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Stan Statham

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
Duties include the largely ceremonial task of presiding over the state Senate, replacing the governor in the chief executive's absence, chairing an economic development commission, and service on a variety of boards and commissions, including the UC Board of Regents and the State Lands Commission. Salary: $90,000 a year. MAJOR CANDIDATES There is a tight race between the two Republican nominees, state Sen. Cathie Wright of Simi Valley and Assemblyman Stan Statham of Oak Run.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
Duties include the largely ceremonial task of presiding over the state Senate, replacing the governor in the chief executive's absence, chairing an economic development commission, and service on a variety of boards and commissions, including the UC Board of Regents and the State Lands Commission. Salary: $90,000 a year. MAJOR CANDIDATES There is a tight race between the two Republican nominees, state Sen. Cathie Wright of Simi Valley and Assemblyman Stan Statham of Oak Run.
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NEWS
September 1, 1993 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The Northern California lawmaker who wants to divide California into three parts announced Tuesday he would promote his cause by running for lieutenant governor of the one California that has existed since 1850. Assemblyman Stan Statham (R-Oak Run) declared his candidacy in a message videotaped in front of the state Capitol in Sacramento, saying, "A vote for Stan Statham as lieutenant governor will be a vote for three new Californias."
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having scaled daunting obstacles, the drive to break California into three states has progressed further in the Legislature than at any time since separatists got their way in the Gold Rush era. And, if latter-day separatist Assemblyman Stan Statham prevails, Californians next year will vote on his plan to divide the state into three smaller and, theoretically, more manageable pieces.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having scaled daunting obstacles, the drive to break California into three states has progressed further in the Legislature than at any time since separatists got their way in the Gold Rush era. And, if latter-day separatist Assemblyman Stan Statham prevails, Californians next year will vote on his plan to divide the state into three smaller and, theoretically, more manageable pieces.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
A Republican assemblyman said Thursday he will resign his committee chairmanship at the end of the 1988 legislative session, saying he had taken too much heat for siding with most Assembly Democrats to block a no-fault automobile insurance bill. Assemblyman Stan Statham (R-Oak Run) said he will step down as chairman of the Committee on Governmental Efficiency and Consumer Protection on Aug.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Although Assembly Speaker Willie Brown appeared certain to retain his powerful post after helping Democrats to capture three Republican seats in the Nov. 8 election, there were strong indications Tuesday that the turmoil is far from over and that Brown may hold on to the speakership by only a slim margin.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Would two Californias work better than one? Or should we all stick together as one big semi-happy family? On Tuesday, voters in 31 counties will get the chance to weigh in on this meaty matter, deciding on an advisory plebiscite that asks whether the Golden State should be chopped into two parts. Echoing gripes that first rumbled through California in the mid-1800s, the separatists say the state has grown unmanageably large and is saddled with a government that is unresponsive to the people.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | JERRY GILLAM and CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writers
The Assembly on Monday passed a bill to require convicted prostitutes to be tested for the AIDS virus after a coalition of Republicans and dissident Democrats came within one vote of embarrassing Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) by withdrawing a similar measure from a committee.
NEWS
March 22, 1988
A bill designating the banana slug the official state mollusk was narrowly passed by the Assembly. A 42-30 vote sent the measure to an uncertain fate in the Senate. The legislation is sponsored by Assemblyman Byron D. Sher (D-Palo Alto), who introduced it at the recommendation of a troop of Campfire Girls in his district. Sher told his colleagues that banana slugs eat dead leaves, turning them into nutrients that nourish the state tree, the California redwood.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The Northern California lawmaker who wants to divide California into three parts announced Tuesday he would promote his cause by running for lieutenant governor of the one California that has existed since 1850. Assemblyman Stan Statham (R-Oak Run) declared his candidacy in a message videotaped in front of the state Capitol in Sacramento, saying, "A vote for Stan Statham as lieutenant governor will be a vote for three new Californias."
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Would two Californias work better than one? Or should we all stick together as one big semi-happy family? On Tuesday, voters in 31 counties will get the chance to weigh in on this meaty matter, deciding on an advisory plebiscite that asks whether the Golden State should be chopped into two parts. Echoing gripes that first rumbled through California in the mid-1800s, the separatists say the state has grown unmanageably large and is saddled with a government that is unresponsive to the people.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Although Assembly Speaker Willie Brown appeared certain to retain his powerful post after helping Democrats to capture three Republican seats in the Nov. 8 election, there were strong indications Tuesday that the turmoil is far from over and that Brown may hold on to the speakership by only a slim margin.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
A Republican assemblyman said Thursday he will resign his committee chairmanship at the end of the 1988 legislative session, saying he had taken too much heat for siding with most Assembly Democrats to block a no-fault automobile insurance bill. Assemblyman Stan Statham (R-Oak Run) said he will step down as chairman of the Committee on Governmental Efficiency and Consumer Protection on Aug.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | JERRY GILLAM and CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writers
The Assembly on Monday passed a bill to require convicted prostitutes to be tested for the AIDS virus after a coalition of Republicans and dissident Democrats came within one vote of embarrassing Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) by withdrawing a similar measure from a committee.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | United Press International
Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), seeking to blunt criticism of the Legislature after an FBI corruption investigation, announced Friday the appointments of an Ethics Committee. The committee consists of five Democrats and three Republicans. It will be headed by Assemblyman John Vasconcellos (D-Santa Clara), who also is chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. Besides Vasconcellos, the Democrats on the committee are Elihu M.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Assembly beamed its session live across the state as part of a test to determine if the Legislature wants to follow the lead of Congress and televise its proceedings. The Assembly will be carried from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. through Aug. 31 on 27 cable channels with a potential for more than 2 million viewers. After the test is completed, the membership will decide whether to go ahead with a full-scale television program patterned after C-SPAN, which televises Congress.
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