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Stanford Achievement Test

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1997
The Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition, was given for the first time in the Los Angeles Unified School District last spring to 363,612 students in grades 1-10. The Aprenda was given to 122,451 Spanish-speaking students in grades 1-10. Both are nationally normed tests, with scores expressed in median percentiles, which represent the results for the middle-scoring student in relationship to students across the country.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Eshelman Avenue Elementary School in Lomita would appear to have the cards stacked against it: Most pupils come from low-income households, and many speak little or no English at home. So how did the school handily outscore its peers statewide on the Stanford 9? Principal Winnie Washington gives much of the credit to "direct instruction," a highly structured, step-by-step curriculum that requires teachers and students to follow interactive scripts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
The president of the company that publishes a state-mandated student achievement test said the exam has not been compromised by similar questions in a math workbook. Two practice tests in the workbook were nearly identical to portions of the Stanford Achievement Test Ninth Edition, the Escondido-based North County Times reported last month. But the Stanford 9 has "internal design features" that differ from the practice tests, Eugene T.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
* UNDERSTANDING THE NUMBERS / READING THE TABLES In California, nearly 4.5 million public school students in grades 2 through 11 took the Stanford 9 standardized tests in the spring for the fourth consecutive year. All of them were tested in reading, math and language skills such as grammar and punctuation. Students through eighth grade also took a spelling test, and students in higher grades took exams in science and history/social science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998 | Thomas Brooks, Brooks is manager of applied research for Harcourt Brace Educational Measurement, the company that markets the test
The first edition of the Stanford Achievement Test was developed at Stanford University in Palo Alto and published in 1923. The population of California was about 4,270,000. This year, the ninth edition of the Stanford Achievement Test (Stanford 9) was given to more than 4,150,000 California students, almost enough students to have populated the state 75 years ago.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
A company that has written California's statewide school test for the last two years and was plagued with problems this year will get more money for its third effort. Harcourt Educational Measurement, based in San Antonio will have new duties along with the increase, including trying new writing tests on some fourth- and seventh-graders. The state Board of Education approved a state contract Tuesday with Harcourt that will give the test publisher $6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Anaheim Union High School District's scores on the statewide Stanford Achievement Test continued to rise this year, although they remained below average in most cases. District officials were happy. "What makes my socks go up and down is the fact the scores have improved each year," said Mary Dalessi, coordinator of research and evaluation for the district. "That's what you want to see with this testing. It's not going to be dramatic."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998 | Ruben Carriedo, Carriedo is assistant superintendent for planning assessment and accountability for the San Diego Unified School District
The impending release of test scores from the statewide assessment program (STAR) includes results for California students in grades two through 11 on the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition (SAT 9), in language arts, mathematics, science and history/social studies. These data will provide valuable information about student learning for nearly 100,000 students in San Diego city schools and 4 million across California.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
Ending a two-year legal battle, the San Francisco Unified School District has agreed to give the Stanford 9 achievement test next spring to thousands of students who are not yet fluent in English. The change of heart, part of a settlement announced last week, followed a promise by the state Board of Education to clarify a regulation about testing exemptions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good news hit Carl E. Gilbert Elementary a couple days after school let out, so Monday's celebration was muted. But Principal Jack Hay was decidedly excited that his school's standardized test scores are up--way up. "My first reaction was, 'Whoa, baby!' " Hay said. The cause of his exuberance? The Buena Park school posted double-digit percentile jumps in 15 of the 20 subjects and grade levels tested on the state's high-stakes standardized test.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Fewer than one-third of California public school students achieved proficiency on a key test offering the first glimpse of their ability to meet challenging English standards, the state Education Department reported Wednesday. At the same time, fourth- and seventh-graders turned in a sobering performance on a new writing exam, the first part of the state's massive testing program to stray from the multiple-choice format.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
* UNDERSTANDING THE NUMBERS / READING THE TABLES In California, nearly 4.5 million public school students in grades 2 through 11 took the Stanford 9 standardized tests in the spring, for the fourth year in a row. All of them were tested in reading, math and language skills such as grammar and punctuation. Students through eighth grade also took a spelling test, and students in higher grades took exams in science and history/social science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles Unified elementary schools made strong gains on the Stanford 9 test for the third consecutive year, but the district's high schools once again failed to improve, according to data released Tuesday. Students in grades 2 to 5 showed consistent improvement on the state's basic skills exam. That progress appeared to reach middle schools for the first time, where sixth-grade gains resembled those in the elementary schools.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES and JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scattered resistance to California's Stanford 9 testing program is popping up statewide as teachers, parents and students protest a system that they say values test scores over actual learning. At the tiny Santa Monica Alternative School House, parents of more than 60% of students in second through eighth grades chose not to let their children take the test this month, saying they considered it a waste of time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new study commissioned by the California Teachers Assn. confirms what educators have long known about student achievement: Schools with mostly economically and linguistically disadvantaged students perform at far lower levels than those with affluent children. The study examined how schools statewide fared on California's new Academic Performance Index, which ranks campuses on the basis of their Stanford 9 test scores.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
About 300 low-ranked schools that showed extraordinary gains in Stanford 9 scores will divide up a $100-million state pot designed to reward teachers and principals, according to a list unveiled Thursday by the California Department of Education. Those schools represent fewer than one-quarter of the 1,346 schools statewide that met the criteria for the big-money rewards--which has generated consternation among critics of the governor's award program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA and ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wilma Figueroa, a sophomore at Kennedy High School in Granada Hills, was looking for some divine intervention Monday. "I'm extremely nervous and I feel lots of pressure," she said. "So I was praying that I do good." She was not alone. This week, many schools throughout Southern California began a rite of spring that sends thousands of students scurrying to the books, puts some teachers in a frenzy and sets many principals on edge--the Stanford 9 achievement test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After laboring for a year under a mandate to raise their school's already good standardized test scores, teachers at Truman Benedict Elementary School in Capistrano Unified headed off for summer vacation Thursday not knowing they had accomplished their mission. They had finished their last day of school and filed out the door just three hours before newly released Stanford 9 results showed that Benedict's scores had soared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
New laptop computers. Kid-friendly furniture. Books for classroom libraries. White boards to replace dusty blackboards. These are among the myriad ways that California public schools plan to spend the $227 million in taxpayer-funded rewards that will soon begin flowing under Gov. Gray Davis' school accountability program. Today, the California Department of Education will post on its Web site the list of 4,502 schools that will receive this windfall, along with the amount each will get.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's massive standardized testing program is having some unintended effects both in and outside the classroom, results that have little to do with lawmakers' goals of improving education and boosting accountability. At some schools, teachers have students read short passages instead of entire books because that's what's on the test. At other schools, lessons on science and social studies have been abandoned to make more time for drilling on test-related material.
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