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Stan Lee

ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2008
"IRON MAN" looks great ["A Hero Complex," March 9]. Marvel Studios looks like a winner. But Geoff Boucher overlooked the single biggest reason for Marvel's rebirth in Hollywood: the highly rated, 1992-97 TV show, "X-Men: The Animated Series." For 30 years Marvel Comics had had no luck translating its "serious" vision to film or television. Networks and studios didn't get it, or it was dumbed down. Then Fox Kids TV executives Margaret Loesch and Sidney Iwanter pushed through and supervised the first series that respected the creations of Stan Lee, Jack Kirby and their colleagues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | GEOFF BOUCHER
"Water can flow, and it can crash. Be like water, my friend." That was one of Bruce Lee's principles of combat, and it's the inspiration behind "The Nature of Water," an exhibit that opens Saturday at Nucleus ([626] 458-7477), the sleek gallery in downtown Alhambra. Four dozen artists channel the singular legacy of Lee, who died nearly 35 years ago at age 32. Daughter Shannon Lee will be at the opening, which includes a Bruce Lee look-alike contest. Sounds cheesy -- though I might change my mind if the winner can do push-ups on his thumbs the way Shannon's dad used to. . . . Building on a Lee theme, Tuesday is the start of "Under the Influence: A Tribute to Stan Lee," an exhibit of 100 artists dedicated to "The Man Who Made Marvel."
BUSINESS
June 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stan Lee, creator of such comic book superheroes as Spider-Man and X-Men, has signed an exclusive content deal with Burbank-based Walt Disney Co. Under the multiyear agreement, Walt Disney Studios gets first shot at films, TV shows, books and video games devised by the 84-year-old Lee and his company, POW! Entertainment. Financial terms were not disclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2006 | Steven Barrie-Anthony, Times Staff Writer
It's a dark and stormy Tuesday morning in Hollywood, just the kind that draws villains -- purse snatchers, hobgoblins -- from their shadowy lairs to terrorize the gentle citizenry of this vast metropolis. Rain splatters the cavernous soundstages at Sunset Gower Studios and streams off the rooftops, turning sidewalks into rivers. On the street, a green van sputters and turns but won't start. And slowly, quietly, masked and caped men and women arrive.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Peter Paul, who co-founded Stan Lee Media Inc. with Spider-Man creator Stan Lee, on Thursday settled a Securities and Exchange Commission lawsuit accusing him of manipulating the company's stock. Paul, without admitting wrongdoing, agreed to refrain from future securities law violations and not to serve as an officer or director of a public company, the SEC said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Alex Chun
When the Fantastic Four make their big-screen debut on July 8, nobody will have a bigger smile than their postman, Willie Lumpkin. As readers of Marvel Comics already know, the bespectacled Lumpkin delivers mail to the FF's headquarters -- that would be the world-renowned Baxter Building. In the newest Marvel Comics superhero flick, Lumpkin is played by none other than Stan Lee, who together with illustrator Jack Kirby created the Fantastic Four way back in the early 1960s.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Marvel Enterprises Inc., which holds the rights to 5,000 comic book characters, settled a lawsuit with Spider-Man creator Stan Lee over film royalties and plans to start producing its own movies. The company said it had signed an eight-year agreement with Paramount Pictures, a unit of Viacom Inc., to distribute as many as 10 films, according to a statement Thursday. Merrill Lynch & Co. set up a $525-million credit line to fund production, a loan backed by limited rights to 10 Marvel characters.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Spider-Man creator Stan Lee, who spent two years in court fighting Marvel Enterprises Inc. for royalties from the characters he invented, said he expected to settle the case before a judge decided how much the company owed him. "All I'm looking for is a fair settlement," Lee said in an interview in his Beverly Hills office. "The last thing I would want to do is bankrupt Marvel. I love the company, and I love the people there." U.S.
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