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NEWS
June 1, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racked by war, disease and corruption, sub-Saharan Africa today suffers from income levels that actually are lower than in the late 1960s, when the region was embarking on a hopeful new chapter of independence from colonial rule. The finding on average income levels, currently less than $1 a day per person in much of the region--was among an array of dire facts about Africa's economies in a report released Wednesday by the World Bank and other agencies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the California Horse Racing Board said Tuesday that the agency should not take a proactive role to investigate reports of poor labor and living conditions in the stables of the state's racetracks. At a board meeting at Hollywood Park, Robert Tourtelot, a prominent Los Angeles defense attorney and Pete Wilson appointee, said a recent Times story detailing problems in the so-called backstretches of California's 15 racing venues was "filled with inaccuracies."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of a state Assembly committee that oversees horse racing vowed Monday to fix poor labor and living conditions in the stables of California's racetracks. "No one wants people to live in squalor," said Assemblyman Herb Wesson (D-Culver City), reacting to a Times story that documented persistent and widespread problems there. "I don't see this being put on the back burner. We need to rectify this." A spokesman for State Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2000 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For as long as anyone can remember, college dreams tended to wither in the dusty heat of this small desert town near the Arizona border. Then, civic leaders hatched a bold experiment: They invited a private, liberal arts university program to come to town, putting bachelor's degrees within easy reach of locals. Now, after just two years of operation, Blythe's experiment is ending in failure. Park University-Blythe, the town's own little four-year university, will close for good in July.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter of a century ago, Ron Fauquher was a central-casting cog of the "old economy," cranking out headlights at a General Motors plant in the eastern Indiana Rust Belt. It was an industry headed for hard times. Then Fauquher and a GM buddy started a software business and hit pay dirt. A bigger company bought them out, installing Fauquher in the executive suite, and now he and his wife eat out five times a week.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not so long ago, Countrywide Home Loans needed an army of customers service reps to field the 20,000 calls that streamed into its offices everyday. Each inquiry--ranging from payment problems to tax questions--cost the lender about $4. Today, almost half of those calls are handled by an automated system, which identifies the caller from the incoming phone number, scans the homeowner's account, then automatically supplies the information it thinks the customer is seeking.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | MARK ARAX MARY CURTIUS and SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At the doorstep of a new century, California finds itself standing in a new Gilded Age, the income gap between rich and poor wider than at almost any time in history and magnified by the sudden wealth and lavish living of a growing elite. California's super rich haven't been this flush or freewheeling--and the poor and middle classes haven't languished this far behind--since the last days of the Roaring '20s, economists say.
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
The number of people living in poverty varies widely across the nation, ranging from the single digits throughout most of the Northeast to more than 20% in some parts of the South, the Census Bureau reports today. Just 6.2% of the people in New Hampshire, and 7.5% of that state's children, were in families earning below the poverty line of $16,306 for a family of four in 1996. In Mississippi, the state with the highest poverty rate, 20.8% of people live below the poverty line. Nationally, 13.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | PETER G. GOSSELIN and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Americans of virtually all stripes--rich and poor, in the West and the East, Latino and white--enjoyed substantial income gains in 1998 as the nation's long expansion lifted ordinary households to new heights of prosperity, the Census Bureau said Thursday. The inflation-adjusted earnings of households at the center of the nation's economic pile rose $1,304, or 3.5%, to $38,885 last year, the bureau said in its most comprehensive annual look at the well-being of Americans.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Vice President Al Gore, who hasn't heard very much good news lately, got some Thursday as the Census Bureau released figures showing broad income gains for American families--and even more important a significant decline in the poverty rate, especially among children. Seizing on the numbers, Gore immediately launched a broadside against challenger Bill Bradley in a telephone interview with The Times.
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