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Stan Ross

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BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An "exhausted" Stan Ross headed home to Los Angeles on Wednesday following six grueling weeks as lead negotiator for Donald J. Trump, the flashy East Coast developer who earlier this week avoided financial disaster with a last-minute loan package. "I've seen complex deals before, but I've never seen one as complex as this one because of the time pressures, global scope and personalities involved," Ross said in a telephone interview from New York.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
The gig: After a long career as one of the country's most influential real estate accountants, Stan Ross is teaching and mentoring college students as chairman of the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate. Humble beginnings : Ross was born in 1936 in the Bronx, where he grew up and enjoyed playing basketball on public courts. In high school he found part-time work in a belt factory, and the monotonous labor of cutting belts motivated him to further his education at the City College of New York business school.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Kenneth Leventhal, a Los Angeles accountant who oversaw some of the largest real estate transactions in the country, died Tuesday at his Bel-Air home. He was 90 and had prostate cancer. Leventhal was a key figure in the transformation of Southern California after World War II as the region grew into a densely populated metropolis. His firm, Kenneth Leventhal & Co., guided such prominent real estate developers as Ray Watt, Trammell Crow and Donald Trump through times of expansion and financial distress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Kenneth Leventhal, a Los Angeles accountant who oversaw some of the largest real estate transactions in the country, died Tuesday at his Bel-Air home. He was 90 and had prostate cancer. Leventhal was a key figure in the transformation of Southern California after World War II as the region grew into a densely populated metropolis. His firm, Kenneth Leventhal & Co., guided such prominent real estate developers as Ray Watt, Trammell Crow and Donald Trump through times of expansion and financial distress.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1985 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Kenneth Leventhal was a 10-year-old hawking newspapers in the Depression, he met a man who unwittingly set him on the path to building one of the nation's most influential and profitable accounting firms. The man, a newspaper distributor who was taking a correspondence course in accounting, "reached in his pocket and pulled out a pencil and said 'this is all you need to be in the business,"' recalls Leventhal. "I figured I could always raise a nickel for a pencil."
REAL ESTATE
March 2, 1986
Pension funds "have such an overwhelming presence in the stock market that it is increasingly difficult to outperform the market average. They are the market," according to Stan Ross, co-managing partner of Kenneth Leventhal & Co. "As a result," the executive of the national CPA and consulting firm specializing in real estate and related financial services continued, "they are looking to diversify into new investments that may provide greater yields."
BUSINESS
April 25, 1995 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the gray world of accounting, Stan Ross is a whirlwind in an untucked shirt. The indefatigable financial trouble-shooter has been known to wear down intransigent creditors in marathon negotiations, bailing out real estate moguls from Peter Kalikow to Donald Trump. In doing so, the 59-year-old managing partner of Kenneth Leventhal & Co. wins their friendship and enthusiastic praise and, not incidentally, earns him fees of more than $400 an hour for months of work.
REAL ESTATE
December 2, 2007 | Sam Byker, Special to The Times
With home sales plummeting nationwide, many new home developers have been frantically slashing prices and adding incentives to draw buyers. But not all home builders are joining the race to the pricing bottom. Last month, Miami-based Lennar Corp. applied the brakes. The company announced that it will build just 259 of the 1,100 homes planned for its Central Park West development in Irvine, and will not sell any until the market improves, an industry practice known as "mothballing."
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Ross has long been one of the best-known and most respected authorities on Southern California real estate. As vice chairman and managing partner of E&Y Kenneth Leventhal, the real estate arm of Ernst & Young, Los Angeles-based Ross is an accountant who has developed a reputation as a top-level consultant.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
The gig: After a long career as one of the country's most influential real estate accountants, Stan Ross is teaching and mentoring college students as chairman of the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate. Humble beginnings : Ross was born in 1936 in the Bronx, where he grew up and enjoyed playing basketball on public courts. In high school he found part-time work in a belt factory, and the monotonous labor of cutting belts motivated him to further his education at the City College of New York business school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Producer-engineer Stan Ross, who co-founded Hollywood's Gold Star Recording Studio, which has a storied place in rock history as the home of Phil Spector's innovative "Wall of Sound" technique, has died. He was 82. Ross died Friday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank of complications following surgery for aneurysms, his family said. "Stan was born with a musical ear," said David Gold, an engineer who co-founded Gold Star with Ross in 1950 when both were barely out of their teens.
