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BUSINESS
January 22, 1985
Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) reported that earnings in the final three months of 1984 nudged up 1.3% from a year earlier, while profit for the full year jumped 17% to a record $2.183 billion. Richard Morrow, chairman of the Chicago-based oil giant, attributed the improvement for all of 1984--which came despite a drop in revenue--to record earnings from Indiana Standard's chemicals business and increased worldwide production of crude oil and natural gas. Earnings in the fourth quarter were about 1.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Raymond Loewy, the renowned industrial designer who was instrumental in creating the Coca-Cola bottle and Studebaker automobiles, received a Google tribute Tuesday, the 120th anniversary of his birth. The French-born Loewy was one of the key industrial designers of the 20th century, working with numerous companies to create products and logos that would enter the public consciousness. Among his most recognizable designs were the Shell logo, the Lucky Strike cigarette package and the Greyhound bus. His firm even helped to create the name "Exxon" for Standard Oil. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times Perhaps his most fruitful collaboration was with Studebaker, with whom he worked from 1936 to 1963.
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NEWS
April 28, 1987 | Associated Press
British Petroleum Co. and Standard Oil Co. announced agreement today on a sweetened offer from BP of cash and securities for the 45% of Standard Oil that it does not already own. Under the new plan, British Petroleum will pay $71.50 in cash for each share of Standard Oil common stock, $1.50 more than the $70 it originally offered March 26. It also will issue warrants for BP stock on the basis of one for every five Standard Oil shares.
OPINION
May 10, 2013
Re "Accent on the saying power," Column One, May 7 Regarding the dispute over the proper way to pronounce neighborhood names in Los Angeles such as Los Feliz, in English there is a standard way to pronounce words from foreign languages. It is incorrect English to attempt to change the accent one is speaking in the middle of a sentence. Yet there is a deplorable tendency among some now to show off their language chops by referring to, say, Italy's former prime minister as "SEEL-vyoh Bairrr-la-SKOHNNN-ee.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1987
British Petroleum Co. PLC announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, BP North America Inc., has been renamed BP America Inc. and, as a result of a merger just completed, now holds 100% of Standard Oil Co. The merger brings to a conclusion BP's bid for the 45% minority interest in Standard it did not already own and creates the third-largest oil company in the world.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1986
The company, known to many as Sohio, reported that it plans to put an end to its corporate identity crisis and from now on will refer to itself only as The Standard Oil Co. A company spokesman said the change was prompted by a consultant's study that found that, while Standard Oil is ranked 24th on the latest Fortune 500 list, it is not well known beyond the boundaries of Ohio. The company gave no estimate of what it will cost to make the necessary changes in advertising and stationery.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
British Petroleum offered today to pay $7.4 billion for the 45% of Standard Oil of Ohio it does not already own, a move that suggests that the oil industry believes the collapse of world oil prices is over. The purchase, at $70 per share, would solidify BP's position as the third-largest oil producer in the world, after Royal Dutch-Shell and Exxon. Standard Oil is the 24th-largest industrial corporation in the United States, and ranks as the ninth-biggest oil company in terms of assets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
George M. Keller, who oversaw the formation of Chevron Corp. in what was then the largest corporate takeover, died Friday in Palo Alto. He was 84. The former chairman and chief executive, who lived in San Mateo, died of complications from orthopedic surgery, his daughter-in-law Emma Gilbey Keller told the New York Times. Keller's son Bill is executive editor of the newspaper. As chairman of Standard Oil Co. of California, Keller executed the company's $13.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
British Petroleum, apparently confident that OPEC has regained control of world oil prices, Thursday offered $7.4 billion for the 45% of Standard Oil Co. of Ohio it does not already own. Oil industry observers treated the bid as a clear signal that BP, the world's third-largest oil producer, expects prices to stabilize at roughly $18 a barrel or higher, a level at which its offer for Standard Oil appears to be financially prudent.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1987
Standard Oil earned $31 million in the fourth quarter of 1986 but lost $345 million for the year, mostly because of lower prices and $810 million in charges that reflected the reduced value of its assets. The 1986 fourth-quarter results included a charge of $30 million for losses on the early retirement of debt and a $65-million charge for settling a disputed windfall profit-tax valuation with the Internal Revenue Service.
