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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2000
Using the drug fludarabine as the first line of defense keeps chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at bay longer than standard treatment, but it does not affect overall survival, according to a study in today's New England Journal of Medicine. CLL is the most common form of leukemia in adults, striking about 8,100 people in the United States each year.
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SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Discouraging news for diabetics who are keen to ward off memory problems and keep their brains in peak condition: New research has found that using medication to aggressively drive down blood pressure or improve lipid levels does not do more than standard therapy to stem the decline in cognition that's common among such patients. In fact, aggressively lowering systolic blood pressure may accelerate brain shrinkage, which is a hallmark of dementia, the new study found. The findings , published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, emerge from a large and long-running clinical trial aimed at figuring out what measures might improve the health prospects of people at highest risk of cardiovascular disease.
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SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Discouraging news for diabetics who are keen to ward off memory problems and keep their brains in peak condition: New research has found that using medication to aggressively drive down blood pressure or improve lipid levels does not do more than standard therapy to stem the decline in cognition that's common among such patients. In fact, aggressively lowering systolic blood pressure may accelerate brain shrinkage, which is a hallmark of dementia, the new study found. The findings , published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, emerge from a large and long-running clinical trial aimed at figuring out what measures might improve the health prospects of people at highest risk of cardiovascular disease.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Cassandra Willyard
Last fall, Dena Harris went to a rehab facility to visit her 90-year-old mother, who was recovering from a broken hip. Harris knew something wasn't right: Her mother's skin was pale and her eyes glassy. The doctors diagnosed her with a raging gut infection of Clostridium difficile , a nasty bacterium that causes watery diarrhea. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that C. difficile kills 14,000 people each year in the U.S. alone. Harris' mother, Ann Hart, received the standard treatment - a hefty dose of antibiotics - but the drugs provided only temporary relief.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
First Lady Barbara Bush will undergo treatment with radioactive iodine today at Walter Reed Army Medical Center to destroy her thyroid gland, which is producing excess amounts of hormones, her spokeswoman said Tuesday. Mrs. Bush is expected to lose normal function of the gland in two to three months and then will have to take daily medication to maintain adequate hormone levels, a statement from her office said. The radiation procedure, an alternative to surgery, is standard treatment for Mrs. Bush's recently diagnosed condition, known as Graves disease, and has no major side effects, said Anna Perez, the First Lady's press secretary.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Cassandra Willyard
Last fall, Dena Harris went to a rehab facility to visit her 90-year-old mother, who was recovering from a broken hip. Harris knew something wasn't right: Her mother's skin was pale and her eyes glassy. The doctors diagnosed her with a raging gut infection of Clostridium difficile , a nasty bacterium that causes watery diarrhea. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that C. difficile kills 14,000 people each year in the U.S. alone. Harris' mother, Ann Hart, received the standard treatment - a hefty dose of antibiotics - but the drugs provided only temporary relief.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN
Mission Viejo psychiatrist Martin Jensen says everyone has some degree of brain chemical differences. "Sometimes they're assets; other times they're drawbacks," he said, but if they're causing problems concerning the quality of your life, "it's worth treating." Jensen believes the standard psychiatric method of diagnosis and treatment works for most people, "but it's a little limited in certain complex situations."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
For someone who was as celebrated internationally as France's Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel, the woman who inspired dozens of biographies by changing the shape of 20th century fashion, not that much is known for sure about her formative years. "Chanel lied all the time. She used to say, 'I invented my life because I didn't like my life,' " Anne Fontaine has said, with Audrey Tautou adding, "Chanel always disguised the reality. It takes some cunning to know who Chanel really was." Though Chanel's reticence may sound like a barrier to filmmakers, it stimulated co-writer and director Fontaine and star Tautou, who've combined to turn "Coco Before Chanel" into a superior filmed biography that brings intelligence, restraint and style to what could have been a more standard treatment.
HEALTH
November 3, 1997
Children and young adults with early stage non-Hodgkin's lymphoma can often be treated successfully with no radiation and with lower than usual doses of chemotherapy, according to Stanford University researchers. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a disease of the lymph nodes, is one of the most curable types of cancer, especially if treated early. However, the treatment itself can cause damaging side effects. In the Oct. 30 New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Michael P.