REAL ESTATE
December 2, 2007 | Sam Byker, Special to The Times
With home sales plummeting nationwide, many new home developers have been frantically slashing prices and adding incentives to draw buyers. But not all home builders are joining the race to the pricing bottom. Last month, Miami-based Lennar Corp. applied the brakes. The company announced that it will build just 259 of the 1,100 homes planned for its Central Park West development in Irvine, and will not sell any until the market improves, an industry practice known as "mothballing."
BUSINESS
June 1, 1999 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USC has selected real estate industry veteran Stan Ross to serve as chairman of the Lusk Center for Real Estate as part of a reorganization of the school's real estate education and research programs. Ross--who will be retiring as vice chairman and managing partner of E&Y Kenneth Leventhal Real Estate Group--said he plans to expand Lusk's focus beyond real estate development.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stan Ross has long been one of the best-known and most respected authorities on Southern California real estate. As vice chairman and managing partner of E&Y Kenneth Leventhal, the real estate arm of Ernst & Young, Los Angeles-based Ross is an accountant who has developed a reputation as a top-level consultant.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1995 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the gray world of accounting, Stan Ross is a whirlwind in an untucked shirt. The indefatigable financial trouble-shooter has been known to wear down intransigent creditors in marathon negotiations, bailing out real estate moguls from Peter Kalikow to Donald Trump. In doing so, the 59-year-old managing partner of Kenneth Leventhal & Co. wins their friendship and enthusiastic praise and, not incidentally, earns him fees of more than $400 an hour for months of work.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An "exhausted" Stan Ross headed home to Los Angeles on Wednesday following six grueling weeks as lead negotiator for Donald J. Trump, the flashy East Coast developer who earlier this week avoided financial disaster with a last-minute loan package. "I've seen complex deals before, but I've never seen one as complex as this one because of the time pressures, global scope and personalities involved," Ross said in a telephone interview from New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Producer-engineer Stan Ross, who co-founded Hollywood's Gold Star Recording Studio, which has a storied place in rock history as the home of Phil Spector's innovative "Wall of Sound" technique, has died. He was 82. Ross died Friday at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank of complications following surgery for aneurysms, his family said. "Stan was born with a musical ear," said David Gold, an engineer who co-founded Gold Star with Ross in 1950 when both were barely out of their teens.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1999 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USC has selected real estate industry veteran Stan Ross to serve as chairman of the Lusk Center for Real Estate as part of a reorganization of the school's real estate education and research programs. Ross--who will be retiring as vice chairman and managing partner of E&Y Kenneth Leventhal Real Estate Group--said he plans to expand Lusk's focus beyond real estate development.
REAL ESTATE
March 2, 1986
Pension funds "have such an overwhelming presence in the stock market that it is increasingly difficult to outperform the market average. They are the market," according to Stan Ross, co-managing partner of Kenneth Leventhal & Co. "As a result," the executive of the national CPA and consulting firm specializing in real estate and related financial services continued, "they are looking to diversify into new investments that may provide greater yields."
BUSINESS
August 18, 1985 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Kenneth Leventhal was a 10-year-old hawking newspapers in the Depression, he met a man who unwittingly set him on the path to building one of the nation's most influential and profitable accounting firms. The man, a newspaper distributor who was taking a correspondence course in accounting, "reached in his pocket and pulled out a pencil and said 'this is all you need to be in the business,"' recalls Leventhal. "I figured I could always raise a nickel for a pencil."
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