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Stan Ridgway

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Stan Ridgway isn't one for obvious career moves, having abandoned the successful band Wall of Voodoo a decade ago for an uncertain solo career featuring wiseguy tales of urban despair that haven't exactly followed the usual Top 40 formulas. So if his new Drywall trio fails to cross over into the pop mainstream, maybe it's just because his songs are so strange, amusing and, well, interesting. On the new "Work the Dumb Oracle" album, the music has an industrial rigidness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2009 | Randy Lewis
"When we lose a member of our tribe, we don't mourn, we celebrate, and we make a lot of racket," Dave Alvin said at the outset of a 3 1/2-hour tribute to the late violinist, singer and songwriter Amy Farris on Sunday night at McCabe's in Santa Monica. The event, which Alvin hosted, featured some of the most revered members of the L.A. roots music scene including veteran singer-songwriters Peter Case, Stan Ridgway, Rick Shea and the trio I See Hawks in L.A. The musicians played on a stage outfitted with a piano bench adorned with candles, flowers and photos of the Texas-born Farris, who died on Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Ridgway has always been a conscious individualist. Whether as a solo artist, as leader of '80s New Wave hit makers Wall of Voodoo, or as the mad genius behind the industrial mayhem of his current group, Drywall, Ridgway's vision has always been keenly his own, acutely focused in his own skewed fashion. Now Ridgway, who performs Friday at the Coach House, has taken his autonomous ambitions to a new level.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The streets of Los Angeles are littered with people whose dreams have been shattered by bad luck or timing. Stan Ridgway, who was born and still lives in the City of Angels, hasn't faced that kind of disappointment because he's been living his dream for the past 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Stan Ridgway is that rare pop songwriter whose knack for character, detail, inner dialogue and atmospheric soundscaping lets him create the kind of fictional world usually reserved for short-story writers. Eavesdropping on Ridgway's shady, nighttime world can be a lot of fun. But living in it is no picnic. At almost every turn, the characters on Ridgway's new album, "Mosquitos," find themselves being balked, double-crossed, coerced, frustrated or isolated. Two of them end up just plain dead--one murdered by his scheming vamp of a wife, and the other (the real mosquito of the piece)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
It was fitting that Stan Ridgway opened and closed his show at the Coach House with songs about beleaguered miners. After all, the characters who inhabit Ridgway's dimly lit musical world always seem to be getting the shaft. He began Friday night with "Overlords," a futuristic sci-fi story that cast the Los Angeles rocker/role-player as a pressed laborer dreaming of escape and resistance against sinister galactic powers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Work the Dumb Oracle" is the new album by Drywall, a band led by Stan Ridgway, the former Wall of Voodoo singer-guitarist whose career has been long and distinguished, if less than overwhelmingly rewarding commercially. At once futuristic and bluesy, "Oracle" is a collection of industrial, ensemble musical improvisation over finely honed lyrics, sung in Ridgway's amusingly tweaked signature vocal style.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The streets of Los Angeles are littered with people whose dreams have been shattered by bad luck or timing. Stan Ridgway, who was born and still lives in the City of Angels, hasn't faced that kind of disappointment because he's been living his dream for the past 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1995
I have served as Stan Ridgway's personal manager for over seven years and, contrary to last Sunday's Pop Eye, Mr. Ridgway was never "thrilled" to be selected as part of Zima's "Bold New Taste--Bold New Band" ad campaign. In fact, he had no wish to be associated in any way with this product. Period. Mr. Ridgway has always believed that his personal integrity as an artist is his most precious commodity, and over his 15-year career he has turned down numerous offers for various corporate offers and/or sponsorships.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
** 1/2 Stan Ridgway, "Anatomy," New West. The veteran L.A. noir auteur makes records that are like Santa Ana winds--warm and seductive, prickly and ominous. He has a voice that could dig a shallow grave, which is exactly what one of the characters does in this chronicle of misdeeds and sad lives, all set to a cinematic brand of industrial-cum-cabaret rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
** 1/2 Stan Ridgway, "Anatomy," New West. The veteran L.A. noir auteur makes records that are like Santa Ana winds--warm and seductive, prickly and ominous. He has a voice that could dig a shallow grave, which is exactly what one of the characters does in this chronicle of misdeeds and sad lives, all set to a cinematic brand of industrial-cum-cabaret rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Ridgway has always been a conscious individualist. Whether as a solo artist, as leader of '80s New Wave hit makers Wall of Voodoo, or as the mad genius behind the industrial mayhem of his current group, Drywall, Ridgway's vision has always been keenly his own, acutely focused in his own skewed fashion. Now Ridgway, who performs Friday at the Coach House, has taken his autonomous ambitions to a new level.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1996 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"You're just a little too smart for a big dumb town," croons Stan Ridgway in his wry, nasal tone on the opening cut of his latest album, "Black Diamond." Ridgway, a solo kind of guy since leaving Wall of Voodoo in 1983, may as well be singing about himself. For the last four albums, he has amassed a vast repertoire of songs about lovers, loners, losers, lunatics and Los Angelenos in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1995
I have served as Stan Ridgway's personal manager for over seven years and, contrary to last Sunday's Pop Eye, Mr. Ridgway was never "thrilled" to be selected as part of Zima's "Bold New Taste--Bold New Band" ad campaign. In fact, he had no wish to be associated in any way with this product. Period. Mr. Ridgway has always believed that his personal integrity as an artist is his most precious commodity, and over his 15-year career he has turned down numerous offers for various corporate offers and/or sponsorships.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Work the Dumb Oracle" is the new album by Drywall, a band led by Stan Ridgway, the former Wall of Voodoo singer-guitarist whose career has been long and distinguished, if less than overwhelmingly rewarding commercially. At once futuristic and bluesy, "Oracle" is a collection of industrial, ensemble musical improvisation over finely honed lyrics, sung in Ridgway's amusingly tweaked signature vocal style.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1985 | RICHARD CROMELIN
"SEVEN DAYS IN SAMMYSTOWN." Wall of Voodoo. I.R.S. Stan Ridgway is gone, taking with him the smirk and the sneer that defined the Wall's smart-ass, nightmare-in-the-fun-house stance. New singer Andy Prieboy is called on to imitate his predecessor's arch manner only a couple of times, but when he plays it straight he isn't distinctive enough to provide a strong focus for the band.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Stan Ridgway isn't one for obvious career moves, having abandoned the successful band Wall of Voodoo a decade ago for an uncertain solo career featuring wiseguy tales of urban despair that haven't exactly followed the usual Top 40 formulas. So if his new Drywall trio fails to cross over into the pop mainstream, maybe it's just because his songs are so strange, amusing and, well, interesting. On the new "Work the Dumb Oracle" album, the music has an industrial rigidness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was fitting that Stan Ridgway opened and closed his show Friday night at the Coach House with songs about beleaguered miners. After all, the characters who inhabit his dimly lit musical world always seem to be getting the shaft. Ridgway began with "Overlords," a science fiction story that could have been taken from Isaac Asimov or Harlan Ellison.
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