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SCIENCE
July 7, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Physicists might have to rethink what they know about, well, everything. European researchers dropped a potential bombshell on their colleagues around the world Wednesday by reporting that sophisticated new measurements indicate the radius of the proton is 4% smaller than previously believed. In a world where measurements out to a dozen or more decimal places are routine, a 4% difference in this subatomic particle — found in every atom's nucleus — is phenomenally large, and the finding has left theoreticians scratching their heads in wonderment and confusion.
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SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Nearly 50 years after they proposed identical theories on how subatomic particles acquire mass, two European physicists were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for their conceptual research into the enigmatic Higgs particle. Francois Englert, 80, of Belgium, and Peter W. Higgs, 84, of Britain, were awarded the prize about 15 months after scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, confirmed the particle's existence amid great fanfare. "The awarded theory is a central part of the Standard Model of particle physics that describes how the world is constructed," read a statement from the Royal Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, announcing the prize.
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NEWS
February 9, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Physicists have found provocative evidence that a subatomic particle behaves in a way that cannot be explained by the prevailing model of how matter works on the smallest scale. If confirmed, the findings would carry science into new territory beyond the standard model of particle physics, which for 30 years has been the prevailing description of all the elementary particles in nature and the forces between them.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
They call it the "God particle. " It holds the key to humanity's presence on Earth - indeed, to the existence of all the matter in the universe. Feuding nations have set aside their differences and devoted billions of dollars to finding it. Scientists built massive supercolliders capable of producing temperatures nearly as frigid as the coldest spots in outer space in their quest to unravel its secrets. Even then, it took nearly half a century to get a glimpse of the thing. Now, in a crowning moment, two theoretical physicists have won the Nobel Prize in physics for having the gumption to envision that such a thing might have existed in the first place.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Nearly 50 years after they proposed identical theories on how subatomic particles acquire mass, two European physicists were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for their conceptual research into the enigmatic Higgs particle. Francois Englert, 80, of Belgium, and Peter W. Higgs, 84, of Britain, were awarded the prize about 15 months after scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, confirmed the particle's existence amid great fanfare. "The awarded theory is a central part of the Standard Model of particle physics that describes how the world is constructed," read a statement from the Royal Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, announcing the prize.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
For the first time, physicists have confirmed that certain subatomic particles have mass and that they could account for a large proportion of matter in the universe, the so-called dark matter that astrophysicists know is there but that cannot be observed by conventional means. The finding concerns the behavior of neutrinos, ghost-like particles that travel at the speed of light. In the new experiment, physicists captured a muon neutrino in the process of transforming into a tau neutrino.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
They call it the "God particle. " It holds the key to humanity's presence on Earth - indeed, to the existence of all the matter in the universe. Feuding nations have set aside their differences and devoted billions of dollars to finding it. Scientists built massive supercolliders capable of producing temperatures nearly as frigid as the coldest spots in outer space in their quest to unravel its secrets. Even then, it took nearly half a century to get a glimpse of the thing. Now, in a crowning moment, two theoretical physicists have won the Nobel Prize in physics for having the gumption to envision that such a thing might have existed in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dutch physicist Simon van der Meer, who shared the 1984 Nobel Prize in Physics with Italian physicist Carlo Rubbia for the discovery of the elementary particles known as W and Z that link two of the four fundamental forces of nature, died of undisclosed causes March 4 in Geneva. He was 85. The "standard model" of physics says that there are four fundamental forces in nature: gravity, electromagnetism, the strong force (which holds atoms and elementary particles like protons and neutrons together)
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | LIANNE HART and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history, a man crashed his pickup truck into a cafeteria crowded with lunchtime patrons here Wednesday afternoon and began firing rapidly and indiscriminately with a semiautomatic pistol, killing 22 people. The gunman later was found dead of a gunshot wound in a restaurant restroom, police said. The massacre resulted in injuries to 20 others, many of them listed in "very critical condition."
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | FRAZIER MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seriously, are sitcoms supposed to be funny? The issue came up on a recent Wednesday during lunch with a friend, as he recounted certain sitcoms he had happened upon the night before. One had a buzzed-cut, bespectacled nerd as a supporting player. Another had a fat boss. Both starred stand-up comics whose first name is John. But which show's hero was a sports columnist? Which show had the blond wife and the nice living room?
