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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | TINA NGUYEN and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Panicked school officials in scores of districts statewide are feverishly rescheduling STAR test dates after a computer breakdown and snowstorm delayed the arrival of test booklets. The glitches could result in frenzied, last-minute changes in hundreds of thousands of students' daily school schedules.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | TINA NGUYEN and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Panicked school officials in scores of districts statewide are feverishly rescheduling STAR test dates after a computer breakdown and snowstorm delayed the arrival of test booklets. The glitches could result in frenzied, last-minute changes in hundreds of thousands of students' daily school schedules.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2004 | Cynthia Daniels, Times Staff Writer
The State Superintendent of Public Instruction unveiled on Friday a newly designed report card for state standardized test scores that is expected to help parents interpret their children's academic strengths and weaknesses. "[The previous report card] was too complicated, difficult to interpret and not easy to understand," said Supt. Jack O'Connell during a telephone press conference from Sacramento. "You really had to be a psychometrician to extract information from this.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Jack Mosbacher
In the coming weeks, Gov. Jerry Brown will likely sign AB 484, a measure that would put the state at odds with the Obama administration and risk $1.5 billion in federal funding by effectively suspending data collection on K-12 student achievement for the current school year as the state transitions to the Common Core curriculum. What this effort doesn't consider is that there are other crucial changes taking place in California's education system, including different ways to allocate funding to schools.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | DAN MORAIN and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Gray Davis is proposing to award 100,000 of California's best public high school students as much as $5,500 toward tuition at a college of their choice, an aide said Tuesday. Davis will outline the plan--costing about $118 million a year--in his State of the State speech tonight, and flesh it out in his proposed budget for the 2000-01 fiscal year to be released next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1999 | DAVID KLEIN and R. JAMES MILGRAM, David Klein, a CSUN mathematics professor, was appointed by the state Board of Education to evaluate mathematics teacher professional development programs. E-mail: david.klein@csun.edu. R. James Milgram is a Stanford University mathematics professor who regularly advises the state Board of Education on math issues. E-mail: milgram@gauss.stanford.edu
The new Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education deserves praise and encouragement for its efforts to improve student academic achievement. Unfortunately, in the case of mathematics education, the board is getting bad advice from district staff. Phonics and other basic language skills have received well-deserved national attention in recent years. As a result, "whole language" is disappearing from the curriculum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2002 | DANIEL YI and CLAIRE LUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County students continued to make steady gains on the Stanford 9 tests and outperformed their peers statewide for the fifth year in a row, but the results for individual schools, made public Thursday, were a mixed bag. According to a Times analysis, 58% of Orange County's second-to 11th-graders who took the test last spring scored at or above the national average. The number was 49% in 1998, the first year the test was administered.
NEWS
September 26, 1999
In the last three weeks of the 1999 California legislative session, lawmakers shoveled through nearly 900 bills on subjects ranging from sweeping HMO reform to bunk bed safety. This end-of-session avalanche is known both for its overwhelming workload and for attempts by legislators, amid the confusion, to sneak through special interest bills. The bulk of the bills--more than 700 at last count--are on the desk of Gov. Gray Davis, who must decide before Oct.
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