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Stan Sanders

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though he won a third term Tuesday, City Councilman Nate Holden said that being forced into a runoff with Stan Sanders was a sign that he needs to improve his relationship with residents of the 10th District. Holden said that during his door-to-door campaign visits, many residents told him they voted against him in the April primary and would vote against him again in the runoff because he didn't attend their block club meetings.
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OPINION
June 18, 1995
It is traditional to congratulate the winner, and Stan Sanders did just that in his election loss to Councilman Nate Holden. But Holden's post-election comments ("Holden Vows Retaliation After Tough Race," June 8) showed the kind of sore-winner attitude that turns off voters and helps produce the kind of abysmally low turnout seen in that race. There is much to admire in Holden's career from state senator to City Council member, but certainly not his threats to punish colleagues who may have opposed him--instead of wondering why they did. ROBERT KNOWLES Los Angeles
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NEWS
March 26, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tone of the 10th District City Council race was set earlier this month on the fourth anniversary of the police beating of Rodney G. King: In a demonstration in front of incumbent Nate Holden's City Hall office, candidate Stan Sanders claimed that the councilman was too sympathetic toward former Police Chief Daryl F. Gates, who initially lamented the action of the officers but later was critical of King.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though he won a third term Tuesday, City Councilman Nate Holden said that being forced into a runoff with Stan Sanders was a sign that he needs to improve his relationship with residents of the 10th District. Holden said that during his door-to-door campaign visits, many residents told him they voted against him in the April primary and would vote against him again in the runoff because he didn't attend their block club meetings.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their first radio appearance together, the three candidates for the 10th District City Council seat abruptly shifted talk to another race. Incumbent Nate Holden said he once ran the Los Angeles marathon to raise money for youth sports. "You never completed the marathon," challenger Stan Sanders said with a snicker, prompting Holden to angrily fire back. "I've got medals. You can call the marathon office," Holden shouted, then read the phone number over the air (Holden completed the race in 1990 and 1991; Sanders admitted later that he didn't know whether Holden had finished.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cosby Shows: The campaign for Stan Sanders, one of 28 Los Angeles mayoral candidates, will receive a big boost this weekend from Bill Cosby, who will be on hand when Sanders officially opens his campaign headquarters Saturday at 2:30 p.m. The office is in a South-Central L.A. cultural landmark--Marla Gibbs' Crossroads Theater, at the corner of Degnan and 43rd Street. Sanders, a Rhodes scholar who was born in Watts, has been friends with Cosby for almost three decades.
OPINION
June 18, 1995
It is traditional to congratulate the winner, and Stan Sanders did just that in his election loss to Councilman Nate Holden. But Holden's post-election comments ("Holden Vows Retaliation After Tough Race," June 8) showed the kind of sore-winner attitude that turns off voters and helps produce the kind of abysmally low turnout seen in that race. There is much to admire in Holden's career from state senator to City Council member, but certainly not his threats to punish colleagues who may have opposed him--instead of wondering why they did. ROBERT KNOWLES Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995
The Times published an article (March 8) concerning my fund-raising for the council race in 10th District and my opponent, Stan Sanders. The headlines and the primary information in the article are incorrect. (I'm even referred to as "67 years old" when I'm actually 65. It may not seem like much, but those extra two years are important to me.) The article reports amounts that are described as totals when they are actually subtotals. The sums quoted deal only with the first two months of 1995 and do not take into account total sums raised for this campaign.
OPINION
January 31, 1993
Must we vote for what we are? Does Los Angeles have to elect a mayor by race, religion or ethnic background? Does everyone have to get in line by district and color? Do blacks have to vote for Nate Holden or Stan Sanders? Do Jews vote for Richard Katz or Joel Wachs? Latinos split the vote on Julian Nava or Linda Griego? Lucky Michael Woo has all the Asians to himself. The same goes for Nick Patsaouras with the Greeks, and Richard Riordan has all the Irish Catholics. Of course this leaves many an Italian, German, Dutch, Armenian or Filipino without anyone to vote for. Can we get more candidates or will some of us have to compromise and vote for an American without a hyphen, without regard for sex, color or national origin?
