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Stan Shih

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BUSINESS
August 5, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Acer Inc., the world's third-largest maker of personal computers, will expand into televisions and electronic books within five years as the PC industry slows, founder Stan Shih said. "The PC actually is a mature industry," Shih, 64, said in an interview in his Taipei office. "PC extending to TV, of course, there's room." The Taiwanese company will pit itself against Samsung Electronics Co. and Kindle-maker Amazon.com Inc., which lead the markets for TVs and digital readers.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2001
Although China garners more attention in foreign-trade circles with its market potential and its efforts to join the World Trade Organization, Taiwan so far has proved to be a more valuable trading partner for California exporters. Last year, Taiwan ranked as the state's fifth-leading purchaser of California-made goods and products, accounting for more than $8 billion in sales and outspending China (No. 11) by more than 2 to 1.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1998
Affinity Media President Alice Muntz has learned how to play hardball in the male-dominated engineering field. She has worked in companies where the only other women were secretaries and with bosses who said she didn't need equal pay because she wasn't the family breadwinner. But Muntz persevered. Her 22-year career has taken her from programming terminals to corporate boardrooms, from Taiwan to the United States.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES SENIOR ECONOMICS EDITOR
A major obstacle to understanding the Asian crisis as a watershed in world industry and the lives of people is that it's always explained in terms of currency devaluations and bank loans gone bad. That is why news from Asia roils the stock markets every other day but seems to lack larger meaning. Yet what is happening in Asia represents a shift of technology and a passage from one industrial era to another. Many of the developments occurred earlier in U.S.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Taiwan is the most dynamic and prosperous yet relatively unknown economy in the world. It is a surprising economy. Taiwanese businesses have at least $37 billion and perhaps as much as $70 billion invested in the troubled countries of Southeast Asia, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines and Indonesia. But Taiwan isn't waiting for the International Monetary Fund to help those countries.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1992 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After years of tending their own garden, Taiwan business executives have entered the world's financial markets loaded with cash. Faced with higher labor costs and a rapidly appreciating Taiwanese dollar, hundreds of Taiwanese companies are investing billions overseas--from sweatshop textile firms in China's Fujian province to high-tech computer operations in Palo Alto, Calif. A government-backed consortium in November announced a plan to buy a $2-billion chunk of McDonnell Douglas Corp.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to give some perspective to Southeast Asia's economic crisis, Andrew Grove kicked off a technology summit here last week by harking back to the region's past. The Intel Corp. chief executive showed a picture of himself taken 27 years earlier, his pants rolled up to his knees, wading through mud that kept his car from reaching the site of a new plant being built in Malaysia. "Just to finish the story," Grove said, "it's a place where we employ over 8,000 people today."
BUSINESS
February 10, 1992 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After years of tending their own garden, Taiwan business executives have entered the world's financial markets loaded with cash. Faced with higher labor costs and a rapidly appreciating Taiwanese dollar, hundreds of Taiwanese companies are investing billions overseas--from sweatshop textile firms in China's Fujian province to high-tech computer operations in Palo Alto, Calif. A government-backed consortium in November announced a plan to buy a $2-billion chunk of McDonnell Douglas Corp.
WORLD
July 14, 2002 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recent statements from Taiwan and mainland China have heightened speculation that the two longtime adversaries might at last be preparing for talks to open direct trade, transportation and telecommunications links across the Taiwan Strait. Hints of possible change first came in May, when Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian indicated a willingness to let nongovernmental groups play a role in negotiating the direct links.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Taiwan is faring best of all the Asian countries in the current crisis. There is no International Monetary Fund emergency loan program needed for Taiwan's banks. Indeed, Taiwan's government, with $83 billion in foreign currency reserves, could lend the IMF a buck or two. The Taiwan dollar has fallen roughly 19% against the U.S. dollar, the lowest devaluation among convertible Asian currencies. Taiwan's industry is confident.
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