unoccupied, it was the former house of Stan Laurel. It was truly a marvelous place, very large. Two features I can still picture were a sizable bar that looked like a typical old-fashioned saloon, complete with long bar and swinging doors to both the saloon and its bathroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
On Nov. 30, the American Cinematheque celebrates the 70th anniversary of the beloved Laurel and Hardy musical holiday comedy, "Babes in Toyland," with a screening and a reunion of surviving members of the comedy including Payne Johnson and Dickie Jones. "Babes in Toyland" had a tumultuous voyage to the big screen. Producer Hal Roach's big-budget adaptation of the popular Victor Herbert operetta was beset with illness, confusion, directorial changes and on-set accidents.
HOME & GARDEN
October 14, 2004
Re "Best House in a Leading Role" [Oct. 7]: There can be peril for neighbors of movie houses too. In "Big Business," an early Laurel and Hardy movie, the boys get in a scramble with a guy in front of his house. He trashes their car, they trash his house. At the end, the house is nearly demolished. Producer Hal Roach liked to tell the story that the film crew set up in front of the wrong house, much to the consternation of the owners, who came home from vacation to find their house destroyed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004 | Susan King
Slapstick Symposium Kino, $30-$35 This "symposium" brings together four DVDs with 29 short films and one feature from silent comedians Stan Laurel (sans Oliver Hardy), Harold Lloyd and Charley Chase. The collaboration between Kino and Lobster Films, the leading film restoration company in Europe, used the best available film materials and state-of-the-art technology to bring these comedies to vibrant life. Stan Laurel Stan Laurel without Oliver Hardy? It's akin to Bud Abbott without Lou Costello or Sherlock Homes without Dr. Watson.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 2003
Dennis McDougal ("Fumbling the Franchise," Nov. 16) put his finger on it: True control, the desire for which steers businessman Edgar Bronfman Jr., is just an illusion. The platinum spoon with which he was born was filled with more than a fair dose of power and opportunity. But what was the dream? What is the dream? Surely not control itself. Amazingly, after colossal risk and failure, he is blessed with another opportunity to find a new rudder and right his personal ship. Michael Eidel Los Angeles I can only think of Oliver Hardy's frustrated remark to his pal Stan Laurel: "Here's another fine mess you've gotten us into!"
REAL ESTATE
November 2, 2003
Enjoyed "The Burr of Scotland and the Whir of Cameras" (Oct. 26) on Cheviot Hills because it's where I grew up from 1930 to 1951 -- in those days, a wonderful place for kids. Not long after my parents' custom house was built on Glenbarr Avenue in 1938 (3,000 square feet cost about $10,000!), my sister, my best friend and I discovered a way to get into "The Laurels." Unoccupied, it was the former house of Stan Laurel. It was truly a marvelous place, very large. Two features I can still picture were a sizable bar that looked like a typical old-fashioned saloon, complete with long bar and swinging doors to both the saloon and its bathroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000
Ten gentle people who brought joy to the 20th century and made it worth living: Jack Benny, Irving Berlin, Charlie Chaplin, Aaron Copeland, George Gershwin, Oscar Hammerstein II, Stan Laurel, Ogden Nash, Norman Rockwell, Charles Schulz. HARRY LEVIN Woodland Hills
MAGAZINE
December 7, 2003
Dennis McDougal ("Fumbling the Franchise," Nov. 16) put his finger on it: True control, the desire for which steers businessman Edgar Bronfman Jr., is just an illusion. The platinum spoon with which he was born was filled with more than a fair dose of power and opportunity. But what was the dream? What is the dream? Surely not control itself. Amazingly, after colossal risk and failure, he is blessed with another opportunity to find a new rudder and right his personal ship. Michael Eidel Los Angeles I can only think of Oliver Hardy's frustrated remark to his pal Stan Laurel: "Here's another fine mess you've gotten us into!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999 | JAMES E. FOWLER
In this week's Footnotes: The World Almanac lists hundreds of national and international organizations headquartered in the United States. And the San Fernando Valley is home to several--some familiar, some not. Here are a few: * Sons of the Desert, P.O. Box 8341, Universal City91608, is an organization dedicated to the appreciation of film comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. The organization was founded in New York in 1965.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999 | JAMES E. FOWLER
In this week's Footnotes: The World Almanac lists hundreds of national and international organizations headquartered in the United States. And the San Fernando Valley is home to several--some familiar, some not. Here are a few: * Sons of the Desert, P.O. Box 8341, Universal City91608, is an organization dedicated to the appreciation of film comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. The organization was founded in New York in 1965.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For decades, the rumors floated that the modest bungalow surrounded by a forest of tall trees in Redondo Beach had been the weekend hideaway of Stan Laurel--the skinny half of Laurel and Hardy. Real estate agents whispered to prospective clients viewing homes that this was where Laurel came to get away from it all. Neighbors boasted that the entertainer had slept at the 1935 Colonial Revival bungalow on Curtis Avenue.
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