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Standard Of Living

NEWS
August 27, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The twin problems of housing and health care that plague the northeast San Fernando Valley have defied solution yet remain at the center of debate at all levels of society and government. On the national level, presidential contenders have put the two issues high on their lists of priorities. Democrat Al Gore has proposed expanding an existing tax credit program by $5.7 billion over 10 years to allow construction of 180,000 rental homes or homes for ownership. Republican George W.
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NEWS
August 27, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Guadalupe Rangel dreams of one day living in a garage of her own. The small room her family now inhabits is accessible only through a dimly lighted, trash-strewn alley. Rangel pays $300 a month for one bedroom--beds pushed together in the corner, possessions stacked high along the walls. She and her two young children share a kitchen and a bathroom with a family of five that sleeps crammed into another small room. Rangel, 37, has no health insurance.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The middle-income California family lost ground economically during the 1990s while those families in other states progressed, according to a new study. The report, released by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco on Monday, also expands on earlier studies showing a growing gap between the state's wealthiest and poorest residents during the 1990s. "In the rest of the U.S., the interesting thing about the 1990s was that income inequality leveled off.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of children living in poverty in America has declined significantly since 1993, partly reversing a longer-term increase that began two decades ago, according to a Columbia University study to be released today. The percentage of children living in poverty fell 17% from 1993 through 1998, the study says, and the improvement was particularly pronounced in traditionally poor Southern states, such as Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas and South Carolina. Even with that decline, however, 18.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mack Trucks closed its plant, when a fight broke out in the unemployment line, when Billy Joel wrote a song about the slow death of industrial America and called it "Allentown," those were bad times. Today, no, these are definitely not bad times. And don't for a minute think folks here don't appreciate the difference. What many could use, though--what this town could use--is a few more good years, a few more changes out of Washington.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it came to civic inferiority complexes, Fresno took a back seat to no one. The municipal resume in years past has included soaring homicide rates, urban blight so extensive that graffiti spread all over town, triple-digit summers and motor oil-thick winter fog. That's not even counting the time the city was ranked least livable out of 277 nationwide. Or the nighttime soap opera a few years back that lampooned the place as the kingdom of the raisin.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | From Reuters
For the seventh consecutive year, Canada ranks overall as the best place in the world to live. But if you are a woman, you are better off in Scandinavia, according to the U.N. Human Development Report 2000, released Thursday. Norway is second in overall rankings, followed by the United States, Australia, Iceland, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands, Japan and Britain.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that the powerful emir of Bukhara, desperate to have a son, came to this desert village hundreds of years ago to visit a woman famous for her fertility. The emir, following the superstition of the day, sat under her dress for several minutes, according to the legend. Returning to his walled city, he was soon blessed with a son he named Shakh Murad. The village took the same name, and when the prince became emir, he exempted the village from taxes forever.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racked by war, disease and corruption, sub-Saharan Africa today suffers from income levels that actually are lower than in the late 1960s, when the region was embarking on a hopeful new chapter of independence from colonial rule. The finding on average income levels, currently less than $1 a day per person in much of the region--was among an array of dire facts about Africa's economies in a report released Wednesday by the World Bank and other agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the California Horse Racing Board said Tuesday that the agency should not take a proactive role to investigate reports of poor labor and living conditions in the stables of the state's racetracks. At a board meeting at Hollywood Park, Robert Tourtelot, a prominent Los Angeles defense attorney and Pete Wilson appointee, said a recent Times story detailing problems in the so-called backstretches of California's 15 racing venues was "filled with inaccuracies."
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