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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997
The 21-member California Academic Standards Commission last week issued recommendations for what the state's 5.5 million public school students should know in reading, writing, math and other subjects. The standards, which still must be approved by the State Board of Education, will be voluntary. But they are expected to guide education from kindergarten through grade 12 statewide, in part because they will serve as the basis for new standardized tests pushed by Gov. Pete Wilson.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - Are you on the home-buying sidelines this spring because you think you won't be able to qualify for a mortgage? Do you know what sort of FICO credit scores are being accepted by lenders at the moment - they're lower than they were a year ago - and whether yours could now be good enough? You may be part of the surprisingly large crowd of folks who fear the home-loan unknown. A new national consumer survey found that 56% of potential purchasers of homes say they're out of the market because they don't want to face the possibility of rejection by lenders.
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NEWS
October 26, 1994 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The first national standards proposed for teaching history in America's public schools will be unveiled today amid complaints from conservatives that political correctness prompted the slighting of familiar historical figures such as Ulysses S. Grant and the Wright brothers.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Cars and light-duty trucks for the 2012 model year exceeded new federal standards for fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The 2012 fleet averages 23.6 miles per gallon, up from 22.4 for the previous model year - one of the greatest improvements in fuel economy in 30 years, according to a report released Friday. And the cars and trucks pump out an average of 286 grams of carbon dioxide per mile, nine grams less than the EPA standard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2001
Saying the federal government isn't doing enough to ensure that drinking water is safe, U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer on Wednesday introduced a bill calling on the Environmental Protection Agency to establish a separate federal standard for chromium 6. The legislation, co-sponsored by Boxer (D-Calif.) and Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.), would require the EPA to set a chromium 6 limit based on recommendations by the National Academy of Sciences.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1995 | STEVE G. STEINBERG, Steve G. Steinberg (steve@wired.com) is an editor at Wired magazine
The growth of the Internet's World Wide Web has been so rapid as to be frightening. Like the movie monsters that swallowed New York, its relentless advance is seemingly impervious to obstacles and outside of human control. But, just as every monster turned out to have its Achilles heel, the Web seems to have a serious flaw. The problem is with the language used by the Web to describe the appearance and content of a document.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1998 | Reuters
Eleven paging companies serving more than 30 million customers said they agreed to a set of service standards that will allow them to transmit customized Internet-based information to paging devices. Paging companies will be able to provide more specialized packages of information from the World Wide Web to customers' hand-held paging devices.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IBM and Apple, with an assist from Motorola, set aside their legendary differences long enough Monday to formally unveil a new common personal computer standard for the PowerPC microprocessor they began developing three years ago. But machines based on the joint specifications and designed to run a variety of operating systems won't appear until 1996. In the meantime, computer industry watchers say, the IBM-Apple alliance could stumble over technical and political hurdles.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quiet maneuvering over industry standards for a digital successor to the videocassette recorder erupted into open battle Friday as Sony Corp. and Philips made public their long-awaited video disc standard, only to have Toshiba Corp. brusquely assert that its own upcoming technology is better. The new technologies, expected to hit the market late next year, will offer high-quality home movies on digital discs similar to audio compact discs.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Look around at the most powerful ideas emerging in education, crime and welfare policy and the same current runs through them: a hunger for firm and simple rules. From Washington to the individual states, shrewd leaders in both parties are trying to ground social policies in an idea so old it seems new: that common standards of behavior can and should be applied to everyone. If this inchoate movement had a motto, it might be: "No excuses, no exceptions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
A day after hearing hours of impassioned testimony from a divided trucking industry, California air quality regulators on Friday postponed deadlines for aging heavy-duty trucks to comply with the nation's toughest diesel air pollution rules. The action by the state Air Resources Board will give small fleets, lightly used trucks and those operating in rural areas more time to upgrade to newer, cleaner models or install filters to remove soot from their exhaust. Officials say the changes will slow pollution cuts for several years but still allow the state to reach its goal of cutting diesel emissions 85% by 2020.