OPINION
December 6, 2009 | By Joyce Appleby
Lloyd Blankfein, the chief executive of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., has finally acknowledged that his company "participated in things that were clearly wrong." Evidently he's referring to the collapse of the U.S. economy, which has wiped out savings, pushed thousands into bankruptcy and left the country with a double-digit unemployment rate. As an act of contrition, Goldman Sachs will give $100 million during each of the next five years to help small businesses. Because the company has set aside more than $10 billion in employee bonuses for this year alone, paltry would seem a flattering description for the offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
George M. Keller, who oversaw the formation of Chevron Corp. in what was then the largest corporate takeover, died Friday in Palo Alto. He was 84. The former chairman and chief executive, who lived in San Mateo, died of complications from orthopedic surgery, his daughter-in-law Emma Gilbey Keller told the New York Times. Keller's son Bill is executive editor of the newspaper. As chairman of Standard Oil Co. of California, Keller executed the company's $13.
NEWS
July 1, 2008
Standard Hotel: A list in Friday's California section, with an article about the possible sale of the Times building, named several former corporate buildings in Los Angeles that have been put to new uses and said the Standard Hotel building once housed Standard Oil. The building was home to Superior Oil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Barbara Sears "Bobo" Rockefeller, a coal miner's daughter and one-time actress whose "Cinderella wedding of the century" to millionaire Winthrop Rockefeller in 1948 soon gave way to bitter divorce proceedings, died Monday at her home in Little Rock, Ark. She was 91. A cause of death was not announced. Born Jievute Paulekiute, she first attracted notice as Miss Lithuania at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. She later was Eva Paul on stage and Barbara Sears on screen. But her international fame -- a Time cover picture, a portrait by Salvador Dali -- was owed to her marriage to Rockefeller, heir to the Standard Oil fortune, a night clubbing bon vivant and one of America's wealthiest bachelors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Andrew Fisher Ensor, a onetime State Department official who was an authority on Middle Eastern oil policy and negotiated worldwide petroleum prices, died March 4 of heart disease at his home in Washington, D.C., the Washington Post reported. He was 90. From 1963 to 1966, Ensor worked for the State Department, where he served as director of an office of fuel and energy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. According to the Post, he managed State Department policies on coal, peat and other energy sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John E. Swearingen, 89, a Chicago banker and oil executive who led Standard Oil Co. of Indiana to become the sixth-largest U.S. company, died Friday of pneumonia at a Birmingham, Ala., hospital, according to his wife, Bonnie Bolding Swearingen. He also had Alzheimer's disease. A native of Columbia, S.C., Swearingen graduated from the University of South Carolina and earned a master's degree in chemical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1986
The company moved to rid itself of a $90-million investment in solar energy, selling its share of a partnership for $12 million worth of Energy Conversion Devices stock, ECD said. Standard Oil acted after announcing last week that it will cut its exploration spending this year to half of the $915 million that it spent in 1985.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1987 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Raising the prospect of a billion-dollar family spat, investment bankers hired by Standard Oil Co. said Monday that the company's stock is worth at least $85 a share instead of the $70 offered last month by controlling partner British Petroleum. A report commissioned by Standard Oil's board said the $7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Decades before there were automobiles, there was Mentryville: California's first oil boomtown, not far from Los Angeles. Its first gusher kept producing for 114 years. Gold turned up in these parts seven years before the 1849 Gold Rush. Cattleman Francisco Lopez pulled a few wild onions out of the ground and noticed flakes in the roots. San Fernando placers, as they were called, poured into Placerita Canyon in what is now the Santa Clarita area.
OPINION
April 23, 2002 | MOSHE ADLER, Moshe Adler is an economist in the urban planning department at Columbia University. E-mail: ma820@columbia.edu.
This time it's Bill Gates himself who is repeating the mantra that Microsoft never hurt consumers, and that it is only consumers who will suffer if the corporation is forced to make Windows compatible with competitors' software. If previous court rounds are any indication, many consumers and most economists will side with Gates. Most consumers don't want to struggle with installing different software programs.
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