OPINION
March 28, 1993
The Times says it is for healing L.A. It has introduced vox populi sections in which, supposedly, the community is heard. Yet it stops far short of allowing new leaders to emerge. The painful reportorial twisting in your article on the forum seemed calculated to see that a relatively unknown mayoral candidate, Ted Hayes, did not appear to have won anything significant when he received far more votes from these campus politicians than did the other "real" candidates. (A picture accompanying the story showed Nick Patsaouras, who got zero student votes, and Stan Sanders, who got one-fourth the number of votes that Hayes got. Hayes was not shown.
NEWS
June 7, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Barbara Yaroslavsky, an early favorite to win her husband's former City Council seat, was overwhelmingly defeated Tuesday by political neophyte Michael Feuer in a bitter 5th District race that drew few voters. Feuer's 2-to-1 lead over Yaroslavsky for the seat left vacant when Zev Yaroslavsky was elected to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors effectively scuttled hopes of establishing a Yaroslavsky dynasty in local government. Yaroslavsky conceded at 10:30 p.m.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG and HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After waging highly visible and negative campaigns leading up to the April primary, Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden and his 10th District rival, attorney Stan Sanders, have only recently renewed active politicking after a month of relative silence. Meanwhile, in another runoff battle, 5th District candidate Barbara Yaroslavsky has won the endorsement of a former rival in her June 6 showdown with Mike Feuer.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA and HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After years of saying no, Los Angeles voters were finally saying yes to a measure that makes it easier for the mayor to fire top bureaucrats, according to nearly complete returns in Tuesday's municipal elections, which also produced runoffs in two hotly contested City Council races. Veteran 10th District Councilman Nate Holden was falling short of the 50%-plus-one margin required to avoid a June 6 runoff contest with his main challenger, attorney J. Stanley Sanders.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their first radio appearance together, the three candidates for the 10th District City Council seat abruptly shifted talk to another race. Incumbent Nate Holden said he once ran the Los Angeles marathon to raise money for youth sports. "You never completed the marathon," challenger Stan Sanders said with a snicker, prompting Holden to angrily fire back. "I've got medals. You can call the marathon office," Holden shouted, then read the phone number over the air (Holden completed the race in 1990 and 1991; Sanders admitted later that he didn't know whether Holden had finished.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tone of the 10th District City Council race was set earlier this month on the fourth anniversary of the police beating of Rodney G. King: In a demonstration in front of incumbent Nate Holden's City Hall office, candidate Stan Sanders claimed that the councilman was too sympathetic toward former Police Chief Daryl F. Gates, who initially lamented the action of the officers but later was critical of King.
OPINION
March 19, 1995
As long as City Councilman Nate Holden refuses to debate the issues and ducks every community forum we've been invited to attend together, he can expect to find me outside his City Hall door or anywhere else he tries to hide ("Holden's Campaign," letter, March 14). After eight years of embarrassing the 10th District, Councilman Holden has a lot to answer for and he understandably doesn't want to do so in the public. He doesn't want to explain being an apologist for former Police Chief Daryl Gates nor his vote to reinstate Gates after the Police Commission suspended the chief following the Rodney King beating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1993
Los Angeles mayoral hopefuls Richard Katz, Stan Sanders and Linda Griego released new commercials in their efforts to catch front-runners Michael Woo and Richard Riordan. THE SANDERS AD: The 30-second spot features footage of U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy urging peace in 1968 and scenes from last year's riots. It ends with "Keep the Peace" flashed on the screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It defies the political laws of gravity at City Hall when a challenger does a better job of raising money than the incumbent he is trying to oust. But it's an anomaly that has reared its head in the contest between incumbent Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden, the feisty, often maverick lawmaker from the 10th District, and his main rival, attorney Stan Sanders, a former Rhodes scholar. Sanders' campaign finance report, belatedly filed Tuesday, shows that the challenger raised $81,656.
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