SCIENCE
August 1, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Scientists at a meeting in Grenoble, France, stoked speculation last week that physicists at the world's biggest particle accelerator may soon provide a first look at the elusive Higgs boson — the final piece of evidence needed to prove that the Standard Model of particle physics, which explains the behavior of subatomic particles, is correct. The $10-billion Large Hadron Collider was built near Geneva by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, to create exotic particles that physicists believe existed in the moments after the Big Bang.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dutch physicist Simon van der Meer, who shared the 1984 Nobel Prize in Physics with Italian physicist Carlo Rubbia for the discovery of the elementary particles known as W and Z that link two of the four fundamental forces of nature, died of undisclosed causes March 4 in Geneva. He was 85. The "standard model" of physics says that there are four fundamental forces in nature: gravity, electromagnetism, the strong force (which holds atoms and elementary particles like protons and neutrons together)
SCIENCE
July 7, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Physicists might have to rethink what they know about, well, everything. European researchers dropped a potential bombshell on their colleagues around the world Wednesday by reporting that sophisticated new measurements indicate the radius of the proton is 4% smaller than previously believed. In a world where measurements out to a dozen or more decimal places are routine, a 4% difference in this subatomic particle — found in every atom's nucleus — is phenomenally large, and the finding has left theoreticians scratching their heads in wonderment and confusion.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
For the first time, physicists have confirmed that certain subatomic particles have mass and that they could account for a large proportion of matter in the universe, the so-called dark matter that astrophysicists know is there but that cannot be observed by conventional means. The finding concerns the behavior of neutrinos, ghost-like particles that travel at the speed of light. In the new experiment, physicists captured a muon neutrino in the process of transforming into a tau neutrino.
AUTOS
January 23, 2008 | DAN NEIL
Chrysler's new vice-chairman and president, Jim Press, would do well to remember a maxim that comes to us from the hallowed days of vaudeville: Never follow an animal act. For a media event introducing its 2009 Dodge Ram pickup, Chrysler's PR department wrangled -- or was it rustled? -- a herd of Texas longhorns in front of Cobo Center, site of last week's 2008 North American International Auto Show, known universally as the Detroit Auto Show.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Physicists have found provocative evidence that a subatomic particle behaves in a way that cannot be explained by the prevailing model of how matter works on the smallest scale. If confirmed, the findings would carry science into new territory beyond the standard model of particle physics, which for 30 years has been the prevailing description of all the elementary particles in nature and the forces between them.
AUTOS
January 23, 2008 | DAN NEIL
Chrysler's new vice-chairman and president, Jim Press, would do well to remember a maxim that comes to us from the hallowed days of vaudeville: Never follow an animal act. For a media event introducing its 2009 Dodge Ram pickup, Chrysler's PR department wrangled -- or was it rustled? -- a herd of Texas longhorns in front of Cobo Center, site of last week's 2008 North American International Auto Show, known universally as the Detroit Auto Show.
REAL ESTATE
January 19, 1992 | GARY ABRAMS, Abrams is a Los Angeles contractor and free-lance writer
To reduce domestic water consumption and relieve pressure on overtaxed sewage treatment plants, almost 100 Southland cities and communities offer rebate programs for homeowners who replace water-guzzling toilets with water-saving models. The rebates vary, but range roughly from $75 to $100 for each toilet replaced. Some cities also offer low-cost installation of the new toilets. A water-saving, or "ultra-low-flush," toilet is designed to use only 1.6 gallons of water or less for each flush, compared to a standard toilet that uses up to six gallons a flush.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | FRAZIER MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seriously, are sitcoms supposed to be funny? The issue came up on a recent Wednesday during lunch with a friend, as he recounted certain sitcoms he had happened upon the night before. One had a buzzed-cut, bespectacled nerd as a supporting player. Another had a fat boss. Both starred stand-up comics whose first name is John. But which show's hero was a sports columnist? Which show had the blond wife and the nice living room?
REAL ESTATE
January 19, 1992 | GARY ABRAMS, Abrams is a Los Angeles contractor and free-lance writer
To reduce domestic water consumption and relieve pressure on overtaxed sewage treatment plants, almost 100 Southland cities and communities offer rebate programs for homeowners who replace water-guzzling toilets with water-saving models. The rebates vary, but range roughly from $75 to $100 for each toilet replaced. Some cities also offer low-cost installation of the new toilets. A water-saving, or "ultra-low-flush," toilet is designed to use only 1.6 gallons of water or less for each flush, compared to a standard toilet that uses up to six gallons a flush.
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