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NEWS
February 18, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blessed with clean air and low crime, Queretaro is a kind of Mexican Santa Clarita, a magnet for middle-class flight from the big city. Located about 120 miles northwest of Mexico City, Queretaro displays its ambitions in its glass office buildings and industrial parks, its Burger King restaurants and new movie theaters, and its magnificently restored colonial downtown. Subdivisions feature neat rows of identical pink houses with square front lawns and faux Italian names.
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NEWS
October 19, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private sector--what George W. Bush calls the engine fueling the nation's new wealth--has been very good to running mate Dick Cheney. Cheney spent much of his adult life as a public servant, collecting a relatively modest government salary as presidential aide, congressman and Defense secretary from the early 1970s to the early 1990s. Back in his days as a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before the buses stopped, the working-class residents of Berendo Street, the house painters and maids and construction workers and valets, were already making accommodations to get by on their meager salaries. They are mostly Mexican and Central American immigrants who save money by shopping at discount stores. They hang wet laundry on fire escapes rather than pump coins into dryers, and they pack their own lunches for work in plastic grocery bags.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When 8-year-old Evelyn Salcedo needed a tonsillectomy, her mother took her to Michoacan for the operation. The reason? Ana Salcedo had been charged $400 earlier for tests at a hospital in the San Fernando Valley. Without insurance, government assistance or private means, Salcedo could only afford a doctor in Mexico. It was the same for Rosaura Haro. When she and her daughter needed medical tests, she went south.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The twin problems of housing and health care that plague the northeast San Fernando Valley have defied solution yet remain at the center of debate at all levels of society and government. On the national level, presidential contenders have put the two issues high on their lists of priorities. Democrat Al Gore has proposed expanding an existing tax credit program by $5.7 billion over 10 years to allow construction of 180,000 rental homes or homes for ownership. Republican George W.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Guadalupe Rangel dreams of one day living in a garage of her own. The small room her family now inhabits is accessible only through a dimly lighted, trash-strewn alley. Rangel pays $300 a month for one bedroom--beds pushed together in the corner, possessions stacked high along the walls. She and her two young children share a kitchen and a bathroom with a family of five that sleeps crammed into another small room. Rangel, 37, has no health insurance.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The middle-income California family lost ground economically during the 1990s while those families in other states progressed, according to a new study. The report, released by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco on Monday, also expands on earlier studies showing a growing gap between the state's wealthiest and poorest residents during the 1990s. "In the rest of the U.S., the interesting thing about the 1990s was that income inequality leveled off.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of children living in poverty in America has declined significantly since 1993, partly reversing a longer-term increase that began two decades ago, according to a Columbia University study to be released today. The percentage of children living in poverty fell 17% from 1993 through 1998, the study says, and the improvement was particularly pronounced in traditionally poor Southern states, such as Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas and South Carolina. Even with that decline, however, 18.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mack Trucks closed its plant, when a fight broke out in the unemployment line, when Billy Joel wrote a song about the slow death of industrial America and called it "Allentown," those were bad times. Today, no, these are definitely not bad times. And don't for a minute think folks here don't appreciate the difference. What many could use, though--what this town could use--is a few more good years, a few more changes out of Washington.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it came to civic inferiority complexes, Fresno took a back seat to no one. The municipal resume in years past has included soaring homicide rates, urban blight so extensive that graffiti spread all over town, triple-digit summers and motor oil-thick winter fog. That's not even counting the time the city was ranked least livable out of 277 nationwide. Or the nighttime soap opera a few years back that lampooned the place as the kingdom of the raisin.
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