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BUSINESS
June 30, 1999
With the Standard & Poor's Small-Cap 600 index at its highest level since last July, a lot of investors are looking closely at lesser-known companies. Time will tell whether this is a quarterly aberration or whether smaller stocks, which have lagged blue chips in recent years, are in for an extended run.
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BUSINESS
June 30, 1999
With the Standard & Poor's Small-Cap 600 index at its highest level since last July, a lot of investors are looking closely at lesser-known companies. Time will tell whether this is a quarterly aberration or whether smaller stocks, which have lagged blue chips in recent years, are in for an extended run.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Standard and Poor's Corp., the credit rating agency, said Monday that its outlook for the U.S. life and health insurance industry is negative over the next two years and that more companies may be downgraded if they cannot boost their cash reserves quickly. The agency said that asset quality problems in some of the insurers' real estate and high-yield bond portfolios deepened beyond its expectations and that some companies' capital positions have weakened considerably.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1985 | JANE APPLEGATE
In response to a continuing slump in the worldwide engineering and construction industry, Standard and Poor's Corp. Wednesday downgraded Fluor Corp.'s debt rating from A to A minus for long-term debt and from A1 to A2 for commercial paper. In the first half of fiscal 1985, the Irvine engineering, construction and natural resources company, lost $72 million on revenues of $2.1 billion, although it booked nearly $3 billion in new orders during the period. George W.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1986 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
AFG Partners resumed its pursuit of Lear Siegler on Thursday with a $68.1-million purchase of about 4.7% of the Santa Monica-based aerospace and manufacturing concern's common stock. The investment group amassed the position just two days after Wickes Cos. said it was having difficulty obtaining the financing necessary to complete its previously announced offer to buy all of Lear Siegler for about $1.7 billion in cash.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to broaden its offerings in the skin care business, Johnson & Johnson said Monday that it will pay a premium price of $924.1 million to acquire Neutrogena, the maker of premium-priced soaps, shampoos and other beauty products. A deal had been widely expected after Los Angeles-based Neutrogena said earlier this month it was holding buyout talks with a "substantially larger" company. Johnson & Johnson will pay $35.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1985 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
The painting of a stormy landscape hanging behind Smith International Inc. Chairman Jerry Neely's desk suits the dark mood around the company's Newport Beach headquarters. So far this year, the provider of equipment and services for oil and gas drillers reported a 6-month loss of $50 million and laid off more than 800 workers, including 31 at the corporate headquarters.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending months slimming down its far-flung, diversified operations and pumping life into its ailing retail unit, Los Angeles conglomerate Pacific Enterprises ran into a major challenge close to home. A fiery natural gas explosion tore the roof from a Lakewood home in September, sending a mother and her two children to a hospital burn center in critical condition.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN
There's nothing quite like bad news to make Nancy Tengler and Geraldine Weiss take notice. A chemical plant explosion in India, an oil slick in Alaska, even a mass murder in a cafeteria in Texas. They deplore the loss of life, of course. But they also know the temporary effect that grim headlines can have on great stocks. When everyone else is selling shares in a panic, their dividend-based disciplines keep them cool and steady, laying traps for plunging stocks and snaring them as bargains.
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