HEALTH
September 15, 2003 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Some parents of children diagnosed with attention deficit disorder will try just about anything to avoid drug treatment -- homeopathy, chiropractic, massage, even faith healing. "There's a label, a stigma that goes with drug treatment," said Dr. Regina Bussing, a child psychiatrist at the University of Florida who conducted a recent survey of 1,600 families in that state.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
For someone who was as celebrated internationally as France's Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel, the woman who inspired dozens of biographies by changing the shape of 20th century fashion, not that much is known for sure about her formative years. "Chanel lied all the time. She used to say, 'I invented my life because I didn't like my life,' " Anne Fontaine has said, with Audrey Tautou adding, "Chanel always disguised the reality. It takes some cunning to know who Chanel really was." Though Chanel's reticence may sound like a barrier to filmmakers, it stimulated co-writer and director Fontaine and star Tautou, who've combined to turn "Coco Before Chanel" into a superior filmed biography that brings intelligence, restraint and style to what could have been a more standard treatment.
HEALTH
September 15, 2003 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Some parents of children diagnosed with attention deficit disorder will try just about anything to avoid drug treatment -- homeopathy, chiropractic, massage, even faith healing. "There's a label, a stigma that goes with drug treatment," said Dr. Regina Bussing, a child psychiatrist at the University of Florida who conducted a recent survey of 1,600 families in that state.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Schering-Plough Corp. said Wednesday it has received regulatory approval to sell two hepatitis C drugs in a combination package that's expected to become the new "gold standard" for treating a disease that affects 4 million Americans. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said the New Jersey pharmaceuticals company can sell Peg-Intron, a longer-lasting form of its Intron A drug, in a single-package combination with its Rebetol drug from ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2000
Using the drug fludarabine as the first line of defense keeps chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at bay longer than standard treatment, but it does not affect overall survival, according to a study in today's New England Journal of Medicine. CLL is the most common form of leukemia in adults, striking about 8,100 people in the United States each year.
HEALTH
November 3, 1997
Children and young adults with early stage non-Hodgkin's lymphoma can often be treated successfully with no radiation and with lower than usual doses of chemotherapy, according to Stanford University researchers. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a disease of the lymph nodes, is one of the most curable types of cancer, especially if treated early. However, the treatment itself can cause damaging side effects. In the Oct. 30 New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Michael P.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A medical expert Monday questioned why doctors reportedly never exposed Ventura County's community college chief, dying from a "flesh-eating bacteria" infection, to one of medicine's primary defenses against the condition: pure oxygen treatments in a pressurized hyperbaric chamber. Thomas G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Comic actor John Ritter died on his daughter's 5th birthday in September 2003. The next day, his widow, actress Amy Yasbeck, told the girl that her dad's death was unavoidable. Since then, Yasbeck has come to believe the story she told their daughter Stella was wrong. "The doctors told it to me like I was 5 and I told it to her like she was 5," Yasbeck said in an interview with The Times. "The truth is, it's a lot more complicated and it's a lot more sad."
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A study designed to compare two drugs used to treat a sight-threatening condition common to AIDS patients has unexpectedly found that patients taking one of the drugs lived longer than those given the second, federal health officials announced Monday. AIDS patients taking the recently approved foscarnet lived an average of four months longer than those who were taking ganciclovir, which has been on the market since 1989.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN
Mission Viejo psychiatrist Martin Jensen says everyone has some degree of brain chemical differences. "Sometimes they're assets; other times they're drawbacks," he said, but if they're causing problems concerning the quality of your life, "it's worth treating." Jensen believes the standard psychiatric method of diagnosis and treatment works for most people, "but it's a little limited in certain complex situations."
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A study designed to compare two drugs used to treat a sight-threatening condition common to AIDS patients has unexpectedly found that patients taking one of the drugs lived longer than those given the second, federal health officials announced Monday. AIDS patients taking the recently approved foscarnet lived an average of four months longer than those who were taking ganciclovir, which has been on the market since 1989.
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