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
The number that matters most is not 500. The number that matters most is 0. That is the number of major league players that have hit more home runs this season than Albert Pujols. He got a mighty sweet serenade in the visiting clubhouse in Washington on Tuesday night after he hit his 500th home run. But the Angels are not paying him a quarter-billion dollars for reminders of how great he was when he played for the St. Louis Cardinals. INTERACTIVE: Compare salaries on Angels, Nationals If that really is the classic Pujols back at-bat, that would be a big swing toward an October different from the last two, when he and the Angels stayed home and the Pujols-less Cardinals advanced deep into the playoffs.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2014 | By Tim Logan
Sarah Luna wants to buy a home in up-and-coming northeast Los Angeles before it's too late. At 31, she has a master's degree and earns more than $70,000 as a court reporter and freelance editor. She daydreams about trading the Glendale apartment she shares for a little condo, maybe in Echo Park or Highland Park. Just one thing holds her back: The $700 she's paid every month since 2008, after she graduated from the University of Southern California - with $75,000 in student debt.
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The Clippers have never won more games in a season. They've also never been better at home. All of which may not mean much depending on how the next few months go. There was no denying that the Clippers' 117-105 triumph over the Denver Nuggets on Tuesday night at Staples Center gave them franchise records of 57 victories and 34 home wins in the same season. BOX SCORE: Clippers 117, Nuggets 105 Of course, those aren't the ultimate goals for a team seeking to make it past the second round of the playoffs for the first time.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
The goal of the Los Angeles Times is to publish a newspaper of the highest quality. This requires The Times to be, above all else, a principled newspaper. Making it so is the responsibility of every staff member. In deed and in appearance, journalists at The Times must keep themselves - and the newspaper - above reproach. The ways a newspaper can discredit itself are beyond calculation; these guidelines do not purport to cover them all. It is up to staff members to master these general principles and, beyond that, to listen carefully to their individual sense of right and wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Dan Weikel and Ralph Vartabedian
State and federal investigators probing the cause of the fiery collision between a FedEx big rig and a charter bus in Northern California will delve into a wide range of factors from the health and rest of the truck driver to emergency exits and fire protection for bus passengers. "This is a very significant and unfortunate tragedy," said Jim Hall, a transportation safety consultant and former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board. "The NTSB is going to have its hands full on this one. " Although the cause of the accident has yet to be determined, Hall and other safety advocates say it could focus new attention on the NTSB's efforts to improve bus safety and the behind-the-scenes battle over safety standards for motor coaches and other commercial vehicles.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1994 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
After spending billions trying to bully America into doubling the video resolution of its analog television sets, Japan finally conceded that the D in HDTV will have to stand for digital . The very next day, the Japanese commenced a furious backpedal--right off a cliff. But all this sound and fury signifies nothing. Even Japan Inc. can't impose an outdated technology by group incantation.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
MasterCard International Inc. said it resumed talks with Visa International Inc. over a set of guidelines designed to prevent theft of financial information on the Internet. The development of a single standard could accelerate the acceptance of electronic commerce on the Internet. The talks bring together MasterCard and its partner, Netscape Communications Corp., with Visa and Microsoft Corp. Other companies involved include RSA Data Security Inc. and VeriSign Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Nick Stepka knew what gift would make his daughter's third birthday a hit, and it wasn't a toy or doll. He gave her a tablet - not a sleek new iPad or a hand-me-down Samsung, but one specifically designed and marketed for little ones. It even came with a purple protective casing and loaded with kids' apps and games. "Her eyes lit up when she opened it," said Stepka, 34, a Shakopee, Minn., father of three. "Everything else got put to the side. " That's exactly what tablet makers and companies that create children's entertainment were hoping for. PHOTOS: Top 10 gadgets we want to see this year Stepka's household is part of a growing group of consumers for whom traditional children's toys and games are not enough.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
For decades, questions posed to Hillary Rodham Clinton have turned on the subject of hair. But for all the eyerolls, that famous coif - in all its scrunchie-to-bob iterations - has turned out to be a very helpful talking point. The occasion Thursday night was Tina Brown's “Women In the World” conference in New York, and it was New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman - introduced by Brown as a “sensitive man” -   who asked the former secretary of State and her co-panelist, International Monetary Fund Chief Christine Lagarde, to reflect on whether there was “still a double standard in the media about how we talk about women in public life.” To laughter, Friedman recalled a news clip in which Clinton had said she'd flown all night to meet with a foreign leader and had tied her hair back - “and you said when you came into the room, he was really frightened,” Friedman said, “because he had heard that when your hair was back, you were going to deliver unpleasant news.” “Really, Tom?
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